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Land

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  • Martha-Gay Morton
    Just sharing.   Abstract from article by James W. Miller, Jr. Platting Land Grants and Deeds NCGSJ-May 90 pages 80-85. * Currently there is software to plat
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 3, 2010
      Just sharing.
       
      Abstract from article by James W. Miller, Jr. "Platting Land Grants and Deeds" NCGSJ-May 90 pages 80-85. * Currently there is software to plat deeds so you do not have to do it by hand.
       
      ............."Land ownership research, whether in land grants or realty conveyances, along with research in wills, estates records, court minutes and civil actions, military and pension records, and myriad other records, can assist a genealogist in developing his progenitor's TOTAL profile far beyond the vital statistics of birth, death and marriage............."
       
      ........"From the time settlers first began arriving in North Carolina, and until the present, land measurements have been made under a system called "metes and bounds". This system was in use while North Carolina exhisted as a proprietary colony from 1663 to 1729, a crown colony from 1729 to 1776, and after the state opened its land grant office in 1778. Individuals buying and selling realty used the same system and continue to do so today. The second Earl of Granville used the same system in his Granville Proprietary [or Granville District as it is commonly called] until his death in 1763, after which no settler could obtain a land grant in the district, including the area which is now Catawba County. Between 1763 and 1778 settlers could purchase real estate from those who were fortunate enough to have received their grant prior to Granville's death, but they could not obtain title to vacant land." ..........................
       
      ................"Colonial or crown patents in North Carolina ceased to be issued in 1774. In April 1775, the Assembly met and was dissolved, thus ending royal rule in North Carolina. ................"
       
      ..................."Begore attempting to plat or map the boundaries of a land grant [correct terminology "a grant of patent"] one should first havea basic understanding of the four principal steps involved in the grant process: entry, warrant, survey and patent. In making a land entry the settler after choosing the land he desired to acquire would make application to the appropriate land official describing the land he had chosen. The date of entry is one of the best ways to prove a person's earliest apperance in an area, unless he was a squatter. After the entry was made and no caveat attached to it a warrant was issued by the proper authority to the County Surveyor authorizing him to "admeasure and lay out" the lands for the enterer as described. The surveyor would proceed to the area in question with his instruments and survey the land., giving precise description of the "metes and bounds" or boundry lines. He would also draw a small plat of the
      survey including the scale he used, usually given in the number of poles or chains to the inch..
      On these surveys researchers will ofetn find the names of individuals who helped the surveyor by dragging the s




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • cheryl rhoden
      Hi Martha ,, Interesting. Thanks for posting this. I think part of your message was cut off at the end. best, Cheryl Rhoden Researching:
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 3, 2010
        Hi Martha ,, Interesting. Thanks for posting this. I think part of your message was cut off at the end. best, Cheryl Rhoden

        Researching: Moore/Rhoden/Raulerson/Johns/Mayfield/O'Steen and more




        ________________________________
        From: Martha-Gay Morton <marthagay.morton@...>
        To: Edgecombe_Wilson_Nash_Halifax@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, February 3, 2010 8:04:39 AM
        Subject: [genpcncfir] Land

         

        Just sharing.
         
        Abstract from article by James W. Miller, Jr. "Platting Land Grants and Deeds" NCGSJ-May 90 pages 80-85. * Currently there is software to plat deeds so you do not have to do it by hand.
         
        ............ ."Land ownership research, whether in land grants or realty conveyances, along with research in wills, estates records, court minutes and civil actions, military and pension records, and myriad other records, can assist a genealogist in developing his progenitor's TOTAL profile far beyond the vital statistics of birth, death and marriage.... ......... "
         
        ........"From the time settlers first began arriving in North Carolina, and until the present, land measurements have been made under a system called "metes and bounds". This system was in use while North Carolina exhisted as a proprietary colony from 1663 to 1729, a crown colony from 1729 to 1776, and after the state opened its land grant office in 1778. Individuals buying and selling realty used the same system and continue to do so today. The second Earl of Granville used the same system in his Granville Proprietary [or Granville District as it is commonly called] until his death in 1763, after which no settler could obtain a land grant in the district, including the area which is now Catawba County. Between 1763 and 1778 settlers could purchase real estate from those who were fortunate enough to have received their grant prior to Granville's death, but they could not obtain title to vacant land." ............ ......... .....
         
        ............ ...."Colonial or crown patents in North Carolina ceased to be issued in 1774. In April 1775, the Assembly met and was dissolved, thus ending royal rule in North Carolina. ............ ...."
         
        ............ ......."Begore attempting to plat or map the boundaries of a land grant [correct terminology "a grant of patent"] one should first havea basic understanding of the four principal steps involved in the grant process: entry, warrant, survey and patent. In making a land entry the settler after choosing the land he desired to acquire would make application to the appropriate land official describing the land he had chosen. The date of entry is one of the best ways to prove a person's earliest apperance in an area, unless he was a squatter. After the entry was made and no caveat attached to it a warrant was issued by the proper authority to the County Surveyor authorizing him to "admeasure and lay out" the lands for the enterer as described. The surveyor would proceed to the area in question with his instruments and survey the land., giving precise description of the "metes and bounds" or boundry lines. He would also draw a small plat of the
        survey including the scale he used, usually given in the number of poles or chains to the inch..
        On these surveys researchers will ofetn find the names of individuals who helped the surveyor by dragging the s

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bill & Gayle Arnold
        Thank you for this great information. I have spent many hours in the basement vault in the courthouse in Greenville making copies of deeds between 1770 and
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 3, 2010
          Thank you for this great information. I have spent many hours in the
          basement vault in the courthouse in Greenville making copies of deeds
          between 1770 and 1820. The deedbooks are in great condition, and the index
          is very good. The clerks are very helpful. It has been lots of fun to
          drive around and look at land that was farmed by my gggggrandfather near
          Grimesland. Sometimes you even get a chance to walk around on the land.

          I have never found an actual drawn survey. I have planned to draw up some
          myself but have not gotten around to actually doing it. Where would I find
          access to these 90 pages? Where can I find information as to how to plat
          the land using software instead of pencil and paper?

          Bill Arnold - Birmingham, Alabama.

          On Wed, Feb 3, 2010 at 10:25 AM, cheryl rhoden <rhodenccc@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > Hi Martha ,, Interesting. Thanks for posting this. I think part of your
          > message was cut off at the end. best, Cheryl Rhoden
          >
          > Researching: Moore/Rhoden/Raulerson/Johns/Mayfield/O'Steen and more
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Martha-Gay Morton <marthagay.morton@...<marthagay.morton%40yahoo.com>
          > >
          > To: Edgecombe_Wilson_Nash_Halifax@yahoogroups.com<Edgecombe_Wilson_Nash_Halifax%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Cc: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com <genpcncfir%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Wed, February 3, 2010 8:04:39 AM
          > Subject: [genpcncfir] Land
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Just sharing.
          >
          > Abstract from article by James W. Miller, Jr. "Platting Land Grants and
          > Deeds" NCGSJ-May 90 pages 80-85. * Currently there is software to plat deeds
          > so you do not have to do it by hand.
          >
          > ............ ."Land ownership research, whether in land grants or
          > realty conveyances, along with research in wills, estates records, court
          > minutes and civil actions, military and pension records, and myriad other
          > records, can assist a genealogist in developing his progenitor's TOTAL
          > profile far beyond the vital statistics of birth, death and marriage....
          > ......... "
          >
          > ........"From the time settlers first began arriving in North Carolina, and
          > until the present, land measurements have been made under a system
          > called "metes and bounds". This system was in use while North Carolina
          > exhisted as a proprietary colony from 1663 to 1729, a crown colony from 1729
          > to 1776, and after the state opened its land grant office in 1778.
          > Individuals buying and selling realty used the same system and continue to
          > do so today. The second Earl of Granville used the same system in his
          > Granville Proprietary [or Granville District as it is commonly called] until
          > his death in 1763, after which no settler could obtain a land grant in the
          > district, including the area which is now Catawba County. Between 1763 and
          > 1778 settlers could purchase real estate from those who were fortunate
          > enough to have received their grant prior to Granville's death, but they
          > could not obtain title to vacant land." ............ ......... .....
          >
          > ............ ...."Colonial or crown patents in North Carolina ceased to be
          > issued in 1774. In April 1775, the Assembly met and was dissolved, thus
          > ending royal rule in North Carolina. ............ ...."
          >
          > ............ ......."Begore attempting to plat or map the boundaries of a
          > land grant [correct terminology "a grant of patent"] one should first havea
          > basic understanding of the four principal steps involved in the grant
          > process: entry, warrant, survey and patent. In making a land entry the
          > settler after choosing the land he desired to acquire would make application
          > to the appropriate land official describing the land he had chosen. The date
          > of entry is one of the best ways to prove a person's earliest apperance in
          > an area, unless he was a squatter. After the entry was made and no caveat
          > attached to it a warrant was issued by the proper authority to the County
          > Surveyor authorizing him to "admeasure and lay out" the lands for the
          > enterer as described. The surveyor would proceed to the area in question
          > with his instruments and survey the land., giving precise description of the
          > "metes and bounds" or boundry lines. He would also draw a small plat of the
          > survey including the scale he used, usually given in the number of poles or
          > chains to the inch..
          > On these surveys researchers will ofetn find the names of individuals who
          > helped the surveyor by dragging the s
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Martha-Gay Morton
          Google Deedmapper and your will find how to order their software. This is the one I use. I am sure there are many others. I still do many of my deeds by hand,
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 3, 2010
            Google Deedmapper and your will find how to order their software. This is the one I use. I am sure there are many others. I still do many of my deeds by hand, although this takes more time.
            The article came from the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal May 1990 issue. pages 80-85. Copies of these journals are in many libraries.
            All the best.
            MGM

            --- On Wed, 2/3/10, Bill & Gayle Arnold <billgaylearnold@...> wrote:


            From: Bill & Gayle Arnold <billgaylearnold@...>
            Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Land
            To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 5:17 PM


            Thank you for this great information.  I have spent many hours in the
            basement vault in the courthouse in Greenville making copies of deeds
            between 1770 and 1820.  The deedbooks are in great condition, and the index
            is very good.  The clerks are very helpful.  It has been lots of fun to
            drive around and look at land that was farmed by my gggggrandfather near
            Grimesland.  Sometimes you even get a chance to walk around on the land.

            I have never found an actual drawn survey.  I have planned to draw up some
            myself but have not gotten around to actually doing it.  Where would I find
            access to these 90 pages?  Where can I find information as to how to plat
            the land using software instead of pencil and paper?

            Bill Arnold  -  Birmingham, Alabama.

            On Wed, Feb 3, 2010 at 10:25 AM, cheryl rhoden <rhodenccc@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > Hi Martha ,, Interesting. Thanks for posting this. I think part of your
            > message was cut off at the end. best, Cheryl Rhoden
            >
            > Researching: Moore/Rhoden/Raulerson/Johns/Mayfield/O'Steen and more
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Martha-Gay Morton <marthagay.morton@...<marthagay.morton%40yahoo.com>
            > >
            > To: Edgecombe_Wilson_Nash_Halifax@yahoogroups.com<Edgecombe_Wilson_Nash_Halifax%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Cc: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com <genpcncfir%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Wed, February 3, 2010 8:04:39 AM
            > Subject: [genpcncfir] Land
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Just sharing.
            >
            > Abstract from article by James W. Miller, Jr. "Platting Land Grants and
            > Deeds" NCGSJ-May 90 pages 80-85. * Currently there is software to plat deeds
            > so you do not have to do it by hand.
            >
            > ............ ."Land ownership research, whether in land grants or
            > realty conveyances, along with research in wills, estates records, court
            > minutes and civil actions, military and pension records, and myriad other
            > records, can assist a genealogist in developing his progenitor's TOTAL
            > profile far beyond the vital statistics of birth, death and marriage....
            > ......... "
            >
            > ........"From the time settlers first began arriving in North Carolina, and
            > until the present, land measurements have been made under a system
            > called "metes and bounds". This system was in use while North Carolina
            > exhisted as a proprietary colony from 1663 to 1729, a crown colony from 1729
            > to 1776, and after the state opened its land grant office in 1778.
            > Individuals buying and selling realty used the same system and continue to
            > do so today. The second Earl of Granville used the same system in his
            > Granville Proprietary [or Granville District as it is commonly called] until
            > his death in 1763, after which no settler could obtain a land grant in the
            > district, including the area which is now Catawba County. Between 1763 and
            > 1778 settlers could purchase real estate from those who were fortunate
            > enough to have received their grant prior to Granville's death, but they
            > could not obtain title to vacant land." ............ ......... .....
            >
            > ............ ...."Colonial or crown patents in North Carolina ceased to be
            > issued in 1774. In April 1775, the Assembly met and was dissolved, thus
            > ending royal rule in North Carolina. ............ ...."
            >
            > ............ ......."Begore attempting to plat or map the boundaries of a
            > land grant [correct terminology "a grant of patent"] one should first havea
            > basic understanding of the four principal steps involved in the grant
            > process: entry, warrant, survey and patent. In making a land entry the
            > settler after choosing the land he desired to acquire would make application
            > to the appropriate land official describing the land he had chosen. The date
            > of entry is one of the best ways to prove a person's earliest apperance in
            > an area, unless he was a squatter. After the entry was made and no caveat
            > attached to it a warrant was issued by the proper authority to the County
            > Surveyor authorizing him to "admeasure and lay out" the lands for the
            > enterer as described. The surveyor would proceed to the area in question
            > with his instruments and survey the land., giving precise description of the
            > "metes and bounds" or boundry lines. He would also draw a small plat of the
            > survey including the scale he used, usually given in the number of poles or
            > chains to the inch..
            > On these surveys researchers will ofetn find the names of individuals who
            > helped the surveyor by dragging the s
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >

            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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