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  • Bob Forbes
    Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have told a number of stories over the years in these posts that I could see being woven into a book, with the help of a
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 12, 2006
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      Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have told a number of stories over the years in these posts that I could see being woven into a book, with the help of a good editor and publisher. I would envision a title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama and Uncle Mark" or perhaps something even shorter, catchier. I have a couple of relatives who are fairly accomplished writers, and might be willing to review a draft manuscript... give you some pointers. But finding a publisher -- that's a whole different matter. I'm told that several hundred (if not a thousand or two) new manuscripts come out every DAY, looking for a publisher. I know some writers who have worked on the craft all their lives and still cannot find a publisher willing to risk the expense of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing is becoming an easier task for those who are willing to risk some of their own $$ -- what generally amounts to several thousand dollars to do it right. One thing I've found out by following the careers of a few writer friends and relatives -- the world of professional writing is very competitive and not very kind!
      Bob Forbes
      bforbes@...

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Carol Singh
      To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 7:34 PM
      Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] A man's Christmas passages....


      Dear Faye,
      It's so generous of you to share your thoughts.
      Thank you very much.
      Mama and Uncle Mark were incredibly strong and
      wise. I always felt I was lacking that special
      something that they had--compassion, selflessness, and
      wisdom. With the wisdom came self-examination and
      self-knowledge, the ability to ask questions and to
      lose without demeaning oneself--equating losing with
      being a loser. Even yet, I continue to work on those
      last ones. What was so natural for Mama and Uncle Mark
      were so unnatural for me.
      I think the difference was that I wanted more than
      anything for them to be proud of me, and I equated
      that with never having to say "I don't know."
      What I did not understand from the very beginning
      was that they were proud of me. I did not have to
      "make" them proud of me.
      Because of my feelings, I walked a very careful
      path with my own children, perhaps too careful a path.
      I was fearful that they would love me too much and
      think me much stronger and wiser than I actually was.
      If they did, then they might think less of themselves
      and of their abilities.
      What happened was their thinking I didn't care
      about them, that I lived in the world of ideas. The
      truth was very different.
      I enjoyed ideas. I loved people and loved them for
      themselves, not for their ideas.
      I do not know if where you are there is the t.v.
      program called "Numbers." It's about Charlie, a
      mathematics professor, and his brother an F.B.I.
      agent. Charlie is a genius who uses math to solve
      crimes for his brother.
      He represses his feelings because he is
      uncomfortable with them. He is uncomfortable with them
      because he doesn't trust them. He can't prove them. He
      has nothing to measure them against. He comes close to
      our idea of the "mad scientist" who is a recluse. My
      children still think of me like that, but I am so not
      like that.
      True, when working on something, I am incredibly
      focused, but not at all like Charlie where it's normal
      for him to be "in his shell," as Mama called it.
      So, all this leads to why I wanted to give my own
      family the magic of Christmas.
      At least for my son, who is my first born, I know
      from his special phone call to me last night that I
      succeeded.
      I am beginning to see signs in my daughter, a new
      mother with her own little girl. After long years,
      that's encouraging.
      Later, Carol
      --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

      > You must write all this down and publish, my dear.
      > What a beautiful story.
      >
      > May be that we all have a special holiday story to
      > share.
      >
      > Thank you.
      >
      > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Dear Bob,
      > > This is absolutely wonderful! Since my
      > brother's
      > > once coppper colored beard has turned snow white,
      > my
      > > jovial brother can easily pass for Santa.
      > > From a feminine perspective, the story has a
      > > different slant.
      > > The day I awakened and realized that I was
      > Santa
      > > was the first Christmas after my marriage when I
      > no
      > > longer stirred on Christmas morning to the magic
      > and
      > > mystery of Christmas with Mama and Uncle Mark.
      > > Of course at the age of 25 years, I knew that a
      > > human, or an elf at least, helped Santa make
      > > Christmas
      > > dreams come true. Still, both Mama and Uncle Mark
      > > could stretch a dollar further than anyone I have
      > > ever
      > > known. Our living room was always a wonder to
      > behold
      > > on Christmas morning.
      > > In the days before my first Christmas in my own
      > > home, I woke up thinking how precious it would be
      > to
      > > capture that specialness for my new family at
      > > Christmas. That was when I realized in a very
      > > different way that Santa is real and that he had
      > > passed on to me the legacy of keeping the spirit
      > > alive
      > > and of making dreams come true.
      > > I learned that Christmas was far more than
      > things
      > > the Christmas of 1961 when someone set fire to our
      > > house, and we lost every thing we had, but
      > > thankfully,
      > > we still had one another.
      > > Mama was in the hospital recovering from yet
      > > another
      > > surgery following her diagnosis of metastatic
      > > uterine
      > > cancer three years earlier. The previous year our
      > > stepfather had had a massive heart attack the week
      > > before Thanksgiving and died before the rescue
      > squad
      > > could reach the house in the driving sleet.
      > > Still only a few days post-op, Mama was too weak
      > > even to stand on her feet. Our uncle was home
      > > recovering from t.b. following his release from
      > the
      > > sanitarium after an 18-month stay, but had seen
      > the
      > > flames from the safety of the kitchen in time to
      > > escape the fire.
      > > When kind neighbors drove me to the hospital to
      > > find
      > > Mama distraught as I was the only one unaccounted
      > > for,
      > > I was touched my her belief that I had run back
      > into
      > > the house to save the jewelry she had bought for
      > me
      > > through the years.
      > > In the midst of our pain over being homeless, we
      > > came to know one another as we had never before
      > > done.
      > > Mama's lessons on the value of things had indeed
      > > been
      > > passed on to her daughter. What mattered to me
      > was
      > > having Mama, not the things she had given me.
      > > For me, that was a life altering event. At
      > > Christmas especially, each one of us embodies the
      > > spirit of Santa. Through us, Santa, too, will
      > always
      > > be with us.
      > > By the way, a neighbor's son, a close friend of
      > > my
      > > brother, had saved my jewelry. Despite Uncle
      > Mark's
      > > pleas, he had grabbed a ladder from the workshop
      > and
      > > climbed onto the roof of the burning house to
      > break
      > > into my room and snatch my jewelry box. Can you
      > > imagine that?
      > > Later, Carol
      > > --- "bforbes@..."
      > > <bforbes@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > In reply to:
      > > >
      > > > "I have not heard about the 4 stages of a man's
      > > life
      > > > related to Santa.
      > > > Please tell.
      > > > suzanne"
      > > >
      > > > OK, well, there are really only 4 stages to a
      > > man's
      > > > life, and all of them
      > > > seem to revolve around Christmas:
      > > >
      > > > Stage 1 - He BELIEVES in Santa Claus :-)
      > > >
      > > > Stage 2 - He NO LONGER BELIEVES in Santa :-(
      > > >
      > > > Stage 3 - He realizes he IS Santa <;-)>
      > > >
      > > > Stage 4 - He looks MORE & MORE LIKE Santa every
      > > year
      > > > <:-)>>>
      > > >
      > > > I believe I'm somewhere between Stages 3 and
      > 4....
      > >
      > > >
      > > > bforbes@...
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      ----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > mail2web - Check your email from the web at
      > > > http://mail2web.com/ .
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      __________________________________________________________
      > > Need a quick answer? Get one in minutes from
      > people
      > > who know.
      > > Ask your question on www.Answers.yahoo.com
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      __________________________________________________________
      > Want to start your own business?
      > Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.
      > http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/r-index
      >

      __________________________________________________________
      Have a burning question?
      Go to www.Answers.yahoo.com and get answers from real people who know.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carol Singh
      Dear Bob, Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It s easier, though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to publish cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 12, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Bob,
        Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's easier,
        though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to publish
        cookbooks than just about anything else. But, doesn't
        the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is, given the
        media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
        To date I've published academic articles and had
        newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or commend
        me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I have
        never submitted anything anywhere else except for
        poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so few and
        far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
        rejection slips.
        When it comes to writing on oneself, a writer has
        to hit a common chord in a very broad
        audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons learned
        or to aim at the other extreme for a special audience
        like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind and
        Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our common
        humanity. The result is an audience far, far beyond
        that of their roots.
        A Tarheel example is the novel Look Homeward,
        Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
        In recent months, several of our Tarheels have won
        acclaim for the "sense of place" in their novels. I do
        think that I can capture that, but differently or in
        any case effectively enough that an editor wouldn't
        ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a sure
        winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know. I've been
        working on that.
        Essayists like Joan Didion have had amazing runs.
        I've been astounded at it, still am.
        In writing about family, I simply write from the
        heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I don't
        actually go with a plan but with an experience.
        Consistently, I try to write so that my reader has an
        experience. I work from the inside out, not from the
        outside in. I play with distance like a camera:
        close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase. I have
        fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's the same
        with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so that
        they will want to be there, maybe even be no place
        else but there.
        Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You Being
        Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning. The
        semester is over.
        I can celebrate and put together a manuscript. I
        promise you, though, that whatever it is, I will knock
        myself out.
        I've tossed out a couple of drafts already. I
        wasn't really satisfied with them.
        I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's see
        what I can do.
        Later, Carol
        --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...> wrote:

        > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have told a
        > number of stories over the years in these posts that
        > I could see being woven into a book, with the help
        > of a good editor and publisher. I would envision a
        > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama and Uncle
        > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter, catchier.
        > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
        > accomplished writers, and might be willing to review
        > a draft manuscript... give you some pointers. But
        > finding a publisher -- that's a whole different
        > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if not a
        > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out every DAY,
        > looking for a publisher. I know some writers who
        > have worked on the craft all their lives and still
        > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the expense
        > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing is
        > becoming an easier task for those who are willing to
        > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally amounts
        > to several thousand dollars to do it right. One
        > thing I've found out by following the careers of a
        > few writer friends and relatives -- the world of
        > professional writing is very competitive and not
        > very kind!
        > Bob Forbes
        > bforbes@...
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Carol Singh
        > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 7:34 PM
        > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] A man's Christmas
        > passages....
        >
        >
        > Dear Faye,
        > It's so generous of you to share your thoughts.
        > Thank you very much.
        > Mama and Uncle Mark were incredibly strong and
        > wise. I always felt I was lacking that special
        > something that they had--compassion, selflessness,
        > and
        > wisdom. With the wisdom came self-examination and
        > self-knowledge, the ability to ask questions and
        > to
        > lose without demeaning oneself--equating losing
        > with
        > being a loser. Even yet, I continue to work on
        > those
        > last ones. What was so natural for Mama and Uncle
        > Mark
        > were so unnatural for me.
        > I think the difference was that I wanted more than
        > anything for them to be proud of me, and I equated
        > that with never having to say "I don't know."
        > What I did not understand from the very beginning
        > was that they were proud of me. I did not have to
        > "make" them proud of me.
        > Because of my feelings, I walked a very careful
        > path with my own children, perhaps too careful a
        > path.
        > I was fearful that they would love me too much and
        > think me much stronger and wiser than I actually
        > was.
        > If they did, then they might think less of
        > themselves
        > and of their abilities.
        > What happened was their thinking I didn't care
        > about them, that I lived in the world of ideas.
        > The
        > truth was very different.
        > I enjoyed ideas. I loved people and loved them for
        > themselves, not for their ideas.
        > I do not know if where you are there is the t.v.
        > program called "Numbers." It's about Charlie, a
        > mathematics professor, and his brother an F.B.I.
        > agent. Charlie is a genius who uses math to solve
        > crimes for his brother.
        > He represses his feelings because he is
        > uncomfortable with them. He is uncomfortable with
        > them
        > because he doesn't trust them. He can't prove
        > them. He
        > has nothing to measure them against. He comes
        > close to
        > our idea of the "mad scientist" who is a recluse.
        > My
        > children still think of me like that, but I am so
        > not
        > like that.
        > True, when working on something, I am incredibly
        > focused, but not at all like Charlie where it's
        > normal
        > for him to be "in his shell," as Mama called it.
        > So, all this leads to why I wanted to give my own
        > family the magic of Christmas.
        > At least for my son, who is my first born, I know
        > from his special phone call to me last night that
        > I
        > succeeded.
        > I am beginning to see signs in my daughter, a new
        > mother with her own little girl. After long years,
        > that's encouraging.
        > Later, Carol
        > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
        >
        > > You must write all this down and publish, my
        > dear.
        > > What a beautiful story.
        > >
        > > May be that we all have a special holiday story
        > to
        > > share.
        > >
        > > Thank you.
        > >
        > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > > Dear Bob,
        > > > This is absolutely wonderful! Since my
        > > brother's
        > > > once coppper colored beard has turned snow
        > white,
        > > my
        > > > jovial brother can easily pass for Santa.
        > > > From a feminine perspective, the story has a
        > > > different slant.
        > > > The day I awakened and realized that I was
        > > Santa
        > > > was the first Christmas after my marriage when
        > I
        > > no
        > > > longer stirred on Christmas morning to the
        > magic
        > > and
        > > > mystery of Christmas with Mama and Uncle Mark.
        > > > Of course at the age of 25 years, I knew that
        > a
        > > > human, or an elf at least, helped Santa make
        > > > Christmas
        > > > dreams come true. Still, both Mama and Uncle
        > Mark
        > > > could stretch a dollar further than anyone I
        > have
        > > > ever
        > > > known. Our living room was always a wonder to
        > > behold
        > > > on Christmas morning.
        > > > In the days before my first Christmas in my
        > own
        > > > home, I woke up thinking how precious it would
        > be
        > > to
        > > > capture that specialness for my new family at
        > > > Christmas. That was when I realized in a very
        > > > different way that Santa is real and that he
        > had
        > > > passed on to me the legacy of keeping the
        > spirit
        > > > alive
        > > > and of making dreams come true.
        > > > I learned that Christmas was far more than
        > > things
        > > > the Christmas of 1961 when someone set fire to
        > our
        > > > house, and we lost every thing we had, but
        > > > thankfully,
        > > > we still had one another.
        > > > Mama was in the hospital recovering from yet
        > > > another
        > > > surgery following her diagnosis of metastatic
        > > > uterine
        > > > cancer three years earlier. The previous year
        > our
        > > > stepfather had had a massive heart attack the
        > week
        > > > before Thanksgiving and died before the rescue
        > > squad
        > > > could reach the house in the driving sleet.
        > > > Still only a few days post-op, Mama was too
        > weak
        > > > even to stand on her feet. Our uncle was home
        > > > recovering from t.b. following his release
        > from
        > > the
        > > > sanitarium after an 18-month stay, but had
        > seen
        > > the
        > > > flames from the safety of the kitchen in time
        > to
        > > > escape the fire.
        > > > When kind neighbors drove me to the hospital
        > to
        > > > find
        > > > Mama distraught as I was the only one
        > unaccounted
        > > > for,
        > > > I was touched my her belief that I had run
        > back
        > > into
        > > > the house to save the jewelry she had bought
        > for
        >
        === message truncated ===




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      • Faye Silliman
        Carol, Just write like you do to us. It s that simple and beautiful. ... Tootles, Faye ... === message truncated ===
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 12, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Carol,

          Just write like you do to us. It's that simple and
          beautiful.

          :)

          Tootles,
          Faye


          --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

          > Dear Bob,
          > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's easier,
          > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to
          > publish
          > cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
          > doesn't
          > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is, given
          > the
          > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
          > To date I've published academic articles and had
          > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or
          > commend
          > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I have
          > never submitted anything anywhere else except for
          > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so few
          > and
          > far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
          > rejection slips.
          > When it comes to writing on oneself, a writer
          > has
          > to hit a common chord in a very broad
          > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons learned
          > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
          > audience
          > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind and
          > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our
          > common
          > humanity. The result is an audience far, far beyond
          > that of their roots.
          > A Tarheel example is the novel Look Homeward,
          > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
          > In recent months, several of our Tarheels have
          > won
          > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their novels. I
          > do
          > think that I can capture that, but differently or in
          > any case effectively enough that an editor wouldn't
          > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a sure
          > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know. I've
          > been
          > working on that.
          > Essayists like Joan Didion have had amazing
          > runs.
          > I've been astounded at it, still am.
          > In writing about family, I simply write from the
          > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I don't
          > actually go with a plan but with an experience.
          > Consistently, I try to write so that my reader has
          > an
          > experience. I work from the inside out, not from the
          > outside in. I play with distance like a camera:
          > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase. I have
          > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's the
          > same
          > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so that
          > they will want to be there, maybe even be no place
          > else but there.
          > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You Being
          > Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning. The
          > semester is over.
          > I can celebrate and put together a manuscript. I
          > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I will
          > knock
          > myself out.
          > I've tossed out a couple of drafts already. I
          > wasn't really satisfied with them.
          > I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's see
          > what I can do.
          > Later, Carol
          > --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have told a
          > > number of stories over the years in these posts
          > that
          > > I could see being woven into a book, with the help
          > > of a good editor and publisher. I would envision a
          > > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama and
          > Uncle
          > > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter, catchier.
          >
          > > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
          > > accomplished writers, and might be willing to
          > review
          > > a draft manuscript... give you some pointers. But
          > > finding a publisher -- that's a whole different
          > > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if not a
          > > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out every
          > DAY,
          > > looking for a publisher. I know some writers who
          > > have worked on the craft all their lives and still
          > > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the
          > expense
          > > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing is
          > > becoming an easier task for those who are willing
          > to
          > > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally
          > amounts
          > > to several thousand dollars to do it right. One
          > > thing I've found out by following the careers of a
          > > few writer friends and relatives -- the world of
          > > professional writing is very competitive and not
          > > very kind!
          > > Bob Forbes
          > > bforbes@...
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: Carol Singh
          > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 7:34 PM
          > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] A man's Christmas
          > > passages....
          > >
          > >
          > > Dear Faye,
          > > It's so generous of you to share your thoughts.
          > > Thank you very much.
          > > Mama and Uncle Mark were incredibly strong and
          > > wise. I always felt I was lacking that special
          > > something that they had--compassion,
          > selflessness,
          > > and
          > > wisdom. With the wisdom came self-examination
          > and
          > > self-knowledge, the ability to ask questions and
          > > to
          > > lose without demeaning oneself--equating losing
          > > with
          > > being a loser. Even yet, I continue to work on
          > > those
          > > last ones. What was so natural for Mama and
          > Uncle
          > > Mark
          > > were so unnatural for me.
          > > I think the difference was that I wanted more
          > than
          > > anything for them to be proud of me, and I
          > equated
          > > that with never having to say "I don't know."
          > > What I did not understand from the very
          > beginning
          > > was that they were proud of me. I did not have
          > to
          > > "make" them proud of me.
          > > Because of my feelings, I walked a very careful
          > > path with my own children, perhaps too careful a
          > > path.
          > > I was fearful that they would love me too much
          > and
          > > think me much stronger and wiser than I actually
          > > was.
          > > If they did, then they might think less of
          > > themselves
          > > and of their abilities.
          > > What happened was their thinking I didn't care
          > > about them, that I lived in the world of ideas.
          > > The
          > > truth was very different.
          > > I enjoyed ideas. I loved people and loved them
          > for
          > > themselves, not for their ideas.
          > > I do not know if where you are there is the t.v.
          > > program called "Numbers." It's about Charlie, a
          > > mathematics professor, and his brother an F.B.I.
          > > agent. Charlie is a genius who uses math to
          > solve
          > > crimes for his brother.
          > > He represses his feelings because he is
          > > uncomfortable with them. He is uncomfortable
          > with
          > > them
          > > because he doesn't trust them. He can't prove
          > > them. He
          > > has nothing to measure them against. He comes
          > > close to
          > > our idea of the "mad scientist" who is a
          > recluse.
          > > My
          > > children still think of me like that, but I am
          > so
          > > not
          > > like that.
          > > True, when working on something, I am incredibly
          > > focused, but not at all like Charlie where it's
          > > normal
          > > for him to be "in his shell," as Mama called it.
          > > So, all this leads to why I wanted to give my
          > own
          > > family the magic of Christmas.
          > > At least for my son, who is my first born, I
          > know
          > > from his special phone call to me last night
          > that
          > > I
          > > succeeded.
          > > I am beginning to see signs in my daughter, a
          > new
          > > mother with her own little girl. After long
          > years,
          > > that's encouraging.
          > > Later, Carol
          > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
          >
          === message truncated ===




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        • Carol Singh
          Dear Faye, Okay! It s on! Thanks. Later, Carol ... === message truncated ===
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 13, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Faye,
            Okay! It's on! Thanks.
            Later, Carol
            --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

            > Carol,
            >
            > Just write like you do to us. It's that simple and
            > beautiful.
            >
            > :)
            >
            > Tootles,
            > Faye
            >
            >
            > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Dear Bob,
            > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's easier,
            > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to
            > > publish
            > > cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
            > > doesn't
            > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is, given
            > > the
            > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
            > > To date I've published academic articles and
            > had
            > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or
            > > commend
            > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I have
            > > never submitted anything anywhere else except for
            > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so few
            > > and
            > > far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
            > > rejection slips.
            > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a writer
            > > has
            > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
            > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
            > learned
            > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
            > > audience
            > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind and
            > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our
            > > common
            > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
            > beyond
            > > that of their roots.
            > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look Homeward,
            > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
            > > In recent months, several of our Tarheels have
            > > won
            > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their novels.
            > I
            > > do
            > > think that I can capture that, but differently or
            > in
            > > any case effectively enough that an editor
            > wouldn't
            > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a sure
            > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know. I've
            > > been
            > > working on that.
            > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had amazing
            > > runs.
            > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
            > > In writing about family, I simply write from
            > the
            > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I
            > don't
            > > actually go with a plan but with an experience.
            > > Consistently, I try to write so that my reader has
            > > an
            > > experience. I work from the inside out, not from
            > the
            > > outside in. I play with distance like a camera:
            > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase. I
            > have
            > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's the
            > > same
            > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so
            > that
            > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no place
            > > else but there.
            > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You Being
            > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning. The
            > > semester is over.
            > > I can celebrate and put together a manuscript.
            > I
            > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I will
            > > knock
            > > myself out.
            > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts already. I
            > > wasn't really satisfied with them.
            > > I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's see
            > > what I can do.
            > > Later, Carol
            > > --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have told
            > a
            > > > number of stories over the years in these posts
            > > that
            > > > I could see being woven into a book, with the
            > help
            > > > of a good editor and publisher. I would envision
            > a
            > > > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama and
            > > Uncle
            > > > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter,
            > catchier.
            > >
            > > > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
            > > > accomplished writers, and might be willing to
            > > review
            > > > a draft manuscript... give you some pointers.
            > But
            > > > finding a publisher -- that's a whole different
            > > > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if not a
            > > > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out every
            > > DAY,
            > > > looking for a publisher. I know some writers who
            > > > have worked on the craft all their lives and
            > still
            > > > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the
            > > expense
            > > > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing is
            > > > becoming an easier task for those who are
            > willing
            > > to
            > > > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally
            > > amounts
            > > > to several thousand dollars to do it right. One
            > > > thing I've found out by following the careers of
            > a
            > > > few writer friends and relatives -- the world of
            > > > professional writing is very competitive and not
            > > > very kind!
            > > > Bob Forbes
            > > > bforbes@...
            > > >
            > > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > > From: Carol Singh
            > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
            > > > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 7:34 PM
            > > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] A man's Christmas
            > > > passages....
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Dear Faye,
            > > > It's so generous of you to share your
            > thoughts.
            > > > Thank you very much.
            > > > Mama and Uncle Mark were incredibly strong and
            > > > wise. I always felt I was lacking that special
            > > > something that they had--compassion,
            > > selflessness,
            > > > and
            > > > wisdom. With the wisdom came self-examination
            > > and
            > > > self-knowledge, the ability to ask questions
            > and
            > > > to
            > > > lose without demeaning oneself--equating
            > losing
            > > > with
            > > > being a loser. Even yet, I continue to work on
            > > > those
            > > > last ones. What was so natural for Mama and
            > > Uncle
            > > > Mark
            > > > were so unnatural for me.
            > > > I think the difference was that I wanted more
            > > than
            > > > anything for them to be proud of me, and I
            > > equated
            > > > that with never having to say "I don't know."
            > > > What I did not understand from the very
            > > beginning
            > > > was that they were proud of me. I did not have
            > > to
            > > > "make" them proud of me.
            > > > Because of my feelings, I walked a very
            > careful
            > > > path with my own children, perhaps too careful
            > a
            > > > path.
            > > > I was fearful that they would love me too much
            > > and
            > > > think me much stronger and wiser than I
            > actually
            > > > was.
            > > > If they did, then they might think less of
            > > > themselves
            > > > and of their abilities.
            > > > What happened was their thinking I didn't care
            > > > about them, that I lived in the world of
            > ideas.
            > > > The
            > > > truth was very different.
            > > > I enjoyed ideas. I loved people and loved them
            > > for
            > > > themselves, not for their ideas.
            > > > I do not know if where you are there is the
            > t.v.
            >
            === message truncated ===




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          • Faye Silliman
            I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in the movie. ... === message truncated ===
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 13, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in the
              movie.


              --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

              > Dear Faye,
              > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
              > Later, Carol
              > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
              >
              > > Carol,
              > >
              > > Just write like you do to us. It's that simple
              > and
              > > beautiful.
              > >
              > > :)
              > >
              > > Tootles,
              > > Faye
              > >
              > >
              > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > > Dear Bob,
              > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
              > easier,
              > > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to
              > > > publish
              > > > cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
              > > > doesn't
              > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is,
              > given
              > > > the
              > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
              > > > To date I've published academic articles and
              > > had
              > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or
              > > > commend
              > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I
              > have
              > > > never submitted anything anywhere else except
              > for
              > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so
              > few
              > > > and
              > > > far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
              > > > rejection slips.
              > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
              > writer
              > > > has
              > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
              > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
              > > learned
              > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
              > > > audience
              > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind
              > and
              > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our
              > > > common
              > > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
              > > beyond
              > > > that of their roots.
              > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
              > Homeward,
              > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
              > > > In recent months, several of our Tarheels
              > have
              > > > won
              > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
              > novels.
              > > I
              > > > do
              > > > think that I can capture that, but differently
              > or
              > > in
              > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
              > > wouldn't
              > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a sure
              > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know.
              > I've
              > > > been
              > > > working on that.
              > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had amazing
              > > > runs.
              > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
              > > > In writing about family, I simply write from
              > > the
              > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I
              > > don't
              > > > actually go with a plan but with an experience.
              > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my reader
              > has
              > > > an
              > > > experience. I work from the inside out, not from
              > > the
              > > > outside in. I play with distance like a camera:
              > > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase. I
              > > have
              > > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's the
              > > > same
              > > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so
              > > that
              > > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no
              > place
              > > > else but there.
              > > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You
              > Being
              > > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning.
              > The
              > > > semester is over.
              > > > I can celebrate and put together a
              > manuscript.
              > > I
              > > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I will
              > > > knock
              > > > myself out.
              > > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts already.
              > I
              > > > wasn't really satisfied with them.
              > > > I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's
              > see
              > > > what I can do.
              > > > Later, Carol
              > > > --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have
              > told
              > > a
              > > > > number of stories over the years in these
              > posts
              > > > that
              > > > > I could see being woven into a book, with the
              > > help
              > > > > of a good editor and publisher. I would
              > envision
              > > a
              > > > > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama and
              > > > Uncle
              > > > > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter,
              > > catchier.
              > > >
              > > > > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
              > > > > accomplished writers, and might be willing to
              > > > review
              > > > > a draft manuscript... give you some pointers.
              > > But
              > > > > finding a publisher -- that's a whole
              > different
              > > > > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if not
              > a
              > > > > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out
              > every
              > > > DAY,
              > > > > looking for a publisher. I know some writers
              > who
              > > > > have worked on the craft all their lives and
              > > still
              > > > > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the
              > > > expense
              > > > > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing
              > is
              > > > > becoming an easier task for those who are
              > > willing
              > > > to
              > > > > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally
              > > > amounts
              > > > > to several thousand dollars to do it right.
              > One
              > > > > thing I've found out by following the careers
              > of
              > > a
              > > > > few writer friends and relatives -- the world
              > of
              > > > > professional writing is very competitive and
              > not
              > > > > very kind!
              > > > > Bob Forbes
              > > > > bforbes@...
              > > > >
              > > > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > > > From: Carol Singh
              > > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
              > > > > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2006 7:34 PM
              > > > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] A man's Christmas
              > > > > passages....
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > Dear Faye,
              > > > > It's so generous of you to share your
              > > thoughts.
              > > > > Thank you very much.
              > > > > Mama and Uncle Mark were incredibly strong
              > and
              > > > > wise. I always felt I was lacking that
              > special
              > > > > something that they had--compassion,
              > > > selflessness,
              > > > > and
              > > > > wisdom. With the wisdom came
              > self-examination
              > > > and
              > > > > self-knowledge, the ability to ask questions
              > > and
              > > > > to
              >
              === message truncated ===




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            • Carol Singh
              Dear Faye, It will be an honor to have you portray Mama. Not having had any volunteers for the part and considering women who had played similar roles in the
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 14, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Dear Faye,
                It will be an honor to have you portray Mama. Not
                having had any volunteers for the part and considering
                women who had played similar roles in the past, I was
                considering Julia Roberts for Mama and Robin Williams
                for Uncle Mark.
                Along with their complexity, kindness, and wisdom,
                both had a certain sense of humor as well as charm.
                Julia Roberts comes across as an incredible lady.
                Robin Williams has versatility that just won't quit.
                Mama's fastidiousness, never even close to
                peculiarity or compulsiveness, and her vivaciousness
                also come across in Julia Roberts.
                In My Best Friend's Wedding, Julia exhibits some of
                the zaniness of the Auntie Mame of Patrick Dennis, and
                Mama was like that, too. However, in circumstances
                like those of Julia in Wedding, she would never have
                behaved like that. She was above that. She was more
                like Jackie Kennedy. She kept her dignity without the
                remote possibility of being mistaken for a shrew or a
                snob.
                Finally, Mama was the most down-to-earth without
                being "earthy" person anyone would ever want to meet.
                Uncle Mark was the same way. Both felt strongly that a
                person's worth was part and parcel of his self-respect
                and his conduct toward other people, not in what he
                had or who he was.
                In my own walk through life, I have tried to follow
                their path.
                As for autograph, it's yours, along with the role.
                Another of our group would make a wonderful Uncle
                Mark, now that you've got me thinking. I'll let you
                know if I get a volunteer!
                Later, Carol


                --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

                > I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in
                > the
                > movie.
                >
                >
                > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Dear Faye,
                > > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
                > > Later, Carol
                > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > > Carol,
                > > >
                > > > Just write like you do to us. It's that simple
                > > and
                > > > beautiful.
                > > >
                > > > :)
                > > >
                > > > Tootles,
                > > > Faye
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
                > > wrote:
                > > >
                > > > > Dear Bob,
                > > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
                > > easier,
                > > > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction, to
                > > > > publish
                > > > > cookbooks than just about anything else. But,
                > > > > doesn't
                > > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is,
                > > given
                > > > > the
                > > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
                > > > > To date I've published academic articles
                > and
                > > > had
                > > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it, or
                > > > > commend
                > > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I
                > > have
                > > > > never submitted anything anywhere else except
                > > for
                > > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been so
                > > few
                > > > > and
                > > > > far between that I have garnered fewer than 10
                > > > > rejection slips.
                > > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
                > > writer
                > > > > has
                > > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
                > > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
                > > > learned
                > > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
                > > > > audience
                > > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to mind
                > > and
                > > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to our
                > > > > common
                > > > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
                > > > beyond
                > > > > that of their roots.
                > > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
                > > Homeward,
                > > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
                > > > > In recent months, several of our Tarheels
                > > have
                > > > > won
                > > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
                > > novels.
                > > > I
                > > > > do
                > > > > think that I can capture that, but differently
                > > or
                > > > in
                > > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
                > > > wouldn't
                > > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a
                > sure
                > > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know.
                > > I've
                > > > > been
                > > > > working on that.
                > > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had
                > amazing
                > > > > runs.
                > > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
                > > > > In writing about family, I simply write
                > from
                > > > the
                > > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II, I
                > > > don't
                > > > > actually go with a plan but with an
                > experience.
                > > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my reader
                > > has
                > > > > an
                > > > > experience. I work from the inside out, not
                > from
                > > > the
                > > > > outside in. I play with distance like a
                > camera:
                > > > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the chase.
                > I
                > > > have
                > > > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's
                > the
                > > > > same
                > > > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out so
                > > > that
                > > > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no
                > > place
                > > > > else but there.
                > > > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You
                > > Being
                > > > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this morning.
                > > The
                > > > > semester is over.
                > > > > I can celebrate and put together a
                > > manuscript.
                > > > I
                > > > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I
                > will
                > > > > knock
                > > > > myself out.
                > > > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts
                > already.
                > > I
                > > > > wasn't really satisfied with them.
                > > > > I'd welcome any suggestion from you. Let's
                > > see
                > > > > what I can do.
                > > > > Later, Carol
                > > > > --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...>
                > wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > > Carol - Faye is right, of course. You have
                > > told
                > > > a
                > > > > > number of stories over the years in these
                > > posts
                > > > > that
                > > > > > I could see being woven into a book, with
                > the
                > > > help
                > > > > > of a good editor and publisher. I would
                > > envision
                > > > a
                > > > > > title something like, "The Wisdom of Mama
                > and
                > > > > Uncle
                > > > > > Mark" or perhaps something even shorter,
                > > > catchier.
                > > > >
                > > > > > I have a couple of relatives who are fairly
                > > > > > accomplished writers, and might be willing
                > to
                > > > > review
                > > > > > a draft manuscript... give you some
                > pointers.
                > > > But
                > > > > > finding a publisher -- that's a whole
                > > different
                > > > > > matter. I'm told that several hundred (if
                > not
                > > a
                > > > > > thousand or two) new manuscripts come out
                > > every
                > > > > DAY,
                > > > > > looking for a publisher. I know some writers
                > > who
                > > > > > have worked on the craft all their lives and
                > > > still
                > > > > > cannot find a publisher willing to risk the
                > > > > expense
                > > > > > of mass production. Luckily, self-publishing
                > > is
                > > > > > becoming an easier task for those who are
                > > > willing
                > > > > to
                > > > > > risk some of their own $$ -- what generally
                > > > > amounts
                > > > > > to several thousand dollars to do it right.
                > > One
                > > > > > thing I've found out by following the
                > careers
                > > of
                > > > a
                > > > > > few writer friends and relatives -- the
                > world
                > > of
                > > > > > professional writing is very competitive and
                > > not
                > > > > > very kind!
                > > > > > Bob Forbes
                > > > > > bforbes@...
                >
                === message truncated ===




                ____________________________________________________________________________________
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              • Faye Silliman
                Hmmm....I look more like Robin Williams. ... === message truncated === ____________________________________________________________________________________ Do
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 14, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hmmm....I look more like Robin Williams.


                  --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

                  > Dear Faye,
                  > It will be an honor to have you portray Mama. Not
                  > having had any volunteers for the part and
                  > considering
                  > women who had played similar roles in the past, I
                  > was
                  > considering Julia Roberts for Mama and Robin
                  > Williams
                  > for Uncle Mark.
                  > Along with their complexity, kindness, and
                  > wisdom,
                  > both had a certain sense of humor as well as charm.
                  > Julia Roberts comes across as an incredible lady.
                  > Robin Williams has versatility that just won't quit.
                  > Mama's fastidiousness, never even close to
                  > peculiarity or compulsiveness, and her vivaciousness
                  > also come across in Julia Roberts.
                  > In My Best Friend's Wedding, Julia exhibits some
                  > of
                  > the zaniness of the Auntie Mame of Patrick Dennis,
                  > and
                  > Mama was like that, too. However, in circumstances
                  > like those of Julia in Wedding, she would never have
                  > behaved like that. She was above that. She was more
                  > like Jackie Kennedy. She kept her dignity without
                  > the
                  > remote possibility of being mistaken for a shrew or
                  > a
                  > snob.
                  > Finally, Mama was the most down-to-earth without
                  > being "earthy" person anyone would ever want to
                  > meet.
                  > Uncle Mark was the same way. Both felt strongly that
                  > a
                  > person's worth was part and parcel of his
                  > self-respect
                  > and his conduct toward other people, not in what he
                  > had or who he was.
                  > In my own walk through life, I have tried to
                  > follow
                  > their path.
                  > As for autograph, it's yours, along with the
                  > role.
                  > Another of our group would make a wonderful Uncle
                  > Mark, now that you've got me thinking. I'll let you
                  > know if I get a volunteer!
                  > Later, Carol
                  >
                  >
                  > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > I want an autographed copy and role as your mom in
                  > > the
                  > > movie.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Dear Faye,
                  > > > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
                  > > > Later, Carol
                  > > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > > Carol,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Just write like you do to us. It's that
                  > simple
                  > > > and
                  > > > > beautiful.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > :)
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Tootles,
                  > > > > Faye
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
                  > > > wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > > Dear Bob,
                  > > > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
                  > > > easier,
                  > > > > > though, to publish nonfiction than fiction,
                  > to
                  > > > > > publish
                  > > > > > cookbooks than just about anything else.
                  > But,
                  > > > > > doesn't
                  > > > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That is,
                  > > > given
                  > > > > > the
                  > > > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
                  > > > > > To date I've published academic articles
                  > > and
                  > > > > had
                  > > > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it,
                  > or
                  > > > > > commend
                  > > > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However, I
                  > > > have
                  > > > > > never submitted anything anywhere else
                  > except
                  > > > for
                  > > > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have been
                  > so
                  > > > few
                  > > > > > and
                  > > > > > far between that I have garnered fewer than
                  > 10
                  > > > > > rejection slips.
                  > > > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
                  > > > writer
                  > > > > > has
                  > > > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
                  > > > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger, lessons
                  > > > > learned
                  > > > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a special
                  > > > > > audience
                  > > > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to
                  > mind
                  > > > and
                  > > > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to
                  > our
                  > > > > > common
                  > > > > > humanity. The result is an audience far, far
                  > > > > beyond
                  > > > > > that of their roots.
                  > > > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
                  > > > Homeward,
                  > > > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
                  > > > > > In recent months, several of our
                  > Tarheels
                  > > > have
                  > > > > > won
                  > > > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
                  > > > novels.
                  > > > > I
                  > > > > > do
                  > > > > > think that I can capture that, but
                  > differently
                  > > > or
                  > > > > in
                  > > > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
                  > > > > wouldn't
                  > > > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a
                  > > sure
                  > > > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't know.
                  > > > I've
                  > > > > > been
                  > > > > > working on that.
                  > > > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had
                  > > amazing
                  > > > > > runs.
                  > > > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
                  > > > > > In writing about family, I simply write
                  > > from
                  > > > > the
                  > > > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles II,
                  > I
                  > > > > don't
                  > > > > > actually go with a plan but with an
                  > > experience.
                  > > > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my
                  > reader
                  > > > has
                  > > > > > an
                  > > > > > experience. I work from the inside out, not
                  > > from
                  > > > > the
                  > > > > > outside in. I play with distance like a
                  > > camera:
                  > > > > > close-ups and zoom shots. I cut to the
                  > chase.
                  > > I
                  > > > > have
                  > > > > > fun. I want the reader to have fun too. It's
                  > > the
                  > > > > > same
                  > > > > > with colleagues at work. I knock myself out
                  > so
                  > > > > that
                  > > > > > they will want to be there, maybe even be no
                  > > > place
                  > > > > > else but there.
                  > > > > > Right now, as the clerks say on "Are You
                  > > > Being
                  > > > > > Served?", I am free. My exam was this
                  > morning.
                  > > > The
                  > > > > > semester is over.
                  > > > > > I can celebrate and put together a
                  > > > manuscript.
                  > > > > I
                  > > > > > promise you, though, that whatever it is, I
                  > > will
                  > > > > > knock
                  > > > > > myself out.
                  > > > > > I've tossed out a couple of drafts
                  > > already.
                  > > > I
                  >
                  === message truncated ===




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                • Carol Singh
                  Dear Faye, Hey, that s great! What makes him so versatile is his incredibly expressive face. What he can t do with body language does not need to be done! I
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 18, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dear Faye,
                    Hey, that's great! What makes him so versatile is
                    his incredibly expressive face. What he can't do with
                    body language does not need to be done!
                    I especially admired him in Mrs. Doubtfire! What a
                    talent! He is one of the most gifted actors we have.
                    Shakespeare would have loved him.
                    Remember, too, that Shakespeare's women were
                    played by men.
                    It wasn't until the 18th century that we had women
                    the likes of Mrs. Siddons.
                    Later, Carol
                    --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

                    > Hmmm....I look more like Robin Williams.
                    >
                    >
                    > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > Dear Faye,
                    > > It will be an honor to have you portray Mama.
                    > Not
                    > > having had any volunteers for the part and
                    > > considering
                    > > women who had played similar roles in the past, I
                    > > was
                    > > considering Julia Roberts for Mama and Robin
                    > > Williams
                    > > for Uncle Mark.
                    > > Along with their complexity, kindness, and
                    > > wisdom,
                    > > both had a certain sense of humor as well as
                    > charm.
                    > > Julia Roberts comes across as an incredible
                    > lady.
                    > > Robin Williams has versatility that just won't
                    > quit.
                    > > Mama's fastidiousness, never even close to
                    > > peculiarity or compulsiveness, and her
                    > vivaciousness
                    > > also come across in Julia Roberts.
                    > > In My Best Friend's Wedding, Julia exhibits
                    > some
                    > > of
                    > > the zaniness of the Auntie Mame of Patrick Dennis,
                    > > and
                    > > Mama was like that, too. However, in circumstances
                    > > like those of Julia in Wedding, she would never
                    > have
                    > > behaved like that. She was above that. She was
                    > more
                    > > like Jackie Kennedy. She kept her dignity without
                    > > the
                    > > remote possibility of being mistaken for a shrew
                    > or
                    > > a
                    > > snob.
                    > > Finally, Mama was the most down-to-earth
                    > without
                    > > being "earthy" person anyone would ever want to
                    > > meet.
                    > > Uncle Mark was the same way. Both felt strongly
                    > that
                    > > a
                    > > person's worth was part and parcel of his
                    > > self-respect
                    > > and his conduct toward other people, not in what
                    > he
                    > > had or who he was.
                    > > In my own walk through life, I have tried to
                    > > follow
                    > > their path.
                    > > As for autograph, it's yours, along with the
                    > > role.
                    > > Another of our group would make a wonderful
                    > Uncle
                    > > Mark, now that you've got me thinking. I'll let
                    > you
                    > > know if I get a volunteer!
                    > > Later, Carol
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > I want an autographed copy and role as your mom
                    > in
                    > > > the
                    > > > movie.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > > Dear Faye,
                    > > > > Okay! It's on! Thanks.
                    > > > > Later, Carol
                    > > > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > > Carol,
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Just write like you do to us. It's that
                    > > simple
                    > > > > and
                    > > > > > beautiful.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > :)
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Tootles,
                    > > > > > Faye
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > --- Carol Singh
                    > <csinghworthington@...>
                    > > > > wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Dear Bob,
                    > > > > > > Thanks! As to publishers, I know! It's
                    > > > > easier,
                    > > > > > > though, to publish nonfiction than
                    > fiction,
                    > > to
                    > > > > > > publish
                    > > > > > > cookbooks than just about anything else.
                    > > But,
                    > > > > > > doesn't
                    > > > > > > the cookbook craze stand to reason? That
                    > is,
                    > > > > given
                    > > > > > > the
                    > > > > > > media hype on the "obesity epidemic."
                    > > > > > > To date I've published academic
                    > articles
                    > > > and
                    > > > > > had
                    > > > > > > newspapers publish my stuff, as I call it,
                    > > or
                    > > > > > > commend
                    > > > > > > me for my stuff. That's about it. However,
                    > I
                    > > > > have
                    > > > > > > never submitted anything anywhere else
                    > > except
                    > > > > for
                    > > > > > > poetry. Even then, my submissions have
                    > been
                    > > so
                    > > > > few
                    > > > > > > and
                    > > > > > > far between that I have garnered fewer
                    > than
                    > > 10
                    > > > > > > rejection slips.
                    > > > > > > When it comes to writing on oneself, a
                    > > > > writer
                    > > > > > > has
                    > > > > > > to hit a common chord in a very broad
                    > > > > > > audience--motherhood, Horatio Alger,
                    > lessons
                    > > > > > learned
                    > > > > > > or to aim at the other extreme for a
                    > special
                    > > > > > > audience
                    > > > > > > like a popular minority. Amy Tan comes to
                    > > mind
                    > > > > and
                    > > > > > > Maya Angelou. Both reach out and appeal to
                    > > our
                    > > > > > > common
                    > > > > > > humanity. The result is an audience far,
                    > far
                    > > > > > beyond
                    > > > > > > that of their roots.
                    > > > > > > A Tarheel example is the novel Look
                    > > > > Homeward,
                    > > > > > > Angel. It, too, has universal apeal.
                    > > > > > > In recent months, several of our
                    > > Tarheels
                    > > > > have
                    > > > > > > won
                    > > > > > > acclaim for the "sense of place" in their
                    > > > > novels.
                    > > > > > I
                    > > > > > > do
                    > > > > > > think that I can capture that, but
                    > > differently
                    > > > > or
                    > > > > > in
                    > > > > > > any case effectively enough that an editor
                    > > > > > wouldn't
                    > > > > > > ask what makes this one stand out? Is it a
                    > > > sure
                    > > > > > > winner, or a shot in the dark? I don't
                    > know.
                    > > > > I've
                    > > > > > > been
                    > > > > > > working on that.
                    > > > > > > Essayists like Joan Didion have had
                    > > > amazing
                    > > > > > > runs.
                    > > > > > > I've been astounded at it, still am.
                    > > > > > > In writing about family, I simply
                    > write
                    > > > from
                    > > > > > the
                    > > > > > > heart. With the exception of Chronicles
                    > II,
                    > > I
                    > > > > > don't
                    > > > > > > actually go with a plan but with an
                    > > > experience.
                    > > > > > > Consistently, I try to write so that my
                    > > reader
                    > > > > has
                    > > > > > > an
                    > > > > > > experience. I work from the inside out,
                    > not
                    >
                    === message truncated ===


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