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Re: [genpcncfir] while we speak of trees!

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  • amaryllish@aol.com
    Thank you for the tree sites. It s great to have people that share this info. Amy [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 34 , Apr 1, 2006
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      Thank you for the tree sites. It's great to have people that share this
      info. Amy


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carol Singh
      Dear David, Thanks! Those black walnuts are a prize! Ours on our farm in Hanover County, Virginia went up like Challenger during a hurricane in the 1950 s. We
      Message 34 of 34 , Apr 24, 2006
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        Dear David,
        Thanks! Those black walnuts are a prize! Ours on
        our farm in Hanover County, Virginia went up like
        Challenger during a hurricane in the 1950's. We
        children gathered the walnuts every year for Mama and
        her friends to use in their baking. All you need is a
        strong nutcracker or a hammer to break those shells.
        Do let me know how your trees are coming along. You
        will also enjoy your elms. Later, Carol

        --- L D Smith <ldsesq@...> wrote:

        > thanks for the input carol
        >
        > my brother is a botanist and was able to come to the
        > home this weekend. he helped us "realize" one of
        > the two trees we thought were pecans is actually an
        > american elm, probably over a hundred years old,
        > and, because of dutch elm disease, a very rare
        > surprise! we also have many willow and laurel oaks
        > and probably 8 very small black walnuts we plan on
        > allowing to grow if we can (they may help with the
        > retirement fund!) we have a fig, some red oaks,
        > many southern sugar maples and american cherry
        > trees. i'm very excited by his news! i'll keep all
        > this in mind. if any of you happen to be out our
        > way feel free to stop and catch our progress. it'll
        > take a few years but good to do while we are still
        > young (i just turned 28). ya'll take care!
        >
        > david
        >
        > -----------------------------------------------
        > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > > From: csinghworthington@...
        > > Date: Thu, 20 Apr 2006 17:00:28 -0700
        > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] while we speak of trees!
        > >
        > > Dear David,
        > > As you may have guessed, I am just catching up
        > with
        > > my e-mails. I wrote my reply before reading
        > Brother
        > > Bob Forbes's response. As usual, he has some
        > really
        > > good suggestions and a wealth of knowledge. I
        > agree
        > > completely with his recommendations of holly and
        > > dogwood and the flowering shrubs. They are
        > absolutely
        > > delightful and provide a variety of color.
        > > Also, do forgive my typos. Sometimes my
        > thoughts
        > > dance ahead of my fingers! Later, Carol
        > > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...>
        > wrote:
        > > > Dear David,
        > > > We children loved the Japanese Maple that
        > Mama
        > > > had
        > > > planted in our front yard. Additionally, though,
        > it
        > > > is
        > > > not some people's cup of tea, we loved the Crepe
        > > > Myrtle with its deep pink blooms that carpeted
        > the
        > > > back yard and its fragile green leaves. Mama did
        > not
        > > > mind the blooms covering the yard, but she did
        > mind
        > > > grass and refused to sow any after our uncle who
        > did
        > > > plant grass discovered stickers in his seed.
        > > > Because of the stickers, which Aunt Doris
        > called
        > > > "sand spurs," nobody could walk bare-footed in
        > the
        > > > yard without collecting a row of the sharp
        > spines in
        > > > his feet. We children let out many an "ouch"
        > leaving
        > > > our shoes behind to run over to see Aunt Doris
        > for
        > > > "just a minute."
        > > > Mama told us that many of our relatives had
        > had
        > > > the
        > > > same experience buying grass seed from the
        > traveling
        > > > salesman who went through the community that
        > year
        > > > selling his grass seeds.
        > > > Another favorite tree of many Southerners is
        > the
        > > > weeping willow. It's lacy leaves sweeping the
        > ground
        > > > remind me of the fullness and daintiness of a
        > prom
        > > > dress.
        > > > When many people think of Southern trees,
        > though,
        > > > they think of the Magnolia. My homesite was a
        > tree
        > > > farm, and guess what? It is surrounded my
        > Magnolias.
        > > > Its leaves and balls litter the ground nearly
        > year
        > > > round; that's the drawback. The upside is seeing
        > the
        > > > green leaves outside the kitchen window and
        > outside
        > > > the windows of the two bedrooms on that side of
        > the
        > > > house throughout the year.
        > > > If you do choose the Magnolia, though, plant
        > is
        > > > several yards from the house--preferably beyond
        > or
        > > > at
        > > > the very edge of your lawn. The roots sometimes
        > > > penetrate the ground, and with the leaves
        > covering
        > > > them, mowing the lawn means missing those roots
        > or
        > > > breaking the blade of the mower.
        > > > I believe that there are different species of
        > > > Magnolia. If so, a smaller species of this tree
        > > > would
        > > > be far less bother for the privilege of seeing
        > > > greenery outside the window year-round.
        > > > If you fancy fruit trees, peach and apple
        > > > blossoms
        > > > also remind me of prom dresses. An added bonus
        > is
        > > > having your own fruit.
        > > > Another Southern favorite is the elm tree,
        > and
        > > > these are coming back after many had been
        > destroyed
        > > > by
        > > > Dutch Elm Disease.
        > > > I also like oaks because I like having
        > squirrels.
        > > > When I had squirrels but no oaks, I gathered
        > acorns
        > > > at
        > > > my sister's house and from oaks overhanging the
        > > > sidewalks in my Richmond neighborhood and bagged
        > > > them
        > > > up to take home to my squirrels.
        > > > I do not believe that most people go nutting
        > to
        > > > fill the pantry of visiting squirrels, but
        > that's no
        > > > reason not to do it if you feel like it.
        > > > I hope that these suggestions will give you
        > some
        > > > ideas for your lovely property. Later, Carol
        > > >
        > > > --- L D Smith <ldsesq@...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > hey group.
        > > > > I am purchasing an old farm house in the
        > > > greenville
        > > > > area. while we will be
        > > > > saving the old trees on the property (the ones
        > > > that
        > > > > arent diseased or dying)
        > > > > we need some input on what else would be
        > > > appropriate
        > > > > for an early 20th
        > > > > century farm house. Any suggestions are
        > greatly
        > > > > obliged, particularly
        > > > > anything fast growing!!! we already have two
        > huge
        > > > > and fabulous pecans and
        > > > > chestnuts!
        > > > > Thanks.
        > > > > david smith
        > > > >
        > > > > From: "Jenny Jones"
        > <jennyjones54@...>
        > > > > Reply-To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > To: "PITT COUNTY N.C."
        > > > <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Chinaberry Tree
        > > > > Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2006 10:21:11 -0500
        > > > >
        > > > > Hi Friends Of E.C.G.S.,
        > > > > What fun I have had reading memories and
        > > > > information about the
        > > > > Chinaberry(Chaney Ball Tree)This group seems
        > to
        > > > take
        > > > > cultural history to
        > > > > heart.What a Joy!Thank you so much for
        > sharing.
        > > > > My Grandparents,Sue and Leonard Bruffey
        > lived
        > > > at
        > > > > 505 Whitehead Avenue in
        > > > > Wilson N.C from 1927 until 1960 when Atlantic
        > > > > Christian College(Now Barton)
        > > > > purchased their home and land and built what
        > is
        > > > now
        > > > > the Hackney Music
        > > > > Building.In their back yard was a huge
        > > > > Chinaberry("Chaney Ball") tree.Under
        > > > > that tree was the coolest place on earth in
        > > > Wilson's
        > > > > heat of summer.We girl
        >
        === message truncated ===


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