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Re: [genpcncfir] Writing & publishing..

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  • Carol Singh
    Dear Faye, Okay! It s on! Thanks. Later, Carol ... === message truncated ===
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 13, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Faye,
      Okay! It's on! Thanks.
      Later, Carol
      --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

      > Carol,
      >
      > Just write like you do to us. It's that simple and
      > beautiful.
      >
      > :)
      >
      > Tootles,
      > Faye
      >
      >
      > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Dear Bob,
      > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's easier,
      > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to
      > > publish
      > > cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
      > > doesn't
      > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is, given
      > > the
      > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
      > > To date I've published academic articles and
      > had
      > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or
      > > commend
      > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I have
      > > never submitted anything anywhere else except for
      > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so few
      > > and
      > > far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
      > > rejection slips.
      > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a writer
      > > has
      > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
      > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
      > learned
      > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
      > > audience
      > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind and
      > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our
      > > common
      > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
      > beyond
      > > that of their roots.
      > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look Homeward,
      > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
      > > In recent months, several of our Tarheels have
      > > won
      > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their novels.
      > I
      > > do
      > > think that I can capture that, but differently or
      > in
      > > any case effectively enough that an editor
      > wouldn't
      > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a sure
      > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know. I've
      > > been
      > > working on that.
      > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had amazing
      > > runs.
      > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
      > > In writing about family, I simply write from
      > the
      > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I
      > don't
      > > actually go with a plan but with an experience.
      > > Consistently, I try to write so that my reader has
      > > an
      > > experience. I work from the inside out, not from
      > the
      > > outside in. I play with distance like a camera:
      > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase. I
      > have
      > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's the
      > > same
      > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so
      > that
      > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no place
      > > else but there.
      > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You Being
      > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning. The
      > > semester is over.
      > > I can celebrate and put together a manuscript.
      > I
      > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I will
      > > knock
      > > myself out.
      > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts already. I
      > > wasn't really satisfied with them.
      > > I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's see
      > > what I can do.
      > > Later, Carol
      > > --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have told
      > a
      > > > number of stories over the years in these posts
      > > that
      > > > I could see being woven into a book, with the
      > help
      > > > of a good editor and publisher. I would envision
      > a
      > > > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama and
      > > Uncle
      > > > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter,
      > catchier.
      > >
      > > > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
      > > > accomplished writers, and might be willing to
      > > review
      > > > a draft manuscript... give you some pointers.
      > But
      > > > finding a publisher -- that's a whole different
      > > > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if not a
      > > > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out every
      > > DAY,
      > > > looking for a publisher. I know some writers who
      > > > have worked on the craft all their lives and
      > still
      > > > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the
      > > expense
      > > > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing is
      > > > becoming an easier task for those who are
      > willing
      > > to
      > > > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally
      > > amounts
      > > > to several thousand dollars to do it right. One
      > > > thing I've found out by following the careers of
      > a
      > > > few writer friends and relatives -- the world of
      > > > professional writing is very competitive and not
      > > > very kind!
      > > > Bob Forbes
      > > > bforbes@...
      > > >
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: Carol Singh
      > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 7:34 PM
      > > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] A man's Christmas
      > > > passages....
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Dear Faye,
      > > > It's so generous of you to share your
      > thoughts.
      > > > Thank you very much.
      > > > Mama and Uncle Mark were incredibly strong and
      > > > wise. I always felt I was lacking that special
      > > > something that they had--compassion,
      > > selflessness,
      > > > and
      > > > wisdom. With the wisdom came self-examination
      > > and
      > > > self-knowledge, the ability to ask questions
      > and
      > > > to
      > > > lose without demeaning oneself--equating
      > losing
      > > > with
      > > > being a loser. Even yet, I continue to work on
      > > > those
      > > > last ones. What was so natural for Mama and
      > > Uncle
      > > > Mark
      > > > were so unnatural for me.
      > > > I think the difference was that I wanted more
      > > than
      > > > anything for them to be proud of me, and I
      > > equated
      > > > that with never having to say "I don't know."
      > > > What I did not understand from the very
      > > beginning
      > > > was that they were proud of me. I did not have
      > > to
      > > > "make" them proud of me.
      > > > Because of my feelings, I walked a very
      > careful
      > > > path with my own children, perhaps too careful
      > a
      > > > path.
      > > > I was fearful that they would love me too much
      > > and
      > > > think me much stronger and wiser than I
      > actually
      > > > was.
      > > > If they did, then they might think less of
      > > > themselves
      > > > and of their abilities.
      > > > What happened was their thinking I didn't care
      > > > about them, that I lived in the world of
      > ideas.
      > > > The
      > > > truth was very different.
      > > > I enjoyed ideas. I loved people and loved them
      > > for
      > > > themselves, not for their ideas.
      > > > I do not know if where you are there is the
      > t.v.
      >
      === message truncated ===




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    • Faye Silliman
      I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in the movie. ... === message truncated ===
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 13, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in the
        movie.


        --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

        > Dear Faye,
        > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
        > Later, Carol
        > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Carol,
        > >
        > > Just write like you do to us. It's that simple
        > and
        > > beautiful.
        > >
        > > :)
        > >
        > > Tootles,
        > > Faye
        > >
        > >
        > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > > Dear Bob,
        > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
        > easier,
        > > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to
        > > > publish
        > > > cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
        > > > doesn't
        > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is,
        > given
        > > > the
        > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
        > > > To date I've published academic articles and
        > > had
        > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or
        > > > commend
        > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I
        > have
        > > > never submitted anything anywhere else except
        > for
        > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so
        > few
        > > > and
        > > > far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
        > > > rejection slips.
        > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
        > writer
        > > > has
        > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
        > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
        > > learned
        > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
        > > > audience
        > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind
        > and
        > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our
        > > > common
        > > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
        > > beyond
        > > > that of their roots.
        > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
        > Homeward,
        > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
        > > > In recent months, several of our Tarheels
        > have
        > > > won
        > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
        > novels.
        > > I
        > > > do
        > > > think that I can capture that, but differently
        > or
        > > in
        > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
        > > wouldn't
        > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a sure
        > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know.
        > I've
        > > > been
        > > > working on that.
        > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had amazing
        > > > runs.
        > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
        > > > In writing about family, I simply write from
        > > the
        > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I
        > > don't
        > > > actually go with a plan but with an experience.
        > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my reader
        > has
        > > > an
        > > > experience. I work from the inside out, not from
        > > the
        > > > outside in. I play with distance like a camera:
        > > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase. I
        > > have
        > > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's the
        > > > same
        > > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so
        > > that
        > > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no
        > place
        > > > else but there.
        > > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You
        > Being
        > > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning.
        > The
        > > > semester is over.
        > > > I can celebrate and put together a
        > manuscript.
        > > I
        > > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I will
        > > > knock
        > > > myself out.
        > > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts already.
        > I
        > > > wasn't really satisfied with them.
        > > > I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's
        > see
        > > > what I can do.
        > > > Later, Carol
        > > > --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have
        > told
        > > a
        > > > > number of stories over the years in these
        > posts
        > > > that
        > > > > I could see being woven into a book, with the
        > > help
        > > > > of a good editor and publisher. I would
        > envision
        > > a
        > > > > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama and
        > > > Uncle
        > > > > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter,
        > > catchier.
        > > >
        > > > > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
        > > > > accomplished writers, and might be willing to
        > > > review
        > > > > a draft manuscript... give you some pointers.
        > > But
        > > > > finding a publisher -- that's a whole
        > different
        > > > > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if not
        > a
        > > > > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out
        > every
        > > > DAY,
        > > > > looking for a publisher. I know some writers
        > who
        > > > > have worked on the craft all their lives and
        > > still
        > > > > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the
        > > > expense
        > > > > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing
        > is
        > > > > becoming an easier task for those who are
        > > willing
        > > > to
        > > > > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally
        > > > amounts
        > > > > to several thousand dollars to do it right.
        > One
        > > > > thing I've found out by following the careers
        > of
        > > a
        > > > > few writer friends and relatives -- the world
        > of
        > > > > professional writing is very competitive and
        > not
        > > > > very kind!
        > > > > Bob Forbes
        > > > > bforbes@...
        > > > >
        > > > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > > > From: Carol Singh
        > > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 7:34 PM
        > > > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] A man's Christmas
        > > > > passages....
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Dear Faye,
        > > > > It's so generous of you to share your
        > > thoughts.
        > > > > Thank you very much.
        > > > > Mama and Uncle Mark were incredibly strong
        > and
        > > > > wise. I always felt I was lacking that
        > special
        > > > > something that they had--compassion,
        > > > selflessness,
        > > > > and
        > > > > wisdom. With the wisdom came
        > self-examination
        > > > and
        > > > > self-knowledge, the ability to ask questions
        > > and
        > > > > to
        >
        === message truncated ===




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      • Carol Singh
        Dear Faye, It will be an honor to have you portray Mama. Not having had any volunteers for the part and considering women who had played similar roles in the
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 14, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Faye,
          It will be an honor to have you portray Mama. Not
          having had any volunteers for the part and considering
          women who had played similar roles in the past, I was
          considering Julia Roberts for Mama and Robin Williams
          for Uncle Mark.
          Along with their complexity, kindness, and wisdom,
          both had a certain sense of humor as well as charm.
          Julia Roberts comes across as an incredible lady.
          Robin Williams has versatility that just won't quit.
          Mama's fastidiousness, never even close to
          peculiarity or compulsiveness, and her vivaciousness
          also come across in Julia Roberts.
          In My Best Friend's Wedding, Julia exhibits some of
          the zaniness of the Auntie Mame of Patrick Dennis, and
          Mama was like that, too. However, in circumstances
          like those of Julia in Wedding, she would never have
          behaved like that. She was above that. She was more
          like Jackie Kennedy. She kept her dignity without the
          remote possibility of being mistaken for a shrew or a
          snob.
          Finally, Mama was the most down-to-earth without
          being "earthy" person anyone would ever want to meet.
          Uncle Mark was the same way. Both felt strongly that a
          person's worth was part and parcel of his self-respect
          and his conduct toward other people, not in what he
          had or who he was.
          In my own walk through life, I have tried to follow
          their path.
          As for autograph, it's yours, along with the role.
          Another of our group would make a wonderful Uncle
          Mark, now that you've got me thinking. I'll let you
          know if I get a volunteer!
          Later, Carol


          --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

          > I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in
          > the
          > movie.
          >
          >
          > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Dear Faye,
          > > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
          > > Later, Carol
          > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > > Carol,
          > > >
          > > > Just write like you do to us. It's that simple
          > > and
          > > > beautiful.
          > > >
          > > > :)
          > > >
          > > > Tootles,
          > > > Faye
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > > Dear Bob,
          > > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
          > > easier,
          > > > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to
          > > > > publish
          > > > > cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
          > > > > doesn't
          > > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is,
          > > given
          > > > > the
          > > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
          > > > > To date I've published academic articles
          > and
          > > > had
          > > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or
          > > > > commend
          > > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I
          > > have
          > > > > never submitted anything anywhere else except
          > > for
          > > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so
          > > few
          > > > > and
          > > > > far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
          > > > > rejection slips.
          > > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
          > > writer
          > > > > has
          > > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
          > > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
          > > > learned
          > > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
          > > > > audience
          > > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind
          > > and
          > > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our
          > > > > common
          > > > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
          > > > beyond
          > > > > that of their roots.
          > > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
          > > Homeward,
          > > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
          > > > > In recent months, several of our Tarheels
          > > have
          > > > > won
          > > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
          > > novels.
          > > > I
          > > > > do
          > > > > think that I can capture that, but differently
          > > or
          > > > in
          > > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
          > > > wouldn't
          > > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a
          > sure
          > > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know.
          > > I've
          > > > > been
          > > > > working on that.
          > > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had
          > amazing
          > > > > runs.
          > > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
          > > > > In writing about family, I simply write
          > from
          > > > the
          > > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I
          > > > don't
          > > > > actually go with a plan but with an
          > experience.
          > > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my reader
          > > has
          > > > > an
          > > > > experience. I work from the inside out, not
          > from
          > > > the
          > > > > outside in. I play with distance like a
          > camera:
          > > > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase.
          > I
          > > > have
          > > > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's
          > the
          > > > > same
          > > > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so
          > > > that
          > > > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no
          > > place
          > > > > else but there.
          > > > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You
          > > Being
          > > > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning.
          > > The
          > > > > semester is over.
          > > > > I can celebrate and put together a
          > > manuscript.
          > > > I
          > > > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I
          > will
          > > > > knock
          > > > > myself out.
          > > > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts
          > already.
          > > I
          > > > > wasn't really satisfied with them.
          > > > > I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's
          > > see
          > > > > what I can do.
          > > > > Later, Carol
          > > > > --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...>
          > wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have
          > > told
          > > > a
          > > > > > number of stories over the years in these
          > > posts
          > > > > that
          > > > > > I could see being woven into a book, with
          > the
          > > > help
          > > > > > of a good editor and publisher. I would
          > > envision
          > > > a
          > > > > > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama
          > and
          > > > > Uncle
          > > > > > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter,
          > > > catchier.
          > > > >
          > > > > > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
          > > > > > accomplished writers, and might be willing
          > to
          > > > > review
          > > > > > a draft manuscript... give you some
          > pointers.
          > > > But
          > > > > > finding a publisher -- that's a whole
          > > different
          > > > > > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if
          > not
          > > a
          > > > > > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out
          > > every
          > > > > DAY,
          > > > > > looking for a publisher. I know some writers
          > > who
          > > > > > have worked on the craft all their lives and
          > > > still
          > > > > > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the
          > > > > expense
          > > > > > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing
          > > is
          > > > > > becoming an easier task for those who are
          > > > willing
          > > > > to
          > > > > > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally
          > > > > amounts
          > > > > > to several thousand dollars to do it right.
          > > One
          > > > > > thing I've found out by following the
          > careers
          > > of
          > > > a
          > > > > > few writer friends and relatives -- the
          > world
          > > of
          > > > > > professional writing is very competitive and
          > > not
          > > > > > very kind!
          > > > > > Bob Forbes
          > > > > > bforbes@...
          >
          === message truncated ===




          ____________________________________________________________________________________
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        • Faye Silliman
          Hmmm....I look more like Robin Williams. ... === message truncated === ____________________________________________________________________________________ Do
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 14, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Hmmm....I look more like Robin Williams.


            --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

            > Dear Faye,
            > It will be an honor to have you portray Mama. Not
            > having had any volunteers for the part and
            > considering
            > women who had played similar roles in the past, I
            > was
            > considering Julia Roberts for Mama and Robin
            > Williams
            > for Uncle Mark.
            > Along with their complexity, kindness, and
            > wisdom,
            > both had a certain sense of humor as well as charm.
            > Julia Roberts comes across as an incredible lady.
            > Robin Williams has versatility that just won't quit.
            > Mama's fastidiousness, never even close to
            > peculiarity or compulsiveness, and her vivaciousness
            > also come across in Julia Roberts.
            > In My Best Friend's Wedding, Julia exhibits some
            > of
            > the zaniness of the Auntie Mame of Patrick Dennis,
            > and
            > Mama was like that, too. However, in circumstances
            > like those of Julia in Wedding, she would never have
            > behaved like that. She was above that. She was more
            > like Jackie Kennedy. She kept her dignity without
            > the
            > remote possibility of being mistaken for a shrew or
            > a
            > snob.
            > Finally, Mama was the most down-to-earth without
            > being "earthy" person anyone would ever want to
            > meet.
            > Uncle Mark was the same way. Both felt strongly that
            > a
            > person's worth was part and parcel of his
            > self-respect
            > and his conduct toward other people, not in what he
            > had or who he was.
            > In my own walk through life, I have tried to
            > follow
            > their path.
            > As for autograph, it's yours, along with the
            > role.
            > Another of our group would make a wonderful Uncle
            > Mark, now that you've got me thinking. I'll let you
            > know if I get a volunteer!
            > Later, Carol
            >
            >
            > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
            >
            > > I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in
            > > the
            > > movie.
            > >
            > >
            > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > > Dear Faye,
            > > > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
            > > > Later, Carol
            > > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > > Carol,
            > > > >
            > > > > Just write like you do to us. It's that
            > simple
            > > > and
            > > > > beautiful.
            > > > >
            > > > > :)
            > > > >
            > > > > Tootles,
            > > > > Faye
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
            > > > wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > > Dear Bob,
            > > > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
            > > > easier,
            > > > > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction,
            > to
            > > > > > publish
            > > > > > cookbooks than just about anything else.
            > But,
            > > > > > doesn't
            > > > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is,
            > > > given
            > > > > > the
            > > > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
            > > > > > To date I've published academic articles
            > > and
            > > > > had
            > > > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it,
            > or
            > > > > > commend
            > > > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I
            > > > have
            > > > > > never submitted anything anywhere else
            > except
            > > > for
            > > > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been
            > so
            > > > few
            > > > > > and
            > > > > > far between that I have garnered fewer than
            > 10
            > > > > > rejection slips.
            > > > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
            > > > writer
            > > > > > has
            > > > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
            > > > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
            > > > > learned
            > > > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
            > > > > > audience
            > > > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to
            > mind
            > > > and
            > > > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to
            > our
            > > > > > common
            > > > > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
            > > > > beyond
            > > > > > that of their roots.
            > > > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
            > > > Homeward,
            > > > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
            > > > > > In recent months, several of our
            > Tarheels
            > > > have
            > > > > > won
            > > > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
            > > > novels.
            > > > > I
            > > > > > do
            > > > > > think that I can capture that, but
            > differently
            > > > or
            > > > > in
            > > > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
            > > > > wouldn't
            > > > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a
            > > sure
            > > > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know.
            > > > I've
            > > > > > been
            > > > > > working on that.
            > > > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had
            > > amazing
            > > > > > runs.
            > > > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
            > > > > > In writing about family, I simply write
            > > from
            > > > > the
            > > > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II,
            > I
            > > > > don't
            > > > > > actually go with a plan but with an
            > > experience.
            > > > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my
            > reader
            > > > has
            > > > > > an
            > > > > > experience. I work from the inside out, not
            > > from
            > > > > the
            > > > > > outside in. I play with distance like a
            > > camera:
            > > > > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the
            > chase.
            > > I
            > > > > have
            > > > > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's
            > > the
            > > > > > same
            > > > > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out
            > so
            > > > > that
            > > > > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no
            > > > place
            > > > > > else but there.
            > > > > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You
            > > > Being
            > > > > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this
            > morning.
            > > > The
            > > > > > semester is over.
            > > > > > I can celebrate and put together a
            > > > manuscript.
            > > > > I
            > > > > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I
            > > will
            > > > > > knock
            > > > > > myself out.
            > > > > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts
            > > already.
            > > > I
            >
            === message truncated ===




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          • Carol Singh
            Dear Faye, Hey, that s great! What makes him so versatile is his incredibly expressive face. What he can t do with body language does not need to be done! I
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 18, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear Faye,
              Hey, that's great! What makes him so versatile is
              his incredibly expressive face. What he can't do with
              body language does not need to be done!
              I especially admired him in Mrs. Doubtfire! What a
              talent! He is one of the most gifted actors we have.
              Shakespeare would have loved him.
              Remember, too, that Shakespeare's women were
              played by men.
              It wasn't until the 18th century that we had women
              the likes of Mrs. Siddons.
              Later, Carol
              --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

              > Hmmm....I look more like Robin Williams.
              >
              >
              > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
              >
              > > Dear Faye,
              > > It will be an honor to have you portray Mama.
              > Not
              > > having had any volunteers for the part and
              > > considering
              > > women who had played similar roles in the past, I
              > > was
              > > considering Julia Roberts for Mama and Robin
              > > Williams
              > > for Uncle Mark.
              > > Along with their complexity, kindness, and
              > > wisdom,
              > > both had a certain sense of humor as well as
              > charm.
              > > Julia Roberts comes across as an incredible
              > lady.
              > > Robin Williams has versatility that just won't
              > quit.
              > > Mama's fastidiousness, never even close to
              > > peculiarity or compulsiveness, and her
              > vivaciousness
              > > also come across in Julia Roberts.
              > > In My Best Friend's Wedding, Julia exhibits
              > some
              > > of
              > > the zaniness of the Auntie Mame of Patrick Dennis,
              > > and
              > > Mama was like that, too. However, in circumstances
              > > like those of Julia in Wedding, she would never
              > have
              > > behaved like that. She was above that. She was
              > more
              > > like Jackie Kennedy. She kept her dignity without
              > > the
              > > remote possibility of being mistaken for a shrew
              > or
              > > a
              > > snob.
              > > Finally, Mama was the most down-to-earth
              > without
              > > being "earthy" person anyone would ever want to
              > > meet.
              > > Uncle Mark was the same way. Both felt strongly
              > that
              > > a
              > > person's worth was part and parcel of his
              > > self-respect
              > > and his conduct toward other people, not in what
              > he
              > > had or who he was.
              > > In my own walk through life, I have tried to
              > > follow
              > > their path.
              > > As for autograph, it's yours, along with the
              > > role.
              > > Another of our group would make a wonderful
              > Uncle
              > > Mark, now that you've got me thinking. I'll let
              > you
              > > know if I get a volunteer!
              > > Later, Carol
              > >
              > >
              > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > > I want an autographed copy and role as your mom
              > in
              > > > the
              > > > movie.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
              > > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > Dear Faye,
              > > > > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
              > > > > Later, Carol
              > > > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > > Carol,
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Just write like you do to us. It's that
              > > simple
              > > > > and
              > > > > > beautiful.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > :)
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Tootles,
              > > > > > Faye
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > > > --- Carol Singh
              > <csinghworthington@...>
              > > > > wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > > Dear Bob,
              > > > > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
              > > > > easier,
              > > > > > > though, to publish nonfiction than
              > fiction,
              > > to
              > > > > > > publish
              > > > > > > cookbooks than just about anything else.
              > > But,
              > > > > > > doesn't
              > > > > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That
              > is,
              > > > > given
              > > > > > > the
              > > > > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
              > > > > > > To date I've published academic
              > articles
              > > > and
              > > > > > had
              > > > > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it,
              > > or
              > > > > > > commend
              > > > > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However,
              > I
              > > > > have
              > > > > > > never submitted anything anywhere else
              > > except
              > > > > for
              > > > > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have
              > been
              > > so
              > > > > few
              > > > > > > and
              > > > > > > far between that I have garnered fewer
              > than
              > > 10
              > > > > > > rejection slips.
              > > > > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
              > > > > writer
              > > > > > > has
              > > > > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
              > > > > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger,
              > lessons
              > > > > > learned
              > > > > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a
              > special
              > > > > > > audience
              > > > > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to
              > > mind
              > > > > and
              > > > > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to
              > > our
              > > > > > > common
              > > > > > > humanity. The result is an audience far,
              > far
              > > > > > beyond
              > > > > > > that of their roots.
              > > > > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
              > > > > Homeward,
              > > > > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
              > > > > > > In recent months, several of our
              > > Tarheels
              > > > > have
              > > > > > > won
              > > > > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
              > > > > novels.
              > > > > > I
              > > > > > > do
              > > > > > > think that I can capture that, but
              > > differently
              > > > > or
              > > > > > in
              > > > > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
              > > > > > wouldn't
              > > > > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a
              > > > sure
              > > > > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't
              > know.
              > > > > I've
              > > > > > > been
              > > > > > > working on that.
              > > > > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had
              > > > amazing
              > > > > > > runs.
              > > > > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
              > > > > > > In writing about family, I simply
              > write
              > > > from
              > > > > > the
              > > > > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles
              > II,
              > > I
              > > > > > don't
              > > > > > > actually go with a plan but with an
              > > > experience.
              > > > > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my
              > > reader
              > > > > has
              > > > > > > an
              > > > > > > experience. I work from the inside out,
              > not
              >
              === message truncated ===


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