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Re: [genpcncfir] Hurricane Hazel

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  • Marcia McLawhorn
    Faye & Evelyn, I too attended high school in Onslow County [but on the Base], but one of my roommates at college was a JHS graduate. Our family also spent most
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 31 9:38 PM
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      Faye & Evelyn,
      I too attended high school in Onslow County [but on
      the Base], but one of my roommates at college was a
      JHS graduate.

      Our family also spent most of our time at the coast
      swimming, fishing and water skiing.

      I would LOVE to be in NC again, either Raleigh or
      nearer to the coast. I must claim good fortune that I
      did not live through any major hurricanes for the 12
      years that I lived in NC & Florida coastal areas. The
      worst for me was the 1954 hurricane season, which had
      three storms hit NJ where I lived. One took the roof
      off of our house.
      Hurricane Carol August, 1954.
      Hurricane Edna September, 1954.
      Hurricane Hazel October, 1954

      I was really surprised last July when I saw how much
      damage had been done to Camp Lejeune's beaches from a
      hurricane. None of the buildings I remembered existed.
      A local said the land shifted.

      We don't get hurricanes here in Chicago.
      Although last year, we were hoping that we would get
      some of the rainfall - it just missed.
      Marcia


      --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:

      > I graduated in 1948. It was still a small town then.
      > Ours was the largest graduating class they had ever
      > had. We graduated thirty that year. When my sons
      > graduated there were about 500 it seems.
      > Evelyn
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Faye Silliman
      > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, March 31, 2006 6:21 PM
      > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Hurricane Hazel
      >
      >
      > Now I live in Raleigh--I would rather be back home.
      >
      > Perhaps we already know each other--we may even be
      > related. I graduated from JHS in 1963. And no I am
      > not an old timer.
      >
      > Next time I head that way, I will get in touch.
      >
      > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Faye,
      > > I live in Jacksonville. Where here do you live?
      > > Maybe we could get together sometime.
      > > Evelyn
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Faye Silliman
      > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Friday, March 31, 2006 4:43 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Hurricane Hazel
      > >
      > >
      > > I was living in Jacksonville. The worst part was
      > the
      > > backside of the storm. We had water coming in so
      > > hard
      > > and fast through every crevice of the house. It
      > was
      > > a
      > > well-built house still standing today. We were
      > > baling
      > > out as fast as we could.
      > >
      > > My dad, a Navy corpsman at that time, ran supplies
      > > to
      > > Swansboro or as far as he could get to the coast
      > in
      > > his '50 Nash. He loaded the car with anything he
      > > could find to take to people--blankets, foods--a
      > lot
      > > of stuff was gathered from neighbors and the base.
      > >
      > > Our family spent all our time at the
      > coast...fishing
      > > and boating. I wanted to go with him but he
      > > wouldn't
      > > take us for about two weeks. It was still a sad
      > > sight.
      > >
      > > When I hear the word "hurricane." I don't wait
      > > around
      > > to see what it will do.
      > >
      > > In recent years, I lived at Emerald Isle. Our
      > house
      > > survived Bertha and Fran. What trees Bertha
      > didn't
      > > take, Fran did. But I went inland. I find it
      > > difficult to understand why people stay. It isn't
      > > so
      > > much the wind as it is the water. The wind is
      > > predictable, water makes it own path.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > http://www.csc.noaa.gov/products/nchaz/htm/hazel.htm
      > >
      > > This is a special detail from the above site:
      > >
      > > Hit during highest lunar tide of the year, with an
      > > 18-foot storm surge (in some areas). Most
      > > destructive
      > > hurricane to hit North Carolina. Record rainfall.
      > > Hurricane Hazel's path of destruction spread over
      > > 2,000 miles. Massive destruction to the beaches of
      > > New
      > > Hanover and Brunswick counties from tidal surge.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > My mother once told me that they were having a
      > > > "September storm" the day I was born. I later
      > > > realized what she referred to as a "September
      > > storm"
      > > > was actually a hurricane, or at least
      > approaching
      > > > hurricane level. I was born in 1929 and I don't
      > > > think anyone in the area had ever heard of a
      > > > hurricane.
      > > > I remember Hazel very well. It was the first big
      > > > storm after I was married. I had hung my clothes
      > > on
      > > > the line to dry that morning. You can imagine
      > what
      > > > happened to them. We had very little damage. The
      > > > bathroom roof leaked. The electricity was off.
      > > > Therefore, we had no water because we were on a
      > > well
      > > > with a water pump.
      > > > The next one I remember coming through was the
      > > next
      > > > year when we had several in a row. You can
      > better
      > > > believe I was prepared for them. I filled the
      > > > washing machine with water so we would have some
      > > to
      > > > drink and use for washing dishes. It was very
      > cool
      > > > during the storms. I had a child by that time,
      > but
      > > > the summers are so hot I had not bought a
      > blanket
      > > > for him. I wrapped him in beach towels. By the
      > > next
      > > > summer, when the next child was there, I bought
      > > > blankets and did not need them. By the way, the
      > > > first child was adopted. My children were not
      > born
      > > > that close together.
      > > > Evelyn
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: jonefa
      > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Thursday, March 30, 2006 8:02 AM
      > > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Hurricane Hazel
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hurricane Hazel is still remembered by "old
      > > timers"
      > > > as the worst hurricane to ever hit North
      > Carolina.
      > > >
      > > > While I think I read that it was only a Category
      > > 3?,
      > > > it certainly wasn't; but my son came home last
      > > > summer and said that one of the elderly
      > gentlemen
      > > > that he knew said that Hurricane Hazel from 1954
      > > was
      > > > still the worst hurricane he'd ever seen.
      > > >
      > > > There was no forewarning about the hurricane. I
      > > was
      > > > in high school when Hazel hit Wilson County and
      > > the
      > > > schools "locked down" (not a fifties phrase)
      > until
      > > > the hurricane blew over. I was in 8th grade home
      > > > economics class at Charles L. Coon High School
      > in
      > > > Wilson. We sang songs as we sat on the floor
      > (lots
      > > > of glass windows along the long home economics
      > > > classroom). The teacher tried to keep us as
      > > cheerful
      > > > as possible. We told stories and I don't even
      > > > remember being scared. After all, I'd never
      > seen
      > > or
      > > > been in a hurricane before.
      > > >
      > > > The windows in our classroom didn't break, but
      > the
      > > > home economics classroom across the hall was on
      > > the
      > > > front side of the building, and those windows
      > all
      > > > blew out.
      > > >
      > > > Walking home after the storm was over, you could
      > > see
      > > > the devastation that Hazel left. Trees down
      > > > everywhere. Streets were littered. Roofs off
      > > houses.
      > > > Power lines down. An assembly was called for all
      > > the
      > > > students at Charles L. Coon and we were told
      > that
      > > > the hurricane would hit Wilson and that we could
      > > > stay at school. If a parent wanted to come and
      > get
      > > > their children, they could, but as I remember,
      > few
      > > > left. There were not many missing students from
      > my
      >
      === message truncated ===


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    • Faye Silliman
      When I was in high school, the area still was relatively small so I had friends on and off the base. I think the military brats hung together. To me it was a
      Message 2 of 19 , Apr 1, 2006
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        When I was in high school, the area still was
        relatively small so I had friends on and off the base.
        I think the military brats hung together. To me it
        was a very divided group run by cliques.

        I have traveled many places but I love the NC coast.
        I just wish more had been done to protect our barrier
        islands.

        Memories are tied to places in time.

        --- Marcia McLawhorn <marcia_mclawhorn@...>
        wrote:

        > Faye & Evelyn,
        > I too attended high school in Onslow County [but on
        > the Base], but one of my roommates at college was a
        > JHS graduate.
        >
        > Our family also spent most of our time at the coast
        > swimming, fishing and water skiing.
        >
        > I would LOVE to be in NC again, either Raleigh or
        > nearer to the coast. I must claim good fortune that
        > I
        > did not live through any major hurricanes for the 12
        > years that I lived in NC & Florida coastal areas.
        > The
        > worst for me was the 1954 hurricane season, which
        > had
        > three storms hit NJ where I lived. One took the roof
        > off of our house.
        > Hurricane Carol August, 1954.
        > Hurricane Edna September, 1954.
        > Hurricane Hazel October, 1954
        >
        > I was really surprised last July when I saw how much
        > damage had been done to Camp Lejeune's beaches from
        > a
        > hurricane. None of the buildings I remembered
        > existed.
        > A local said the land shifted.
        >
        > We don't get hurricanes here in Chicago.
        > Although last year, we were hoping that we would get
        > some of the rainfall - it just missed.
        > Marcia
        >
        >
        > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
        >
        > > I graduated in 1948. It was still a small town
        > then.
        > > Ours was the largest graduating class they had
        > ever
        > > had. We graduated thirty that year. When my sons
        > > graduated there were about 500 it seems.
        > > Evelyn
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Faye Silliman
        > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Friday, March 31, 2006 6:21 PM
        > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Hurricane Hazel
        > >
        > >
        > > Now I live in Raleigh--I would rather be back
        > home.
        > >
        > > Perhaps we already know each other--we may even be
        > > related. I graduated from JHS in 1963. And no I
        > am
        > > not an old timer.
        > >
        > > Next time I head that way, I will get in touch.
        > >
        > > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > Faye,
        > > > I live in Jacksonville. Where here do you live?
        > > > Maybe we could get together sometime.
        > > > Evelyn
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > > From: Faye Silliman
        > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Sent: Friday, March 31, 2006 4:43 PM
        > > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Hurricane Hazel
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > I was living in Jacksonville. The worst part was
        > > the
        > > > backside of the storm. We had water coming in
        > so
        > > > hard
        > > > and fast through every crevice of the house. It
        > > was
        > > > a
        > > > well-built house still standing today. We were
        > > > baling
        > > > out as fast as we could.
        > > >
        > > > My dad, a Navy corpsman at that time, ran
        > supplies
        > > > to
        > > > Swansboro or as far as he could get to the coast
        > > in
        > > > his '50 Nash. He loaded the car with anything
        > he
        > > > could find to take to people--blankets, foods--a
        > > lot
        > > > of stuff was gathered from neighbors and the
        > base.
        > > >
        > > > Our family spent all our time at the
        > > coast...fishing
        > > > and boating. I wanted to go with him but he
        > > > wouldn't
        > > > take us for about two weeks. It was still a sad
        > > > sight.
        > > >
        > > > When I hear the word "hurricane." I don't wait
        > > > around
        > > > to see what it will do.
        > > >
        > > > In recent years, I lived at Emerald Isle. Our
        > > house
        > > > survived Bertha and Fran. What trees Bertha
        > > didn't
        > > > take, Fran did. But I went inland. I find it
        > > > difficult to understand why people stay. It
        > isn't
        > > > so
        > > > much the wind as it is the water. The wind is
        > > > predictable, water makes it own path.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > http://www.csc.noaa.gov/products/nchaz/htm/hazel.htm
        > > >
        > > > This is a special detail from the above site:
        > > >
        > > > Hit during highest lunar tide of the year, with
        > an
        > > > 18-foot storm surge (in some areas). Most
        > > > destructive
        > > > hurricane to hit North Carolina. Record
        > rainfall.
        > > > Hurricane Hazel's path of destruction spread
        > over
        > > > 2,000 miles. Massive destruction to the beaches
        > of
        > > > New
        > > > Hanover and Brunswick counties from tidal surge.
        >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > My mother once told me that they were having a
        > > > > "September storm" the day I was born. I later
        > > > > realized what she referred to as a "September
        > > > storm"
        > > > > was actually a hurricane, or at least
        > > approaching
        > > > > hurricane level. I was born in 1929 and I
        > don't
        > > > > think anyone in the area had ever heard of a
        > > > > hurricane.
        > > > > I remember Hazel very well. It was the first
        > big
        > > > > storm after I was married. I had hung my
        > clothes
        > > > on
        > > > > the line to dry that morning. You can imagine
        > > what
        > > > > happened to them. We had very little damage.
        > The
        > > > > bathroom roof leaked. The electricity was off.
        > > > > Therefore, we had no water because we were on
        > a
        > > > well
        > > > > with a water pump.
        > > > > The next one I remember coming through was the
        > > > next
        > > > > year when we had several in a row. You can
        > > better
        > > > > believe I was prepared for them. I filled the
        > > > > washing machine with water so we would have
        > some
        > > > to
        > > > > drink and use for washing dishes. It was very
        > > cool
        > > > > during the storms. I had a child by that time,
        > > but
        > > > > the summers are so hot I had not bought a
        > > blanket
        > > > > for him. I wrapped him in beach towels. By the
        > > > next
        > > > > summer, when the next child was there, I
        > bought
        > > > > blankets and did not need them. By the way,
        > the
        > > > > first child was adopted. My children were not
        > > born
        > > > > that close together.
        > > > > Evelyn
        > > > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > > > From: jonefa
        > > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > Sent: Thursday, March 30, 2006 8:02 AM
        > > > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Hurricane Hazel
        >
        === message truncated ===


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      • Carol Singh
        Dear Faye, Good for you! I m NOT old either!! Later, carol ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail
        Message 3 of 19 , Apr 3, 2006
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          Dear Faye,
          Good for you! I'm NOT old either!!
          Later, carol

          --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

          > What do you mean old timers. I was nine years old
          > and
          > will never forget it.
          >
          > --- jonefa <jonefa@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Hurricane Hazel is still remembered by "old
          > timers"
          > > as the worst hurricane to ever hit North Carolina.
          > >
          > > While I think I read that it was only a Category
          > 3?,
          > > it certainly wasn't; but my son came home last
          > > summer and said that one of the elderly gentlemen
          > > that he knew said that Hurricane Hazel from 1954
          > was
          > > still the worst hurricane he'd ever seen.
          > >
          > > There was no forewarning about the hurricane. I
          > was
          > > in high school when Hazel hit Wilson County and
          > the
          > > schools "locked down" (not a fifties phrase) until
          > > the hurricane blew over. I was in 8th grade home
          > > economics class at Charles L. Coon High School in
          > > Wilson. We sang songs as we sat on the floor (lots
          > > of glass windows along the long home economics
          > > classroom). The teacher tried to keep us as
          > cheerful
          > > as possible. We told stories and I don't even
          > > remember being scared. After all, I'd never seen
          > or
          > > been in a hurricane before.
          > >
          > > The windows in our classroom didn't break, but the
          > > home economics classroom across the hall was on
          > the
          > > front side of the building, and those windows all
          > > blew out.
          > >
          > > Walking home after the storm was over, you could
          > see
          > > the devastation that Hazel left. Trees down
          > > everywhere. Streets were littered. Roofs off
          > houses.
          > > Power lines down. An assembly was called for all
          > the
          > > students at Charles L. Coon and we were told that
          > > the hurricane would hit Wilson and that we could
          > > stay at school. If a parent wanted to come and get
          > > their children, they could, but as I remember, few
          > > left. There were not many missing students from my
          > > home economics class.
          > >
          > > Mama said she had never seen a storm like Hazel
          > and
          > > didn't ever remember a hurricane coming through
          > > Wilson. Lots of people said the same thing. Hazel
          > > was the beginning of hurricane "memory" for most
          > of
          > > us.
          > >
          > > Faye Hays
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
          > > removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
          > protection around
          > http://mail.yahoo.com
          >


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        • Carol Singh
          Faye, Like you, I was a little kid. Mama and Uncle Mark were in Richmond that day. I don t think they believed that the hurricane was going to hit us here. We
          Message 4 of 19 , Apr 3, 2006
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            Faye,
            Like you, I was a little kid. Mama and Uncle Mark
            were in Richmond that day. I don't think they believed
            that the hurricane was going to hit us here. We were
            home alone, my two younger brothers, baby sister, and
            I. Our farm was a mile from the nearest neighbor and
            even farther from the nearest neighbor whom we knew to
            be home.
            The storm struck suddenly, no warning. The sky got
            dark as night, and the wind started howling like a dog
            in its last agony. We ran upstairs where we could see
            what was happening.
            There was a big flash of lightning and a deafening
            cracking sound. We thought the roof had gone, but
            seeing no daylight above us, we looked out the window.
            To our horror, the walnut tree that was as big around
            as a 500-gallon drum shook in the ground as if it were
            having a seizure. Next thing we new, it rose up like a
            rocket and headed straight for the sky. When it was
            higher than the house, it turned upside down and
            returned to earth with such a thud the house shook.
            That's when I remembered that the cows were still
            in the pasture. Heaven help me! I told the others that
            I had to go get the cows in and see to the mules. My
            older brother said he'd go with me. For the first time
            in my life, I didn't put on a front and order him to
            stay behind. Instead, I told the others not to leave
            the room, and I took Alvis and we headed for the barns
            and the pasture.
            Fortunately, the mules were in their stables, and I
            had only to lock their stalls. The cows were just
            inside the woods beyond the fallen walnut tree.
            The hole in the earth where the tree had been was
            so wide we had to use the fallen tree for a foot
            bridge to get across the pasture at that point. We
            didn't talk. We just did what we had to do.
            When we got to the cows, they were sopping wet,
            mooing softly, and ready to trot at the first excuse.
            Alvis got behind them, and I positioned myself in
            front of the lead cow and grabbed her halter. We took
            them across the pasture away from the walnut tree to
            their stalls and secured them in. Afterwards, we
            filled their troughs with fresh hay and headed for the
            house.
            We felt like drowned rats. The whole time the rain
            was coming down torrentially, and the wind nearly
            swept us off our feet. The lightning flashed, and the
            thunder boomed repeatedly, enough to scare a person
            out of his skin. Neither of us had grabbed a jacket in
            our hurry, and our clothes were plastered to us, our
            shoes ruined as if we had been wading in them.
            Back inside the house, we ran upstairs to comfort
            the younger ones and shed our clothes. Some hours
            later Mama and Uncle Mark returned, relieved that
            everyone was safe.
            The phone lines had gone down off the bat, so
            nobody had been able to call to check on us. Mama and
            Uncle Mark were caught in flooding and heavy traffic
            on their 20+ mile journey from Richmond, but
            fortunately for us, they made it home safely. Later,
            Carol

            --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

            > Dear Faye,
            > Good for you! I'm NOT old either!!
            > Later, carol
            >
            > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
            >
            > > What do you mean old timers. I was nine years old
            > > and
            > > will never forget it.
            > >
            > > --- jonefa <jonefa@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > > Hurricane Hazel is still remembered by "old
            > > timers"
            > > > as the worst hurricane to ever hit North
            > Carolina.
            > > >
            > > > While I think I read that it was only a Category
            > > 3?,
            > > > it certainly wasn't; but my son came home last
            > > > summer and said that one of the elderly
            > gentlemen
            > > > that he knew said that Hurricane Hazel from 1954
            > > was
            > > > still the worst hurricane he'd ever seen.
            > > >
            > > > There was no forewarning about the hurricane. I
            > > was
            > > > in high school when Hazel hit Wilson County and
            > > the
            > > > schools "locked down" (not a fifties phrase)
            > until
            > > > the hurricane blew over. I was in 8th grade home
            > > > economics class at Charles L. Coon High School
            > in
            > > > Wilson. We sang songs as we sat on the floor
            > (lots
            > > > of glass windows along the long home economics
            > > > classroom). The teacher tried to keep us as
            > > cheerful
            > > > as possible. We told stories and I don't even
            > > > remember being scared. After all, I'd never
            > seen
            > > or
            > > > been in a hurricane before.
            > > >
            > > > The windows in our classroom didn't break, but
            > the
            > > > home economics classroom across the hall was on
            > > the
            > > > front side of the building, and those windows
            > all
            > > > blew out.
            > > >
            > > > Walking home after the storm was over, you could
            > > see
            > > > the devastation that Hazel left. Trees down
            > > > everywhere. Streets were littered. Roofs off
            > > houses.
            > > > Power lines down. An assembly was called for all
            > > the
            > > > students at Charles L. Coon and we were told
            > that
            > > > the hurricane would hit Wilson and that we could
            > > > stay at school. If a parent wanted to come and
            > get
            > > > their children, they could, but as I remember,
            > few
            > > > left. There were not many missing students from
            > my
            > > > home economics class.
            > > >
            > > > Mama said she had never seen a storm like Hazel
            > > and
            > > > didn't ever remember a hurricane coming through
            > > > Wilson. Lots of people said the same thing.
            > Hazel
            > > > was the beginning of hurricane "memory" for most
            > > of
            > > > us.
            > > >
            > > > Faye Hays
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > > > removed]
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > __________________________________________________
            > > Do You Yahoo!?
            > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
            > > protection around
            > > http://mail.yahoo.com
            > >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________________________
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          • Faye Silliman
            Age is definitely a state of mind. My mind is still 16. ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has
            Message 5 of 19 , Apr 3, 2006
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              Age is definitely a state of mind.

              My mind is still 16.

              --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

              > Dear Faye,
              > Good for you! I'm NOT old either!!
              > Later, carol
              >
              > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
              >
              > > What do you mean old timers. I was nine years old
              > > and
              > > will never forget it.
              > >
              > > --- jonefa <jonefa@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > > Hurricane Hazel is still remembered by "old
              > > timers"
              > > > as the worst hurricane to ever hit North
              > Carolina.
              > > >
              > > > While I think I read that it was only a Category
              > > 3?,
              > > > it certainly wasn't; but my son came home last
              > > > summer and said that one of the elderly
              > gentlemen
              > > > that he knew said that Hurricane Hazel from 1954
              > > was
              > > > still the worst hurricane he'd ever seen.
              > > >
              > > > There was no forewarning about the hurricane. I
              > > was
              > > > in high school when Hazel hit Wilson County and
              > > the
              > > > schools "locked down" (not a fifties phrase)
              > until
              > > > the hurricane blew over. I was in 8th grade home
              > > > economics class at Charles L. Coon High School
              > in
              > > > Wilson. We sang songs as we sat on the floor
              > (lots
              > > > of glass windows along the long home economics
              > > > classroom). The teacher tried to keep us as
              > > cheerful
              > > > as possible. We told stories and I don't even
              > > > remember being scared. After all, I'd never
              > seen
              > > or
              > > > been in a hurricane before.
              > > >
              > > > The windows in our classroom didn't break, but
              > the
              > > > home economics classroom across the hall was on
              > > the
              > > > front side of the building, and those windows
              > all
              > > > blew out.
              > > >
              > > > Walking home after the storm was over, you could
              > > see
              > > > the devastation that Hazel left. Trees down
              > > > everywhere. Streets were littered. Roofs off
              > > houses.
              > > > Power lines down. An assembly was called for all
              > > the
              > > > students at Charles L. Coon and we were told
              > that
              > > > the hurricane would hit Wilson and that we could
              > > > stay at school. If a parent wanted to come and
              > get
              > > > their children, they could, but as I remember,
              > few
              > > > left. There were not many missing students from
              > my
              > > > home economics class.
              > > >
              > > > Mama said she had never seen a storm like Hazel
              > > and
              > > > didn't ever remember a hurricane coming through
              > > > Wilson. Lots of people said the same thing.
              > Hazel
              > > > was the beginning of hurricane "memory" for most
              > > of
              > > > us.
              > > >
              > > > Faye Hays
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > > > removed]
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > > __________________________________________________
              > > Do You Yahoo!?
              > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
              > > protection around
              > > http://mail.yahoo.com
              > >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________________________
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              > protection around
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            • Faye Silliman
              Wow...you words put me right there. What sticks most in my mind is how surreal it was when the eye went over. The sky was murky gray and there wasn t a
              Message 6 of 19 , Apr 3, 2006
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                Wow...you words put me right there.

                What sticks most in my mind is how surreal it was when
                the eye went over. The sky was murky gray and there
                wasn't a sound...no dogs barking. I went outside to
                look around. I could hardly breathe. It was like
                there was little oxygen. My dad came after me and told
                me to get back in the house. Then he ran up and down
                the street yelling at the neighbors, who thought he
                had gone crazy. He was usually a quiet man. He had
                been through storms in the south pacific and knew what
                was about to happen.

                The backside of Hazel hit the side of the house with a
                huge bang and then sounded like a freight train. The
                house rocked and more water poured in and we swept it
                down the floor furnace trying to keep dry as we could.
                The roof never leaked but the walls leaked like a
                sieve.

                I get chills writing about it.

                --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:

                > Faye,
                > Like you, I was a little kid. Mama and Uncle Mark
                > were in Richmond that day. I don't think they
                > believed
                > that the hurricane was going to hit us here. We were
                > home alone, my two younger brothers, baby sister,
                > and
                > I. Our farm was a mile from the nearest neighbor and
                > even farther from the nearest neighbor whom we knew
                > to
                > be home.
                > The storm struck suddenly, no warning. The sky got
                > dark as night, and the wind started howling like a
                > dog
                > in its last agony. We ran upstairs where we could
                > see
                > what was happening.
                > There was a big flash of lightning and a deafening
                > cracking sound. We thought the roof had gone, but
                > seeing no daylight above us, we looked out the
                > window.
                > To our horror, the walnut tree that was as big
                > around
                > as a 500-gallon drum shook in the ground as if it
                > were
                > having a seizure. Next thing we new, it rose up like
                > a
                > rocket and headed straight for the sky. When it was
                > higher than the house, it turned upside down and
                > returned to earth with such a thud the house shook.
                > That's when I remembered that the cows were still
                > in the pasture. Heaven help me! I told the others
                > that
                > I had to go get the cows in and see to the mules. My
                > older brother said he'd go with me. For the first
                > time
                > in my life, I didn't put on a front and order him to
                > stay behind. Instead, I told the others not to leave
                > the room, and I took Alvis and we headed for the
                > barns
                > and the pasture.
                > Fortunately, the mules were in their stables, and
                > I
                > had only to lock their stalls. The cows were just
                > inside the woods beyond the fallen walnut tree.
                > The hole in the earth where the tree had been was
                > so wide we had to use the fallen tree for a foot
                > bridge to get across the pasture at that point. We
                > didn't talk. We just did what we had to do.
                > When we got to the cows, they were sopping wet,
                > mooing softly, and ready to trot at the first
                > excuse.
                > Alvis got behind them, and I positioned myself in
                > front of the lead cow and grabbed her halter. We
                > took
                > them across the pasture away from the walnut tree to
                > their stalls and secured them in. Afterwards, we
                > filled their troughs with fresh hay and headed for
                > the
                > house.
                > We felt like drowned rats. The whole time the
                > rain
                > was coming down torrentially, and the wind nearly
                > swept us off our feet. The lightning flashed, and
                > the
                > thunder boomed repeatedly, enough to scare a person
                > out of his skin. Neither of us had grabbed a jacket
                > in
                > our hurry, and our clothes were plastered to us, our
                > shoes ruined as if we had been wading in them.
                > Back inside the house, we ran upstairs to comfort
                > the younger ones and shed our clothes. Some hours
                > later Mama and Uncle Mark returned, relieved that
                > everyone was safe.
                > The phone lines had gone down off the bat, so
                > nobody had been able to call to check on us. Mama
                > and
                > Uncle Mark were caught in flooding and heavy traffic
                > on their 20+ mile journey from Richmond, but
                > fortunately for us, they made it home safely. Later,
                > Carol
                >
                > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Dear Faye,
                > > Good for you! I'm NOT old either!!
                > > Later, carol
                > >
                > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > > What do you mean old timers. I was nine years
                > old
                > > > and
                > > > will never forget it.
                > > >
                > > > --- jonefa <jonefa@...> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > > Hurricane Hazel is still remembered by "old
                > > > timers"
                > > > > as the worst hurricane to ever hit North
                > > Carolina.
                > > > >
                > > > > While I think I read that it was only a
                > Category
                > > > 3?,
                > > > > it certainly wasn't; but my son came home last
                > > > > summer and said that one of the elderly
                > > gentlemen
                > > > > that he knew said that Hurricane Hazel from
                > 1954
                > > > was
                > > > > still the worst hurricane he'd ever seen.
                > > > >
                > > > > There was no forewarning about the hurricane.
                > I
                > > > was
                > > > > in high school when Hazel hit Wilson County
                > and
                > > > the
                > > > > schools "locked down" (not a fifties phrase)
                > > until
                > > > > the hurricane blew over. I was in 8th grade
                > home
                > > > > economics class at Charles L. Coon High School
                > > in
                > > > > Wilson. We sang songs as we sat on the floor
                > > (lots
                > > > > of glass windows along the long home economics
                > > > > classroom). The teacher tried to keep us as
                > > > cheerful
                > > > > as possible. We told stories and I don't even
                > > > > remember being scared. After all, I'd never
                > > seen
                > > > or
                > > > > been in a hurricane before.
                > > > >
                > > > > The windows in our classroom didn't break, but
                > > the
                > > > > home economics classroom across the hall was
                > on
                > > > the
                > > > > front side of the building, and those windows
                > > all
                > > > > blew out.
                > > > >
                > > > > Walking home after the storm was over, you
                > could
                > > > see
                > > > > the devastation that Hazel left. Trees down
                > > > > everywhere. Streets were littered. Roofs off
                > > > houses.
                > > > > Power lines down. An assembly was called for
                > all
                > > > the
                > > > > students at Charles L. Coon and we were told
                > > that
                > > > > the hurricane would hit Wilson and that we
                > could
                > > > > stay at school. If a parent wanted to come and
                > > get
                > > > > their children, they could, but as I remember,
                > > few
                > > > > left. There were not many missing students
                > from
                > > my
                > > > > home economics class.
                > > > >
                > > > > Mama said she had never seen a storm like
                > Hazel
                > > > and
                > > > > didn't ever remember a hurricane coming
                > through
                > > > > Wilson. Lots of people said the same thing.
                > > Hazel
                > > > > was the beginning of hurricane "memory" for
                > most
                > > > of
                > > > > us.
                > > > >
                > > > > Faye Hays
                > > > >
                > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > > > > removed]
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > __________________________________________________
                > > > Do You Yahoo!?
                > > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                > > > protection around
                > > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > > __________________________________________________
                > > Do You Yahoo!?
                > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                > > protection around
                > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                >
                === message truncated ===


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              • Carol Singh
                Dear Faye, Very true! There are young souls and old souls. Because of early responsibilities, I was very much an old soul. Finally, in my 30 s, I discovered
                Message 7 of 19 , Apr 4, 2006
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                  Dear Faye,
                  Very true! There are young souls and old souls.
                  Because of early responsibilities, I was very much an
                  old soul. Finally, in my 30's, I discovered the joy
                  that Mama was always talking about and that had made
                  me wonder what planet she was from. To plagarize the
                  J. C. Penney's Ad: "It's all inside." Later, Carol

                  --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:

                  > Age is definitely a state of mind.
                  >
                  > My mind is still 16.
                  >
                  > --- Carol Singh <csinghworthington@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > Dear Faye,
                  > > Good for you! I'm NOT old either!!
                  > > Later, carol
                  > >
                  > > --- Faye Silliman <eyafydal@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > What do you mean old timers. I was nine years
                  > old
                  > > > and
                  > > > will never forget it.
                  > > >
                  > > > --- jonefa <jonefa@...> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > > Hurricane Hazel is still remembered by "old
                  > > > timers"
                  > > > > as the worst hurricane to ever hit North
                  > > Carolina.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > While I think I read that it was only a
                  > Category
                  > > > 3?,
                  > > > > it certainly wasn't; but my son came home last
                  > > > > summer and said that one of the elderly
                  > > gentlemen
                  > > > > that he knew said that Hurricane Hazel from
                  > 1954
                  > > > was
                  > > > > still the worst hurricane he'd ever seen.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > There was no forewarning about the hurricane.
                  > I
                  > > > was
                  > > > > in high school when Hazel hit Wilson County
                  > and
                  > > > the
                  > > > > schools "locked down" (not a fifties phrase)
                  > > until
                  > > > > the hurricane blew over. I was in 8th grade
                  > home
                  > > > > economics class at Charles L. Coon High School
                  > > in
                  > > > > Wilson. We sang songs as we sat on the floor
                  > > (lots
                  > > > > of glass windows along the long home economics
                  > > > > classroom). The teacher tried to keep us as
                  > > > cheerful
                  > > > > as possible. We told stories and I don't even
                  > > > > remember being scared. After all, I'd never
                  > > seen
                  > > > or
                  > > > > been in a hurricane before.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The windows in our classroom didn't break, but
                  > > the
                  > > > > home economics classroom across the hall was
                  > on
                  > > > the
                  > > > > front side of the building, and those windows
                  > > all
                  > > > > blew out.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Walking home after the storm was over, you
                  > could
                  > > > see
                  > > > > the devastation that Hazel left. Trees down
                  > > > > everywhere. Streets were littered. Roofs off
                  > > > houses.
                  > > > > Power lines down. An assembly was called for
                  > all
                  > > > the
                  > > > > students at Charles L. Coon and we were told
                  > > that
                  > > > > the hurricane would hit Wilson and that we
                  > could
                  > > > > stay at school. If a parent wanted to come and
                  > > get
                  > > > > their children, they could, but as I remember,
                  > > few
                  > > > > left. There were not many missing students
                  > from
                  > > my
                  > > > > home economics class.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Mama said she had never seen a storm like
                  > Hazel
                  > > > and
                  > > > > didn't ever remember a hurricane coming
                  > through
                  > > > > Wilson. Lots of people said the same thing.
                  > > Hazel
                  > > > > was the beginning of hurricane "memory" for
                  > most
                  > > > of
                  > > > > us.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Faye Hays
                  > > > >
                  > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                  > > > > removed]
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > > > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                  > > > protection around
                  > > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > __________________________________________________
                  > > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                  > > protection around
                  > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
                  > protection around
                  > http://mail.yahoo.com
                  >


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