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Catherine's paper on Tuscarora Indians - New file uploaded to genpcncfir

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  • Bob Forbes
    I wanted to bring to this group s attention, for those who have not seen it already, an excellent paper that Catherine wrote on the history of the Tuscarora
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 8, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      I wanted to bring to this group's attention, for those who have not seen it already, an excellent paper that Catherine wrote on the history of the Tuscarora Indians in N. Carolina. She uploaded it onto the group's Yahoo website and you can access this file at the URL:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/amh2010%20Tuscarora%20Indians-a%20history.doc

      The paper is pretty enlightening and really worth a read, but you need to give yourself about a half hour to absorb and appreciate it. Her paper showed up around Thanksgiving and I've been meaning to send this note ever since, but got caught up in the typical demands of this season... (BTW, anybody heard about the 4 stages of a man's life related to Santa?... let me know if not...)

      Also at about the same time that Catherine's article showed up, I saw another good article about a Pitt County man who recently discovered his American Indian heritage, and have pasted it below my sign-off... I like it because it reminds me once again of why we take the time and trouble to "dig up our roots".....

      Bob Forbes
      bforbes@...


      Local American Indian discovers roots

      By Corey G. Johnson
      The Daily Reflector

      Thursday, November 23, 2006

      In 1991, Connie Glast - inspired by the television movie "Roots" - decided to find out if he had American Indian heritage. As a child, he had heard whispers of a possible link, but his great-grandmother refused to discuss it.

      Years later, when the 64-year-old Greenville resident and father of two embarked on his own journey to get answers, he received a different kind of resistance.


      Rhett Butler/The Daily Reflector
      (ENLARGE)
      CONNIE GLAST holds the award he received at his home on Wednesday. The gesture affirmed Glast's belief in civic service.

      "One woman who was over this cultural center simply walked away when I asked her for help," Glast said. "All she could say was 'everybody who walks in the door is not an Indian.'"

      Glast was undeterred.

      He visited the state archives in Raleigh. He poured over dusty courthouse records. He interviewed more than 50 people, old and young, skeptical and helpful.

      Seven years later, after learning that an American Indian great-great- grandfather fought in the Revolutionary War out of New Bern, the state accepted his brother Eddie and him as members of the Coharie Tribe.

      His determination was finally rewarded.

      "If you got a goal, you don't let anything deter you," said Glast, who retired in 2004 after 30 years at NAACO Materials Handling Group as a quality assurance inspector. "Everyone should know where they come from so they can know where they're going."

      According to the Coharie Intra-Tribal Council, Inc., the Coharie Indian Tribe is centered in Harnett and Sampson counties. Tribal members descend from the aboriginal tribe of the Neusiok Indians.

      As part of Native American Month in November, Glast - who also goes by the name Gray Wolf - and other American Indian friends this week played drums and danced for students and teachers at D.H. Conley High School.

      The ceremony was an important act of remembering, Glast said.

      "I do everything I can to keep reminding young people about Native American culture," Glast said. "We can't forget, because if we do they will disappear."

      Glast added that despite atrocities against Native Americans throughout history, Thanksgiving is a positive time.

      "Yes, it is a sad time and we've had some bad times in history," Glast said. "But that's history, and we're trying to get above that. For me, it is more a time of thanking the Creator for what he has done and what he brought us through."

      Others are beginning to recognize Glast's faithfulness to heritage.

      When Glast traveled to a Coharie tribal meeting in Clinton this month to donate more than 60 custom-made yellow, blue, red and gray T-shirts, he was surprised with an award for his dedication to the group.

      "I was really knocked off my feet," Glast said.

      "No one has ever given me a plaque for anything."

      The gesture affirmed Glast's belief in civic service.

      "I tell people, 'May the work you've done speak for you.'"


      Corey G. Johnson can be reached at cjohnson@... or 329-9565.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2006 9:42 PM
      Subject: [genpcncfir] New file uploaded to genpcncfir



      Hello,

      This email message is a notification to let you know that
      a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the genpcncfir
      group.

      File : /amh2010 Tuscarora Indians-a history.doc
      Uploaded by : seadreamen <seadreamen@...>
      Description : Tuscarora Indians - Research Paper

      You can access this file at the URL:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/amh2010%20Tuscarora%20Indians-a%20history.doc

      To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
      http://help.yahoo.com/help/us/groups/files

      Regards,

      seadreamen <seadreamen@...>






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Sauls
      I have not heard about the 4 stages of a man s life related to Santa. Please tell suzanne ... From: Bob Forbes To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday,
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 8, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I have not heard about the 4 stages of a man's life related to Santa. Please tell
        suzanne

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Bob Forbes
        To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, December 08, 2006 7:25 AM
        Subject: [genpcncfir] Catherine's paper on Tuscarora Indians - New file uploaded to genpcncfir


        I wanted to bring to this group's attention, for those who have not seen it already, an excellent paper that Catherine wrote on the history of the Tuscarora Indians in N. Carolina. She uploaded it onto the group's Yahoo website and you can access this file at the URL:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/amh2010%20Tuscarora%20Indians-a%20history.doc

        The paper is pretty enlightening and really worth a read, but you need to give yourself about a half hour to absorb and appreciate it. Her paper showed up around Thanksgiving and I've been meaning to send this note ever since, but got caught up in the typical demands of this season... (BTW, anybody heard about the 4 stages of a man's life related to Santa?... let me know if not...)

        Also at about the same time that Catherine's article showed up, I saw another good article about a Pitt County man who recently discovered his American Indian heritage, and have pasted it below my sign-off... I like it because it reminds me once again of why we take the time and trouble to "dig up our roots".....

        Bob Forbes
        bforbes@...

        Local American Indian discovers roots

        By Corey G. Johnson
        The Daily Reflector

        Thursday, November 23, 2006

        In 1991, Connie Glast - inspired by the television movie "Roots" - decided to find out if he had American Indian heritage. As a child, he had heard whispers of a possible link, but his great-grandmother refused to discuss it.

        Years later, when the 64-year-old Greenville resident and father of two embarked on his own journey to get answers, he received a different kind of resistance.

        Rhett Butler/The Daily Reflector
        (ENLARGE)
        CONNIE GLAST holds the award he received at his home on Wednesday. The gesture affirmed Glast's belief in civic service.

        "One woman who was over this cultural center simply walked away when I asked her for help," Glast said. "All she could say was 'everybody who walks in the door is not an Indian.'"

        Glast was undeterred.

        He visited the state archives in Raleigh. He poured over dusty courthouse records. He interviewed more than 50 people, old and young, skeptical and helpful.

        Seven years later, after learning that an American Indian great-great- grandfather fought in the Revolutionary War out of New Bern, the state accepted his brother Eddie and him as members of the Coharie Tribe.

        His determination was finally rewarded.

        "If you got a goal, you don't let anything deter you," said Glast, who retired in 2004 after 30 years at NAACO Materials Handling Group as a quality assurance inspector. "Everyone should know where they come from so they can know where they're going."

        According to the Coharie Intra-Tribal Council, Inc., the Coharie Indian Tribe is centered in Harnett and Sampson counties. Tribal members descend from the aboriginal tribe of the Neusiok Indians.

        As part of Native American Month in November, Glast - who also goes by the name Gray Wolf - and other American Indian friends this week played drums and danced for students and teachers at D.H. Conley High School.

        The ceremony was an important act of remembering, Glast said.

        "I do everything I can to keep reminding young people about Native American culture," Glast said. "We can't forget, because if we do they will disappear."

        Glast added that despite atrocities against Native Americans throughout history, Thanksgiving is a positive time.

        "Yes, it is a sad time and we've had some bad times in history," Glast said. "But that's history, and we're trying to get above that. For me, it is more a time of thanking the Creator for what he has done and what he brought us through."

        Others are beginning to recognize Glast's faithfulness to heritage.

        When Glast traveled to a Coharie tribal meeting in Clinton this month to donate more than 60 custom-made yellow, blue, red and gray T-shirts, he was surprised with an award for his dedication to the group.

        "I was really knocked off my feet," Glast said.

        "No one has ever given me a plaque for anything."

        The gesture affirmed Glast's belief in civic service.

        "I tell people, 'May the work you've done speak for you.'"

        Corey G. Johnson can be reached at cjohnson@... or 329-9565.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2006 9:42 PM
        Subject: [genpcncfir] New file uploaded to genpcncfir

        Hello,

        This email message is a notification to let you know that
        a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the genpcncfir
        group.

        File : /amh2010 Tuscarora Indians-a history.doc
        Uploaded by : seadreamen <seadreamen@...>
        Description : Tuscarora Indians - Research Paper

        You can access this file at the URL:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/amh2010%20Tuscarora%20Indians-a%20history.doc

        To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
        http://help.yahoo.com/help/us/groups/files

        Regards,

        seadreamen <seadreamen@...>

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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