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EDWARD TRANTER

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  • Bill Kittrell
    Someone ask about Tranters Creek and how it got its name. I was looking through some deeds abstracted by Ysobel Litchfield and found the following. It doesn t
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 17, 2006
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      Someone ask about Tranters Creek and how it got its name. I was looking through some deeds abstracted by Ysobel Litchfield and found the following.
      It doesn't answer the question about the creek but it gives us an early
      Tranter name.

      Source: Beaufort County Deeds Book 1
      Date not shown, feel it was 1708
      Edward TRANTER'S patent of 340 acres lying on Fork between two creeks where helives, listed. Mentions Herring run creek, Beaver Dam

      Feb 10, 1706
      Edward TRANTER assigns title to above patent to John Clark.
      Witness: Samuel Slocumb.

      Dec 13, 1708/9
      John Clark assigns said patent to Thomas Husband. Witness: Edward TRANTER, Richard Smith. Acknowledge at court at Bath Town Jan 4, 1708/9.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bob Forbes
      Bill - Having spent some of the best days of my boyhood in Tranter s Creek fishing w/ my Dad, I ve often wondered about the origin of its name too, and really
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 18, 2006
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        Bill - Having spent some of the best days of my boyhood in Tranter's Creek fishing w/ my Dad, I've often wondered about the origin of its name too, and really appreciate your research. Reviewing the string of deeds you cited below, I have a couple of comments and maybe a speculation. First, I think it's very likely that the first deed cited below is really dated 1705 rather than 1708. It implies that Edward Tranter was the first one to receive a patent on the land from Lord Granville, since it does not mention a prior owner... but it mentions a couple of landmarks -- Herring Run and Beaver Dam (BTW, if I had a dollar for every place named Beaver Dam, I'd no longer have to work for a living:-). Then the very next year (1706), Tranter assigned the patent to John Clark. Then it was only a couple of years after that (1708/9), that John Clark assigned same patent to Thomas Husband, with Edward Tranter and Richard Smith as witnesses. So here are a couple of my speculations based on these land transfers:

        Looking at a map of the mouth of Tranter's Creek as it enters the Tar River, we see several smaller creeks branching out. It's the one to the south of the main branch that I believe is referred to in the first deed below, due to the name of the next owner of that land, John Clark. This area of land has been called "Clark's Neck" for many years, and the road running through it is still called "Clark's Neck Road." It's also interesting that the next deed shows Richard Smith as a witness, for he owned a large plantation just west of that area (north side of river across from Grimesland), which is where John Lawson ended his famous Journey thru the Carolinas in 1701. Lawson spent some time in Richard Smith's home, recuperating and probably completing his extensiive journal there. It was also apparently long enough for him to woo Mr. Smith's daugher, Hannah, for as far as we can tell, they were lovers up until the time of Lawson's untimely death at the hands of the Tuscaroras in 1711. If I'm not mistaken, she had a child by him, and I think she received at least part of his estate, having proved their close relationship with correspondence, etc. I'm going by memory here and don't have time right now for more research... would be pleased if someone else were to chime in at this point...

        In any case, Bill, I think you have pretty much confirmed the origin of the name Tranter's Creek, after one of the first European landowners in the area, as so many names of places in eastern NC seem to originate unless the Indian name was preserved.. It's also interesting to me that the surname "Tranter" pretty much vanishes from the area after the early 1700's. If it morphed into another spelling, I'm at a loss to guess what that might be!

        Bob Forbes
        bforbes@...


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Bill Kittrell
        To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, December 17, 2006 9:40 PM
        Subject: [genpcncfir] EDWARD TRANTER


        Someone ask about Tranters Creek and how it got its name. I was looking through some deeds abstracted by Ysobel Litchfield and found the following.
        It doesn't answer the question about the creek but it gives us an early
        Tranter name.

        Source: Beaufort County Deeds Book 1
        Date not shown, feel it was 1708
        Edward TRANTER'S patent of 340 acres lying on Fork between two creeks where helives, listed. Mentions Herring run creek, Beaver Dam

        Feb 10, 1706
        Edward TRANTER assigns title to above patent to John Clark.
        Witness: Samuel Slocumb.

        Dec 13, 1708/9
        John Clark assigns said patent to Thomas Husband. Witness: Edward TRANTER, Richard Smith. Acknowledge at court at Bath Town Jan 4, 1708/9.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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