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DNA testing

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  • Paula Baker
    I joined the BakerDNA.net project and my father submitted his DNA for Y testing. We matched a man whose ancestor was William Baker b. abt 1800 from Greene Co
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 2, 2006
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      I joined the BakerDNA.net project and my father submitted his DNA for Y
      testing. We matched a man whose ancestor was William Baker b. abt 1800 from
      Greene Co NC. My James Baker b. 1804 from Greene Co NC is my earliest
      ancestor. Only men can participate in this Y testing since women do not
      have Y chromosomes. One thing that was useful is that now we know that the
      Baker men did father the children down to Cliff Baker and down to my father
      Louis. We know that because we matched. Right now we are a two person
      group on the BakerDNA.net site. Look for "Bakers with ties to Greene Co."
      Click either number and you can see our lines. Go to www.familytreedna.com
      and see if there is a surname project going on for your surname. What we
      are hoping for now is a match, perhaps from Maryland or Virginia or a
      different county in NC. The group my father tested in is R1b. The Moses
      Baker, Elizabeth Brown line from Edgecombe, tested in the J group. R1b and
      J are two of several haplogroups in the Y testing testing that indicate what
      region of the world your DNA could have come from.

      We also had my father's MtDNA tested, which is really useless for genealogy.
      That traces his mother's mother's mother's dna......way back to early
      times. That just tells approx. what region of the world that person or
      group came from. I'm not sure I would do that again. And, that doesn't
      test MY dna since I got my mtdna from my mother. This can sometimes, but
      not always, tell you race very far back. A lot of us came from Europe of
      course. The mapping process for this project is very complicated and the
      results we got were European, but the lower part of Europe perhaps. Then a
      woman wrote to me telling me that a few people in my "group" were claiming
      Native American ancestry. I'm not interested in that much complexity.
      Perhaps this info will be helpful later.



      Paula Anne Baker
      paulabaker69@...
      Researching BAKER, MANNING, TYSON, STOCKS AND OTHERS in Pitt County NC and
      Greene County NC
      and COLE, NORMAN, WHITE, SUTTON AND OTHERS in SC, GA, and LA

      "We are not free, separate, and independent entities, but like links in a
      chain, and we could not by any means be what we are without those who went
      before us and showed us the way."

      Thomas Mann
    • Carol Singh
      Dear Paula, Thanks for explaining it to me. I had understood that the male line would be tested but not how from it the maternal line would also be involved.
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 5, 2006
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        Dear Paula,
        Thanks for explaining it to me. I had understood
        that the male line would be tested but not how from it
        the maternal line would also be involved.
        Since our McGowan, Braxton, and Worthington
        families, not to mention Cannon, Dail and numerous
        others, are so intermarried, we would definitely have
        to go back beyond our arrival in this country to learn
        anything more.
        As you know my first questions were about my
        McGowan line, who was my great grandfather and how
        could I prove it?
        William William McGowan was my great uncle. His
        brother Lemuel, Sr. was my great grandfather. His
        brother Archibald was my great uncle. His other
        brother was also my great uncle.
        Lemuel McGowan, Jr. married his Uncle William
        William McGowan's daughter Lydia. They had no children
        as far as I have been able to learn.
        Then Lemuel Jr.'s sister Jacky Ann McGowan has a
        child in 1879, and that child, Jenny S[ecession]
        McGowan is identified as "grandchild" in the household
        of Lemuel McGowan, Sr. and Perlina Moore McGowan where
        Jacky still resides. She is listed as "single" in the
        1880 census along with her sisters still living there.
        If Mama had not told me, later census records
        would have told me that Jenny was the daughter of
        Jacky Ann--notably the 1900 Nash County Census I
        stumbled upon by accident and the 1910 Pitt County
        Census where both were living in the household of
        Alfred Worthington, the previously widowed Jenny's new
        husband.
        If I had stumbled upon the 1900 Nash County
        Census prior to learning that Jenny's husband's last
        name was ANDERSON, seeing Jenny Anderson in that
        census would have rung no bell. Sometimes
        circumstances simply fall into place at the right
        time.
        The McGowan line is further complicated by
        Jenny's marriage to Alfred Worthington who was the son
        of Alfred Worthington, Sr. and Sarah Frances McGowan.
        Sarah Frances and Jacky Ann were first cousins.
        What confirmed Jenny's parentage for me was the
        listing of Ken McGowan on one of Jenny's marriage
        licenses. I knew that this was William Kinsey McGowan
        when W.K. was further identified with "also known as
        Ken" when named as one of the heirs of George Moore,
        his maternal grandfather, along with his brother
        Mumford McGowan.
        Take the much-argued case of Thomas Jefferson's
        descendants which first sparked my interest.
        Did he or did he not father children by Sally
        Hemmings, his wife's half sister and part Negro?
        What the DNA came down to was that the Hemmings
        had Jefferson DNA and were finally allowed to
        participate in the Jefferson family reunion.
        Since for whatever reason nobody could prove that
        it was Thomas Jefferson himself, instead of an uncle
        or nephew or whoever, who had fathered the Hemmings
        line, there remain vocal defendants of Thomas
        Jefferson himself as a man who would never have
        fathered an out-of-wedlock child or who would never
        have fathered a child with his deceased wife's half
        sister or, again, whatever or whoever.
        What puzzles me, then, is how does a DNA service
        like the one Maury Povich supposedly uses identify
        positively who is the father of every disputed case
        brought to his show? A few times the reputed fathers
        were brothers and in one case twins.
        Is it possible to identify which of a set of
        twins or a set of identical twins is the father of a
        particular child?
        Do you know? Later, Carol




        --- Paula Baker <paulabaker69@...> wrote:

        > I joined the BakerDNA.net project and my father
        > submitted his DNA for Y
        > testing. We matched a man whose ancestor was
        > William Baker b. abt 1800 from
        > Greene Co NC. My James Baker b. 1804 from Greene
        > Co NC is my earliest
        > ancestor. Only men can participate in this Y
        > testing since women do not
        > have Y chromosomes. One thing that was useful is
        > that now we know that the
        > Baker men did father the children down to Cliff
        > Baker and down to my father
        > Louis. We know that because we matched. Right now
        > we are a two person
        > group on the BakerDNA.net site. Look for "Bakers
        > with ties to Greene Co."
        > Click either number and you can see our lines. Go
        > to www.familytreedna.com
        > and see if there is a surname project going on for
        > your surname. What we
        > are hoping for now is a match, perhaps from Maryland
        > or Virginia or a
        > different county in NC. The group my father tested
        > in is R1b. The Moses
        > Baker, Elizabeth Brown line from Edgecombe, tested
        > in the J group. R1b and
        > J are two of several haplogroups in the Y testing
        > testing that indicate what
        > region of the world your DNA could have come from.
        >
        > We also had my father's MtDNA tested, which is
        > really useless for genealogy.
        > That traces his mother's mother's mother's
        > dna......way back to early
        > times. That just tells approx. what region of the
        > world that person or
        > group came from. I'm not sure I would do that
        > again. And, that doesn't
        > test MY dna since I got my mtdna from my mother.
        > This can sometimes, but
        > not always, tell you race very far back. A lot of
        > us came from Europe of
        > course. The mapping process for this project is
        > very complicated and the
        > results we got were European, but the lower part of
        > Europe perhaps. Then a
        > woman wrote to me telling me that a few people in my
        > "group" were claiming
        > Native American ancestry. I'm not interested in
        > that much complexity.
        > Perhaps this info will be helpful later.
        >
        >
        >
        > Paula Anne Baker
        > paulabaker69@...
        > Researching BAKER, MANNING, TYSON, STOCKS AND OTHERS
        > in Pitt County NC and
        > Greene County NC
        > and COLE, NORMAN, WHITE, SUTTON AND OTHERS in SC,
        > GA, and LA
        >
        > "We are not free, separate, and independent
        > entities, but like links in a
        > chain, and we could not by any means be what we are
        > without those who went
        > before us and showed us the way."
        >
        > Thomas Mann
        >
        >
        >


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      • Paula Baker
        I don t think you can distinguish identical twins on Dna, but I m not positive about it. Paula Anne Baker paulabaker69@hotmail.com Researching BAKER, MANNING,
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 5, 2006
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          I don't think you can distinguish identical twins on Dna, but I'm not
          positive about it.



          Paula Anne Baker
          paulabaker69@...
          Researching BAKER, MANNING, TYSON, STOCKS AND OTHERS in Pitt County NC and
          Greene County NC
          and COLE, NORMAN, WHITE, SUTTON AND OTHERS in SC, GA, and LA

          "We are not free, separate, and independent entities, but like links in a
          chain, and we could not by any means be what we are without those who went
          before us and showed us the way."

          Thomas Mann
        • Carol Singh
          Dear Paula, I agree. Thanks, Carol ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 5, 2006
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            Dear Paula,
            I agree. Thanks, Carol

            --- Paula Baker <paulabaker69@...> wrote:

            > I don't think you can distinguish identical twins on
            > Dna, but I'm not
            > positive about it.
            >
            >
            >
            > Paula Anne Baker
            > paulabaker69@...
            > Researching BAKER, MANNING, TYSON, STOCKS AND OTHERS
            > in Pitt County NC and
            > Greene County NC
            > and COLE, NORMAN, WHITE, SUTTON AND OTHERS in SC,
            > GA, and LA
            >
            > "We are not free, separate, and independent
            > entities, but like links in a
            > chain, and we could not by any means be what we are
            > without those who went
            > before us and showed us the way."
            >
            > Thomas Mann
            >
            >
            >


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            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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