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Re: [genpcncfir] Indian Heritage

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  • Trish Worthington Cobb
    Lou, I like that tradition of the name Toisnot. Not to cast doubt on the meaning of the name, but Powell in his NC Gazetteer writes that the name was derived
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 3, 2005
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      Lou,
      I like that tradition of the name Toisnot.
      Not to cast doubt on the meaning of the name, but Powell in his NC
      Gazetteer writes that the name was derived from a Tuscarora Indian town
      named Tosneoc near the confluence of Buck Branch and Toisnot Swamp. He
      also, writes that until the 1850s the name was spelled Tosneot.
      Thanks for letting us know the way the name is pronounced. I had been
      saying "toys-not."
      I am glad some of these old names are still used for the natural
      features of our state.
      Trish

      On Dec 3, 2005, at 3:46 PM, Lou-BB wrote:

      > Jo,
      > I found your Indian Heritage article very interesting. I'm putting
      > together
      > another book called, "Elm City RFD, not Mayberry," and I mention the
      > Tuscarora Indians. Small world!~!~! Lou-BB.
      > The following was written by Mr. J.T. Watson:
      > The History of Toisnot-Elm City from 1873-1932
      > By J. T. Watson 1931
      > Perhaps it will be of interest to some to know that the town of Elm
      > City was
      > first named Toisnot. It was in the year of our Lord 1873 that Toisnot
      > came
      > into existence. It is situated in the northeastern part of Wilson
      > County, on
      > the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. Toisnot is an Indian name that was
      > given
      > by them to a swampy creek, which has been noted for the abundance of
      > fish
      > and snakes.
      >
      > Tradition tells us that when the Tuscarora Indians inhabited this
      > section
      > that they were crossing this swamp at or near where the railroad
      > crosses it,
      > they came to a shady ledge and decided to rest. While sitting there an
      > Indian Squaw spied a huge snake lying on a boulder nearby, sprang to
      > her
      > feet and exclaimed "TOSS NOT," meaning in their language to "TARRY
      > NOT."
      > From that day to this the stream has been known as "Toisnot Swamp."
      > Though
      > spelled Toisnot it is pronounced Toss-Not.
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Jo Webb" <jowebb@...>
      > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Saturday, December 03, 2005 1:23 PM
      > Subject: [genpcncfir] Indian Heritage
      >
      >
      >> Before arrival of Raleigh's colonist the Tuscarora Confederacy, of
      > Iroquoian Stock were in control of practically all of NC, from the
      > coastal
      > plains west of the band of low-lying coastal swamps to the piedmont,
      > and
      > from the present Va. line southward to the Cape Fear River.
      >>
      >> There were hundreds of villages of Tuscarora, on every waterway and
      > tributary in NC. The villages were spaced twenty to thirty miles from
      > each
      > other, so that each village would have room to hunt and fish without
      > dwindling the natural resources.
      >>
      >> The Tuscarora had a matriarchal society, consisting of Clans. The
      >> child
      > always followed the mothers Clan and mating within the same Clan was
      > prohibited. Each village or Clan had their own Chief, Sub or War
      > Chief,
      > Shaman, Medicine people, and Council, chosen by the Clan Mothers.
      >>
      >> The Tuscarora ranged 50 to 100 miles from their towns along the
      >> Roanoke,
      > Tar-Pamlico, Haw and Neuse river to fish and gather, and hunt.
      > Traders also
      > followed trails from the coast to the foothills, exercising a monopoly
      > on
      > trade between the coast and the piedmont. Sometimes the Tuscarora
      > built
      > towns for hunting quarters. The Tuscarora language was understood by
      > most
      > tribes and was the trade language used, and also the Tuscaroras's were
      > referred to by the white men as the first "five percent men". Meaning
      > they
      > charged passage through their country, on their ferry systems, in which
      > large hemp ropes lay across rivers, and creeks and log barges were
      > pulled
      > across. A copy of this system still exists today called the Sans Souci
      > Ferry in Bertie County, North Carolina.
      >>
      >> Source:Tuscarora Southern Ban Indidan Tribe
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Pitt County Historical Society:
      > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
      >>
      >> CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
      > information:
      >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
      >>
      >> Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
      >> http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
      >>
      >> RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
      > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
      > Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
      >>
      >> Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
      > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
      >>
      >> http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
      >>
      >> We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic
      >> group
      > if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and
      > all
      > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
      >> GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
      >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
      >>
      >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Pitt County Historical Society:
      > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
      >
      > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
      > information:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
      >
      > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
      > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
      >
      > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
      >
      > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
      > Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
      >
      > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
      > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
      >
      > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
      >
      > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic
      > group if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in
      > Pitt and all Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
      > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Lou-BB
      Trish, What I emailed came from a small pamphlet written by Mr. Watson in 1931. That s all I can tell you. During my 65 + years, I have heard it pronounced as
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 3, 2005
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        Trish,
        What I emailed came from a small pamphlet written by Mr. Watson in 1931.
        That's all I can tell you. During my 65 + years, I have heard it pronounced
        as Toe-is-not.I like Toss-not better, though. Haven't read anything by Mr.
        Powell.
        Linda B
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Trish Worthington Cobb" <turniproots@...>
        To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, December 03, 2005 8:39 PM
        Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Indian Heritage


        > Lou,
        > I like that tradition of the name Toisnot.
        > Not to cast doubt on the meaning of the name, but Powell in his NC
        > Gazetteer writes that the name was derived from a Tuscarora Indian town
        > named Tosneoc near the confluence of Buck Branch and Toisnot Swamp. He
        > also, writes that until the 1850s the name was spelled Tosneot.
        > Thanks for letting us know the way the name is pronounced. I had been
        > saying "toys-not."
        > I am glad some of these old names are still used for the natural
        > features of our state.
        > Trish
        >
        > On Dec 3, 2005, at 3:46 PM, Lou-BB wrote:
        >
        > > Jo,
        > > I found your Indian Heritage article very interesting. I'm putting
        > > together
        > > another book called, "Elm City RFD, not Mayberry," and I mention the
        > > Tuscarora Indians. Small world!~!~! Lou-BB.
        > > The following was written by Mr. J.T. Watson:
        > > The History of Toisnot-Elm City from 1873-1932
        > > By J. T. Watson 1931
        > > Perhaps it will be of interest to some to know that the town of Elm
        > > City was
        > > first named Toisnot. It was in the year of our Lord 1873 that Toisnot
        > > came
        > > into existence. It is situated in the northeastern part of Wilson
        > > County, on
        > > the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. Toisnot is an Indian name that was
        > > given
        > > by them to a swampy creek, which has been noted for the abundance of
        > > fish
        > > and snakes.
        > >
        > > Tradition tells us that when the Tuscarora Indians inhabited this
        > > section
        > > that they were crossing this swamp at or near where the railroad
        > > crosses it,
        > > they came to a shady ledge and decided to rest. While sitting there an
        > > Indian Squaw spied a huge snake lying on a boulder nearby, sprang to
        > > her
        > > feet and exclaimed "TOSS NOT," meaning in their language to "TARRY
        > > NOT."
        > > From that day to this the stream has been known as "Toisnot Swamp."
        > > Though
        > > spelled Toisnot it is pronounced Toss-Not.
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: "Jo Webb" <jowebb@...>
        > > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Saturday, December 03, 2005 1:23 PM
        > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Indian Heritage
        > >
        > >
        > >> Before arrival of Raleigh's colonist the Tuscarora Confederacy, of
        > > Iroquoian Stock were in control of practically all of NC, from the
        > > coastal
        > > plains west of the band of low-lying coastal swamps to the piedmont,
        > > and
        > > from the present Va. line southward to the Cape Fear River.
        > >>
        > >> There were hundreds of villages of Tuscarora, on every waterway and
        > > tributary in NC. The villages were spaced twenty to thirty miles from
        > > each
        > > other, so that each village would have room to hunt and fish without
        > > dwindling the natural resources.
        > >>
        > >> The Tuscarora had a matriarchal society, consisting of Clans. The
        > >> child
        > > always followed the mothers Clan and mating within the same Clan was
        > > prohibited. Each village or Clan had their own Chief, Sub or War
        > > Chief,
        > > Shaman, Medicine people, and Council, chosen by the Clan Mothers.
        > >>
        > >> The Tuscarora ranged 50 to 100 miles from their towns along the
        > >> Roanoke,
        > > Tar-Pamlico, Haw and Neuse river to fish and gather, and hunt.
        > > Traders also
        > > followed trails from the coast to the foothills, exercising a monopoly
        > > on
        > > trade between the coast and the piedmont. Sometimes the Tuscarora
        > > built
        > > towns for hunting quarters. The Tuscarora language was understood by
        > > most
        > > tribes and was the trade language used, and also the Tuscaroras's were
        > > referred to by the white men as the first "five percent men". Meaning
        > > they
        > > charged passage through their country, on their ferry systems, in which
        > > large hemp ropes lay across rivers, and creeks and log barges were
        > > pulled
        > > across. A copy of this system still exists today called the Sans Souci
        > > Ferry in Bertie County, North Carolina.
        > >>
        > >> Source:Tuscarora Southern Ban Indidan Tribe
        > >>
        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> Pitt County Historical Society:
        > > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
        > >>
        > >> CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
        > > information:
        > >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
        > >>
        > >> Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
        > >> http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
        > >>
        > >> RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
        > > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
        > > Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
        > >>
        > >> Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
        > > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
        > >>
        > >> http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
        > >>
        > >> We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic
        > >> group
        > > if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and
        > > all
        > > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
        > >> GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
        > >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
        > >>
        > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Pitt County Historical Society:
        > > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
        > >
        > > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
        > > information:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
        > >
        > > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
        > > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
        > >
        > > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
        > >
        > > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
        > > Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
        > >
        > > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
        > > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
        > >
        > > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
        > >
        > > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic
        > > group if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in
        > > Pitt and all Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
        > > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Pitt County Historical Society:
        http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
        >
        > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
        information:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
        >
        > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
        > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
        >
        > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
        http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
        >
        > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
        http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
        >
        > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
        >
        > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
        if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
        Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
        > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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