Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base

Expand Messages
  • Rhet Wilkinson
    Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the reinactment is important to you, but I would really like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother s brother) in Italy
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 25, 2005
      Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the reinactment is important to you, but I would really like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's brother) in Italy during WWII so I know that those things can be very important to us. How about sharing why, if you don't mind. If you want to keep it private, however I am sure we will all understand and just be happy for you that you can be a part of something special to you. Rhet
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: jewellebaker@...
      To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
      Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


      Hello Group.....
      Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I hope all of you are having a wonderful, healthy, productive summer! My computer has been acting up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so I'm having to receive and send eMail via Web.
      Please bear with me.... also..... good news, my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and family here with me. and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII Peace Treaty by Japan and the United States on the MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It will be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories. I will be keeping in touch with our dynamic wonderful Group by Hotel Computer. Keep on posting your queries and responses...... you are ALL so generous in sharing...... and there are many of our Group that just 'lurks-in-background' that look forward to your posts with eager anticipation.
      Jewelle






      Pitt County Historical Society: http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/

      CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering information:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/

      Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
      http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst

      RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm

      Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/

      http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/

      We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
      GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir




      SPONSORED LINKS Coastal north carolina p;t state university State farm
      State tax p; t state university United states


      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

      a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.

      b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

      c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carol Singh
      Dear Rhet, Even though, like many of you, I have few memories of World War II, here is my scoop on re-enactments. For those who lived the experience, it must
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 29, 2005
        Dear Rhet,
        Even though, like many of you, I have few
        memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
        re-enactments.
        For those who lived the experience, it must be
        like going home--in a sense like a family reunion.
        People living through a tragic event form a special
        bond that others do not share. It links them for life.
        I imagine that having lived through an event like
        Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
        brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for life.
        I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
        documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they hit me
        hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been there.
        Another aspect of the experience is that I am
        sure that even today even to witnesses it must have
        some element of the surreal. The event happened in
        another time, in another place. It was worlds away
        from our America of today--our disintegrating
        families, schools, values. In addition, there is the
        shock of having survived something like that. It's
        like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself that he
        is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
        re-connecting with those who are no longer here and an
        honoring of those bonds, memories, and sacrifices.
        Except in the memories of those who were there, many
        of those men are forgotten. We have no World War II
        wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see as we
        do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names, every
        one, even if he can't put a face with those names.
        I think people want to be remembered. Once we are
        gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
        genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
        In addition, for those who were not there,
        re-enactments let them experience a significant event
        in our history. I remember those documentaries on t.v.
        when I was growing up. These were preceded by the
        announcement: "Everything is as it was then, except
        YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who survived
        it and those who read about it in history books, to
        break the time barrier and to walk where they walked.
        It becomes living history, up close and personal, and
        not just black lines crawling across the pages of a
        musty book on a dark library shelf.
        Later, Carol
        --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:

        > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
        > reinactment is important to you, but I would really
        > like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's brother)
        > in Italy during WWII so I know that those things can
        > be very important to us. How about sharing why, if
        > you don't mind. If you want to keep it private,
        > however I am sure we will all understand and just be
        > happy for you that you can be a part of something
        > special to you. Rhet
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: jewellebaker@...
        > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
        > Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
        >
        >
        > Hello Group.....
        > Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I hope
        > all of you are having a wonderful, healthy,
        > productive summer! My computer has been acting
        > up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so I'm
        > having to receive and send eMail via Web.
        > Please bear with me.... also..... good news,
        > my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and
        > family here with me.
        > and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to
        > observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII Peace
        > Treaty by Japan and the United States on the
        > MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It will
        > be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories. I
        > will be keeping in touch with our dynamic wonderful
        > Group by Hotel Computer.
        > Keep on posting your queries and
        > responses...... you are ALL so generous in
        > sharing...... and there are many of our Group that
        > just 'lurks-in-background' that look forward to your
        > posts with eager anticipation.
        > Jewelle
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Pitt County Historical Society:
        > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
        >
        > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for
        > description and ordering information:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
        >
        > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
        >
        > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
        >
        > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
        >
        >
        http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
        >
        > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical
        > Resources:
        > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
        >
        > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
        >
        > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to
        > join our dynamic group if you are interested in
        > genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
        > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
        > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS Coastal north carolina p;t state
        > university State farm
        > State tax p; t state university United
        > states
        >
        >
        >
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        > a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.
        >
        > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an
        > email to:
        > genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
        > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
        >
        >
        >
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > removed]
        >
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Evelyn Hendricks
        I very well remember World War II and the day Pearl Harbor was bombed. My family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a couple of months before. The government
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 29, 2005
          I very well remember World War II and the day Pearl Harbor was bombed. My
          family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a couple of months before. The
          government was hastily building the Army Base at Holly Ridge, just a few
          miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded the town of Jacksonville. Camp
          Lejuene had not even been named at the time. That came a few months later.
          We were standing in line waiting for our turn to buy a ticket to the only
          movie theatre in the county. The Marines were the majority of people in the
          line. They were seeking a little entertainment in the little village which
          had little to offer at that time. A marine in front of me was smoking. When
          he put down his arm the hand holding the cigarette got a little to close to
          me and the cigarette burned my hand. Just briefly. Before the movie was over
          the military police was in the theatre gathering up the Marines and sending
          them back to the base. They emptied the restaurants and every other place
          they could find them. When we left the theatre the news was all over the
          streets. There was no radio reception in the town then, so we had to depend
          on word of mouth.
          Our house was near the railroad and I remember watching the trains leaving
          day after day with the "boys" headed for the front. Since I was only twelve
          at the time it did not affect me, but my mother was really upset about it.
          "Just children" I remember her saying. I know that in the back of her mind
          she was thinking of my older brother, who did get old enough to serve before
          the war was over.
          I feel that I lack the words to describe what it was actually like, but it
          is something I will never forget. Everyone pulled together to help the
          military. Housing was a major problem for those who brought their families.
          The schools were overwhelmed with the additional students. Temporary wooded
          buildings were built, which the State today would not allow to be used.
          Cracks were in the floor wide enough that we could drop a pencil through
          them--and often did on purpose. The coal burning heaters had to be stoked
          periodatically throughout the day. The building had just the outer layer of
          exterior wood and the studs. There were no interior walls over the
          studs.Buildings like this housed grades four and five in one building and
          grades six and seven in another. The first three grades were on the lower
          floor of the one school building. The high school was on the upper floor of
          that building.
          The base construction soon reached a state where they could turn to building
          schools, and that helped the strain a bit. Then they built some houses,
          especially for the officers. That helped the housing situation some what.
          Housing however remained a problem until the end of the war.
          I could go on and on but you will tire of reading it.
          Evelyn
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
          To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM
          Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


          > Dear Rhet,
          > Even though, like many of you, I have few
          > memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
          > re-enactments.
          > For those who lived the experience, it must be
          > like going home--in a sense like a family reunion.
          > People living through a tragic event form a special
          > bond that others do not share. It links them for life.
          > I imagine that having lived through an event like
          > Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
          > brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for life.
          > I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
          > documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they hit me
          > hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been there.
          > Another aspect of the experience is that I am
          > sure that even today even to witnesses it must have
          > some element of the surreal. The event happened in
          > another time, in another place. It was worlds away
          > from our America of today--our disintegrating
          > families, schools, values. In addition, there is the
          > shock of having survived something like that. It's
          > like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself that he
          > is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
          > re-connecting with those who are no longer here and an
          > honoring of those bonds, memories, and sacrifices.
          > Except in the memories of those who were there, many
          > of those men are forgotten. We have no World War II
          > wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see as we
          > do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names, every
          > one, even if he can't put a face with those names.
          > I think people want to be remembered. Once we are
          > gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
          > genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
          > In addition, for those who were not there,
          > re-enactments let them experience a significant event
          > in our history. I remember those documentaries on t.v.
          > when I was growing up. These were preceded by the
          > announcement: "Everything is as it was then, except
          > YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who survived
          > it and those who read about it in history books, to
          > break the time barrier and to walk where they walked.
          > It becomes living history, up close and personal, and
          > not just black lines crawling across the pages of a
          > musty book on a dark library shelf.
          > Later, Carol
          > --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
          > > reinactment is important to you, but I would really
          > > like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's brother)
          > > in Italy during WWII so I know that those things can
          > > be very important to us. How about sharing why, if
          > > you don't mind. If you want to keep it private,
          > > however I am sure we will all understand and just be
          > > happy for you that you can be a part of something
          > > special to you. Rhet
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: jewellebaker@...
          > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
          > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
          > >
          > >
          > > Hello Group.....
          > > Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I hope
          > > all of you are having a wonderful, healthy,
          > > productive summer! My computer has been acting
          > > up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so I'm
          > > having to receive and send eMail via Web.
          > > Please bear with me.... also..... good news,
          > > my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and
          > > family here with me.
          > > and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to
          > > observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII Peace
          > > Treaty by Japan and the United States on the
          > > MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It will
          > > be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories. I
          > > will be keeping in touch with our dynamic wonderful
          > > Group by Hotel Computer.
          > > Keep on posting your queries and
          > > responses...... you are ALL so generous in
          > > sharing...... and there are many of our Group that
          > > just 'lurks-in-background' that look forward to your
          > > posts with eager anticipation.
          > > Jewelle
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Pitt County Historical Society:
          > > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
          > >
          > > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for
          > > description and ordering information:
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
          > >
          > > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
          > >
          > > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
          > >
          > > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
          > >
          > >
          > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
          > >
          > > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical
          > > Resources:
          > > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
          > >
          > > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
          > >
          > > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to
          > > join our dynamic group if you are interested in
          > > genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
          > > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
          > > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > SPONSORED LINKS Coastal north carolina p;t state
          > > university State farm
          > > State tax p; t state university United
          > > states
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
          ----
          > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          > >
          > > a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.
          > >
          > > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an
          > > email to:
          > > genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
          > > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
          ----
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
          > > removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          > http://mail.yahoo.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Pitt County Historical Society:
          http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
          >
          > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
          information:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
          >
          > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
          > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
          >
          > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
          http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
          >
          > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
          http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
          >
          > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
          >
          > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
          if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
          Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
          > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Rhet Wilkinson
          Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings. Rhet ... From: Carol Singh To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM Subject: Re:
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 29, 2005
            Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings. Rhet
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Carol Singh
            To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM
            Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


            Dear Rhet,
            Even though, like many of you, I have few
            memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
            re-enactments.
            For those who lived the experience, it must be
            like going home--in a sense like a family reunion.
            People living through a tragic event form a special
            bond that others do not share. It links them for life.
            I imagine that having lived through an event like
            Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
            brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for life.
            I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
            documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they hit me
            hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been there.
            Another aspect of the experience is that I am
            sure that even today even to witnesses it must have
            some element of the surreal. The event happened in
            another time, in another place. It was worlds away
            from our America of today--our disintegrating
            families, schools, values. In addition, there is the
            shock of having survived something like that. It's
            like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself that he
            is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
            re-connecting with those who are no longer here and an
            honoring of those bonds, memories, and sacrifices.
            Except in the memories of those who were there, many
            of those men are forgotten. We have no World War II
            wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see as we
            do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names, every
            one, even if he can't put a face with those names.
            I think people want to be remembered. Once we are
            gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
            genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
            In addition, for those who were not there,
            re-enactments let them experience a significant event
            in our history. I remember those documentaries on t.v.
            when I was growing up. These were preceded by the
            announcement: "Everything is as it was then, except
            YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who survived
            it and those who read about it in history books, to
            break the time barrier and to walk where they walked.
            It becomes living history, up close and personal, and
            not just black lines crawling across the pages of a
            musty book on a dark library shelf.
            Later, Carol
            --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:

            > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
            > reinactment is important to you, but I would really
            > like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's brother)
            > in Italy during WWII so I know that those things can
            > be very important to us. How about sharing why, if
            > you don't mind. If you want to keep it private,
            > however I am sure we will all understand and just be
            > happy for you that you can be a part of something
            > special to you. Rhet
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: jewellebaker@...
            > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
            > Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
            >
            >
            > Hello Group.....
            > Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I hope
            > all of you are having a wonderful, healthy,
            > productive summer! My computer has been acting
            > up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so I'm
            > having to receive and send eMail via Web.
            > Please bear with me.... also..... good news,
            > my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and
            > family here with me.
            > and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to
            > observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII Peace
            > Treaty by Japan and the United States on the
            > MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It will
            > be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories. I
            > will be keeping in touch with our dynamic wonderful
            > Group by Hotel Computer.
            > Keep on posting your queries and
            > responses...... you are ALL so generous in
            > sharing...... and there are many of our Group that
            > just 'lurks-in-background' that look forward to your
            > posts with eager anticipation.
            > Jewelle
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Pitt County Historical Society:
            > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
            >
            > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for
            > description and ordering information:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
            >
            > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
            >
            > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
            >
            > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
            >
            >
            http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
            >
            > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical
            > Resources:
            > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
            >
            > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
            >
            > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to
            > join our dynamic group if you are interested in
            > genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
            > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
            > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > SPONSORED LINKS Coastal north carolina p;t state
            > university State farm
            > State tax p; t state university United
            > states
            >
            >
            >
            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
            > a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.
            >
            > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an
            > email to:
            > genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
            > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            >
            >
            >
            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            >
            >


            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com


            Pitt County Historical Society: http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/

            CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering information:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/

            Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
            http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst

            RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm

            Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/

            http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/

            We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
            GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir




            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

            a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.

            b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Rhet Wilkinson
            I don t remember the beginning of the war, but I remember my uncle (who died in the war) coming home in his uniform before being sent overseas and sitting on
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 29, 2005
              I don't remember the beginning of the war, but I remember my uncle (who died in the war) coming home in his uniform before being sent overseas and sitting on the sofa reading a ferrie tale to me from my favorite book. He had only the afternoon before having to go back to base. We lived in Union, SC which is about 30 miles from Spartenburg, where Camp Croft was and on Sundays the soldiers that had leave from there would take a bus to Union, just to see what was happening in the world outside of Spartenburg and to do something different. My grandfather (I lived with my grandparents then) would ride down town after church and pick up any soldiers walking up and down Main Street and bring them home with him for Sunday dinner. After my mother married my step-father who was stationed at Camp Croft we moved into base housing at Camp Croft Court. I do remember the end of the war when everyone was so excited about the news that came over the radio and how sad my mother was over that fact that her brother wouldn't be coming home. I also remember my grandfather being an air raid warden and when they would have a drill (the fire whistle would blow a certain signal) he would go out and walk up and down our street making sure that the dark shades were down in all the houses on our street so that no light showed for any possible enemy planes to have a target on the grown. Rhet
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Evelyn Hendricks
              To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 11:21 AM
              Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


              I very well remember World War II and the day Pearl Harbor was bombed. My
              family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a couple of months before. The
              government was hastily building the Army Base at Holly Ridge, just a few
              miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded the town of Jacksonville. Camp
              Lejuene had not even been named at the time. That came a few months later.
              We were standing in line waiting for our turn to buy a ticket to the only
              movie theatre in the county. The Marines were the majority of people in the
              line. They were seeking a little entertainment in the little village which
              had little to offer at that time. A marine in front of me was smoking. When
              he put down his arm the hand holding the cigarette got a little to close to
              me and the cigarette burned my hand. Just briefly. Before the movie was over
              the military police was in the theatre gathering up the Marines and sending
              them back to the base. They emptied the restaurants and every other place
              they could find them. When we left the theatre the news was all over the
              streets. There was no radio reception in the town then, so we had to depend
              on word of mouth.
              Our house was near the railroad and I remember watching the trains leaving
              day after day with the "boys" headed for the front. Since I was only twelve
              at the time it did not affect me, but my mother was really upset about it.
              "Just children" I remember her saying. I know that in the back of her mind
              she was thinking of my older brother, who did get old enough to serve before
              the war was over.
              I feel that I lack the words to describe what it was actually like, but it
              is something I will never forget. Everyone pulled together to help the
              military. Housing was a major problem for those who brought their families.
              The schools were overwhelmed with the additional students. Temporary wooded
              buildings were built, which the State today would not allow to be used.
              Cracks were in the floor wide enough that we could drop a pencil through
              them--and often did on purpose. The coal burning heaters had to be stoked
              periodatically throughout the day. The building had just the outer layer of
              exterior wood and the studs. There were no interior walls over the
              studs.Buildings like this housed grades four and five in one building and
              grades six and seven in another. The first three grades were on the lower
              floor of the one school building. The high school was on the upper floor of
              that building.
              The base construction soon reached a state where they could turn to building
              schools, and that helped the strain a bit. Then they built some houses,
              especially for the officers. That helped the housing situation some what.
              Housing however remained a problem until the end of the war.
              I could go on and on but you will tire of reading it.
              Evelyn
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
              To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM
              Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


              > Dear Rhet,
              > Even though, like many of you, I have few
              > memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
              > re-enactments.
              > For those who lived the experience, it must be
              > like going home--in a sense like a family reunion.
              > People living through a tragic event form a special
              > bond that others do not share. It links them for life.
              > I imagine that having lived through an event like
              > Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
              > brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for life.
              > I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
              > documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they hit me
              > hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been there.
              > Another aspect of the experience is that I am
              > sure that even today even to witnesses it must have
              > some element of the surreal. The event happened in
              > another time, in another place. It was worlds away
              > from our America of today--our disintegrating
              > families, schools, values. In addition, there is the
              > shock of having survived something like that. It's
              > like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself that he
              > is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
              > re-connecting with those who are no longer here and an
              > honoring of those bonds, memories, and sacrifices.
              > Except in the memories of those who were there, many
              > of those men are forgotten. We have no World War II
              > wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see as we
              > do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names, every
              > one, even if he can't put a face with those names.
              > I think people want to be remembered. Once we are
              > gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
              > genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
              > In addition, for those who were not there,
              > re-enactments let them experience a significant event
              > in our history. I remember those documentaries on t.v.
              > when I was growing up. These were preceded by the
              > announcement: "Everything is as it was then, except
              > YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who survived
              > it and those who read about it in history books, to
              > break the time barrier and to walk where they walked.
              > It becomes living history, up close and personal, and
              > not just black lines crawling across the pages of a
              > musty book on a dark library shelf.
              > Later, Carol
              > --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:
              >
              > > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
              > > reinactment is important to you, but I would really
              > > like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's brother)
              > > in Italy during WWII so I know that those things can
              > > be very important to us. How about sharing why, if
              > > you don't mind. If you want to keep it private,
              > > however I am sure we will all understand and just be
              > > happy for you that you can be a part of something
              > > special to you. Rhet
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: jewellebaker@...
              > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
              > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
              > >
              > >
              > > Hello Group.....
              > > Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I hope
              > > all of you are having a wonderful, healthy,
              > > productive summer! My computer has been acting
              > > up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so I'm
              > > having to receive and send eMail via Web.
              > > Please bear with me.... also..... good news,
              > > my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and
              > > family here with me.
              > > and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to
              > > observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII Peace
              > > Treaty by Japan and the United States on the
              > > MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It will
              > > be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories. I
              > > will be keeping in touch with our dynamic wonderful
              > > Group by Hotel Computer.
              > > Keep on posting your queries and
              > > responses...... you are ALL so generous in
              > > sharing...... and there are many of our Group that
              > > just 'lurks-in-background' that look forward to your
              > > posts with eager anticipation.
              > > Jewelle
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Pitt County Historical Society:
              > > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
              > >
              > > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for
              > > description and ordering information:
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
              > >
              > > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
              > >
              > > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
              > >
              > > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
              > >
              > >
              > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
              > >
              > > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical
              > > Resources:
              > > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
              > >
              > > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
              > >
              > > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to
              > > join our dynamic group if you are interested in
              > > genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
              > > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
              > > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > SPONSORED LINKS Coastal north carolina p;t state
              > > university State farm
              > > State tax p; t state university United
              > > states
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
              ----
              > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
              > >
              > > a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.
              > >
              > > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an
              > > email to:
              > > genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
              > > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
              ----
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > > removed]
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________________________
              > Do You Yahoo!?
              > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              > http://mail.yahoo.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Pitt County Historical Society:
              http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
              >
              > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
              information:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
              >
              > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
              > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
              >
              > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
              http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
              >
              > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
              http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
              >
              > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
              >
              > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
              if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
              Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
              > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >




              Pitt County Historical Society: http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/

              CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering information:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/

              Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
              http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst

              RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm

              Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/

              http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/

              We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
              GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir




              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

              a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.

              b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Carol Singh
              Dear Evelyn, I love what you had to say. It conveys perfectly how one s actually living through an experience and conveying it to others takes those who did
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 30, 2005
                Dear Evelyn,
                I love what you had to say. It conveys perfectly
                how one's actually living through an experience and
                conveying it to others takes those who did not share
                those times and gives them an insider's perspective.
                Instead of being on the outside looking in, they find
                themselves on the inside looking out.
                Not to portray myself as a "senior" citizen or as
                heaven forbid "elderly," I have vivid memories of the
                homefront myself. I grew up on County Home Road. I
                learned to identify fighter planes like a pro because
                they were always flying overhead. Many of my kin were
                stationed at Camp LeJeune before heading overseas. In
                the evenings Mama and Uncle Mark talked in low voices
                about who had just been sent and who was likely to be
                "called up."
                I am so glad you shared the story of Camp
                LeJeune. I had always wanted to know when it came into
                being. I have long been curious about its name, too.
                "Le jeune" in French means "The Young" or as we would
                probably say, "Young People."
                I can imagine that your mother's heart was in her
                throat when your brother was called into service. I
                remember my own brother in Viet Nam. Mama, already ill
                with the effects of treatment for her cancer, really
                did not need the added strain. All her life she had
                kept us safe, yet now she had to let one of us go and
                that without the benefit of her protection and
                counsel.
                As for World War II, I experienced the black
                outs, the rations, the patriotism. The home front was
                merely an extension of the battlefield. There soldiers
                were risking their lives for us. The least we could do
                was to provide well for them, gladly and without
                complaint.
                Perhaps the most interesting thing that happened
                to me was awakening one bright, summer morning in my
                bed with the window open protected only by the screen.
                It was not a modern, cubbyhole of a window, but those
                old-fashioned full-length windows that a grown person
                could easily climb out of. I was idly enjoying the
                clear, blue sky and listening to bird song and bees
                buzzing when suddenly there came the roar of a fighter
                plane.
                A flash of shadow over my screen, and the plane
                zoomed past almost in reach of my hand if there had
                been no screen. My impulse was to scream, but there
                was not time. The next thing I knew I saw the plane
                touch down in the road in front of the house.
                I dressed quickly and ran outside where Mama and
                Uncle Mark and every other grown-up had run to see
                what had happened and to offer assistance.
                Fortunately, the pilot had made a completely safe
                landing, but he could not fly the plane. People parked
                their cars at distances on either side of the plane to
                block traffic until his plane was running again. This
                experience made me feel even closer to the war.
                Afterwards, of course, I never saw a plane flying
                overhead without recalling that morning when a pilot
                came calling.
                The rations had their bright side, too. We were
                no longer able to purchase white cane sugar, so Mama
                bought cake decorating sugar. There was yellow sugar,
                pink sugar, blue sugar, and green sugar. I got to
                choose the color for each meal, and I chose plates and
                napkins to complement the color of the sugar. I
                enjoyed waiting for Mama to come back from grocery
                shopping to see what colors the sugar would be. That
                was the greatest thing about the war. It brought new
                color into my life.
                After the war, meal planning was never the same
                with the return of the white sugar. Fortunately, our
                kin made it home. Several uncles were medics and
                related their experiences. I was all ears and full of
                questions. They answered and explained things to me
                the same as if I were any grown-up friend. As a
                result, I grew up thinking of them as my big brothers
                instead of uncles. Their experiences really brought us
                closer together. Later, Carol

                --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:

                > I very well remember World War II and the day Pearl
                > Harbor was bombed. My
                > family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a couple
                > of months before. The
                > government was hastily building the Army Base at
                > Holly Ridge, just a few
                > miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded the
                > town of Jacksonville. Camp
                > Lejuene had not even been named at the time. That
                > came a few months later.
                > We were standing in line waiting for our turn to buy
                > a ticket to the only
                > movie theatre in the county. The Marines were the
                > majority of people in the
                > line. They were seeking a little entertainment in
                > the little village which
                > had little to offer at that time. A marine in front
                > of me was smoking. When
                > he put down his arm the hand holding the cigarette
                > got a little to close to
                > me and the cigarette burned my hand. Just briefly.
                > Before the movie was over
                > the military police was in the theatre gathering up
                > the Marines and sending
                > them back to the base. They emptied the restaurants
                > and every other place
                > they could find them. When we left the theatre the
                > news was all over the
                > streets. There was no radio reception in the town
                > then, so we had to depend
                > on word of mouth.
                > Our house was near the railroad and I remember
                > watching the trains leaving
                > day after day with the "boys" headed for the front.
                > Since I was only twelve
                > at the time it did not affect me, but my mother was
                > really upset about it.
                > "Just children" I remember her saying. I know that
                > in the back of her mind
                > she was thinking of my older brother, who did get
                > old enough to serve before
                > the war was over.
                > I feel that I lack the words to describe what it was
                > actually like, but it
                > is something I will never forget. Everyone pulled
                > together to help the
                > military. Housing was a major problem for those who
                > brought their families.
                > The schools were overwhelmed with the additional
                > students. Temporary wooded
                > buildings were built, which the State today would
                > not allow to be used.
                > Cracks were in the floor wide enough that we could
                > drop a pencil through
                > them--and often did on purpose. The coal burning
                > heaters had to be stoked
                > periodatically throughout the day. The building had
                > just the outer layer of
                > exterior wood and the studs. There were no interior
                > walls over the
                > studs.Buildings like this housed grades four and
                > five in one building and
                > grades six and seven in another. The first three
                > grades were on the lower
                > floor of the one school building. The high school
                > was on the upper floor of
                > that building.
                > The base construction soon reached a state where
                > they could turn to building
                > schools, and that helped the strain a bit. Then they
                > built some houses,
                > especially for the officers. That helped the housing
                > situation some what.
                > Housing however remained a problem until the end of
                > the war.
                > I could go on and on but you will tire of reading
                > it.
                > Evelyn
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM
                > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                >
                >
                > > Dear Rhet,
                > > Even though, like many of you, I have few
                > > memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
                > > re-enactments.
                > > For those who lived the experience, it must
                > be
                > > like going home--in a sense like a family reunion.
                > > People living through a tragic event form a
                > special
                > > bond that others do not share. It links them for
                > life.
                > > I imagine that having lived through an event like
                > > Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
                > > brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for
                > life.
                > > I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
                > > documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they
                > hit me
                > > hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been
                > there.
                > > Another aspect of the experience is that I am
                > > sure that even today even to witnesses it must
                > have
                > > some element of the surreal. The event happened in
                > > another time, in another place. It was worlds away
                > > from our America of today--our disintegrating
                > > families, schools, values. In addition, there is
                > the
                > > shock of having survived something like that. It's
                > > like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself
                > that he
                > > is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
                > > re-connecting with those who are no longer here
                > and an
                > > honoring of those bonds, memories, and sacrifices.
                > > Except in the memories of those who were there,
                > many
                > > of those men are forgotten. We have no World War
                > II
                > > wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see
                > as we
                > > do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names,
                > every
                > > one, even if he can't put a face with those names.
                > > I think people want to be remembered. Once we
                > are
                > > gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
                > > genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
                > > In addition, for those who were not there,
                > > re-enactments let them experience a significant
                > event
                > > in our history. I remember those documentaries on
                > t.v.
                > > when I was growing up. These were preceded by the
                > > announcement: "Everything is as it was then,
                > except
                > > YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who
                > survived
                > > it and those who read about it in history books,
                > to
                > > break the time barrier and to walk where they
                > walked.
                > > It becomes living history, up close and personal,
                > and
                > > not just black lines crawling across the pages of
                > a
                > > musty book on a dark library shelf.
                > > Later, Carol
                > > --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
                > > > reinactment is important to you, but I would
                > really
                > > > like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's
                > brother)
                > > > in Italy during WWII so I know that those things
                > can
                > > > be very important to us. How about sharing why,
                > if
                > > > you don't mind. If you want to keep it private,
                > > > however I am sure we will all understand and
                > just be
                > > > happy for you that you can be a part of
                > something
                > > > special to you. Rhet
                > > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > > From: jewellebaker@...
                > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
                > > > Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
                > > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Hello Group.....
                > > > Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I
                > hope
                > > > all of you are having a wonderful, healthy,
                > > > productive summer! My computer has been
                > acting
                > > > up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so
                > I'm
                > > > having to receive and send eMail via Web.
                > > > Please bear with me.... also..... good
                > news,
                > > > my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and
                > > > family here with me.
                > > > and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to
                > > > observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII
                > Peace
                > > > Treaty by Japan and the United States on the
                > > > MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It
                > will
                > > > be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories.
                > I
                > > > will be keeping in touch with our dynamic
                > wonderful
                > > > Group by Hotel Computer.
                >
                === message truncated ===


                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                http://mail.yahoo.com
              • Carol Singh
                Dear Rhet, I wasn t even born when the war began. However, I remember the black outs as they were called around Greenville. With those nearly 6-feet tall
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 30, 2005
                  Dear Rhet,
                  I wasn't even born when the war began. However, I
                  remember the black outs as they were called around
                  Greenville. With those nearly 6-feet tall windows,
                  blacking out was no picnic. Mama and Uncle Mark
                  purchased full length window shades, which they
                  painted black on the outside. These they placed in
                  every window--12 of them. Mama was very strict about
                  when we had to be inside--by twilight--and about
                  lighting. We used only an oil lamp in the kitchen and
                  candles in each bedroom. To go from the house--the
                  bedroom and living room area--to the kitchen and
                  dining room portion of the house, we had to cross
                  about 14ft of open porch. We crossed in darkness--one
                  trip for us children. Once we left the kitchen for the
                  "house," we did not travel back again that night.
                  So we gathered in the kitchen and diningroom. We ate
                  and drank lots of coffee in the kitchen, and we sat
                  around the big, formal table in the diningroom
                  listening to the radio and drinking more coffee after
                  supper.
                  Since we were little, if we got sleepy, Mama
                  would "cart us off to be" as she put it. She was never
                  too busy or too tired to have individual prayers with
                  us at bedtime and to ask God to bless us. We grew up
                  with the assurance that no matter what happened in
                  this life, we were loved. It never crossed my mind
                  that everybody did not grow up in a home like mine.
                  That says a great deal about just how lucky I was.
                  Later, Carol

                  --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:

                  > I don't remember the beginning of the war, but I
                  > remember my uncle (who died in the war) coming home
                  > in his uniform before being sent overseas and
                  > sitting on the sofa reading a ferrie tale to me from
                  > my favorite book. He had only the afternoon before
                  > having to go back to base. We lived in Union, SC
                  > which is about 30 miles from Spartenburg, where Camp
                  > Croft was and on Sundays the soldiers that had leave
                  > from there would take a bus to Union, just to see
                  > what was happening in the world outside of
                  > Spartenburg and to do something different. My
                  > grandfather (I lived with my grandparents then)
                  > would ride down town after church and pick up any
                  > soldiers walking up and down Main Street and bring
                  > them home with him for Sunday dinner. After my
                  > mother married my step-father who was stationed at
                  > Camp Croft we moved into base housing at Camp Croft
                  > Court. I do remember the end of the war when
                  > everyone was so excited about the news that came
                  > over the radio and how sad my mother was over that
                  > fact that her brother wouldn't be coming home. I
                  > also remember my grandfather being an air raid
                  > warden and when they would have a drill (the fire
                  > whistle would blow a certain signal) he would go out
                  > and walk up and down our street making sure that the
                  > dark shades were down in all the houses on our
                  > street so that no light showed for any possible
                  > enemy planes to have a target on the grown. Rhet
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Evelyn Hendricks
                  > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 11:21 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                  >
                  >
                  > I very well remember World War II and the day
                  > Pearl Harbor was bombed. My
                  > family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a couple
                  > of months before. The
                  > government was hastily building the Army Base at
                  > Holly Ridge, just a few
                  > miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded the
                  > town of Jacksonville. Camp
                  > Lejuene had not even been named at the time. That
                  > came a few months later.
                  > We were standing in line waiting for our turn to
                  > buy a ticket to the only
                  > movie theatre in the county. The Marines were the
                  > majority of people in the
                  > line. They were seeking a little entertainment in
                  > the little village which
                  > had little to offer at that time. A marine in
                  > front of me was smoking. When
                  > he put down his arm the hand holding the cigarette
                  > got a little to close to
                  > me and the cigarette burned my hand. Just briefly.
                  > Before the movie was over
                  > the military police was in the theatre gathering
                  > up the Marines and sending
                  > them back to the base. They emptied the
                  > restaurants and every other place
                  > they could find them. When we left the theatre the
                  > news was all over the
                  > streets. There was no radio reception in the town
                  > then, so we had to depend
                  > on word of mouth.
                  > Our house was near the railroad and I remember
                  > watching the trains leaving
                  > day after day with the "boys" headed for the
                  > front. Since I was only twelve
                  > at the time it did not affect me, but my mother
                  > was really upset about it.
                  > "Just children" I remember her saying. I know that
                  > in the back of her mind
                  > she was thinking of my older brother, who did get
                  > old enough to serve before
                  > the war was over.
                  > I feel that I lack the words to describe what it
                  > was actually like, but it
                  > is something I will never forget. Everyone pulled
                  > together to help the
                  > military. Housing was a major problem for those
                  > who brought their families.
                  > The schools were overwhelmed with the additional
                  > students. Temporary wooded
                  > buildings were built, which the State today would
                  > not allow to be used.
                  > Cracks were in the floor wide enough that we could
                  > drop a pencil through
                  > them--and often did on purpose. The coal burning
                  > heaters had to be stoked
                  > periodatically throughout the day. The building
                  > had just the outer layer of
                  > exterior wood and the studs. There were no
                  > interior walls over the
                  > studs.Buildings like this housed grades four and
                  > five in one building and
                  > grades six and seven in another. The first three
                  > grades were on the lower
                  > floor of the one school building. The high school
                  > was on the upper floor of
                  > that building.
                  > The base construction soon reached a state where
                  > they could turn to building
                  > schools, and that helped the strain a bit. Then
                  > they built some houses,
                  > especially for the officers. That helped the
                  > housing situation some what.
                  > Housing however remained a problem until the end
                  > of the war.
                  > I could go on and on but you will tire of reading
                  > it.
                  > Evelyn
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                  > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                  >
                  >
                  > > Dear Rhet,
                  > > Even though, like many of you, I have few
                  > > memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
                  > > re-enactments.
                  > > For those who lived the experience, it must
                  > be
                  > > like going home--in a sense like a family
                  > reunion.
                  > > People living through a tragic event form a
                  > special
                  > > bond that others do not share. It links them for
                  > life.
                  > > I imagine that having lived through an event
                  > like
                  > > Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
                  > > brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for
                  > life.
                  > > I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
                  > > documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they
                  > hit me
                  > > hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been
                  > there.
                  > > Another aspect of the experience is that I
                  > am
                  > > sure that even today even to witnesses it must
                  > have
                  > > some element of the surreal. The event happened
                  > in
                  > > another time, in another place. It was worlds
                  > away
                  > > from our America of today--our disintegrating
                  > > families, schools, values. In addition, there is
                  > the
                  > > shock of having survived something like that.
                  > It's
                  > > like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself
                  > that he
                  > > is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
                  > > re-connecting with those who are no longer here
                  > and an
                  > > honoring of those bonds, memories, and
                  > sacrifices.
                  > > Except in the memories of those who were there,
                  > many
                  > > of those men are forgotten. We have no World War
                  > II
                  > > wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see
                  > as we
                  > > do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names,
                  > every
                  > > one, even if he can't put a face with those
                  > names.
                  > > I think people want to be remembered. Once
                  > we are
                  > > gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
                  > > genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
                  > > In addition, for those who were not there,
                  > > re-enactments let them experience a significant
                  > event
                  > > in our history. I remember those documentaries
                  > on t.v.
                  > > when I was growing up. These were preceded by
                  > the
                  > > announcement: "Everything is as it was then,
                  > except
                  > > YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who
                  > survived
                  > > it and those who read about it in history books,
                  > to
                  > > break the time barrier and to walk where they
                  > walked.
                  > > It becomes living history, up close and
                  > personal, and
                  > > not just black lines crawling across the pages
                  > of a
                  > > musty book on a dark library shelf.
                  > > Later, Carol
                  > > --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
                  > > > reinactment is important to you, but I would
                  > really
                  >
                  === message truncated ===


                  __________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  http://mail.yahoo.com
                • Evelyn Hendricks
                  Camp Lejuene received its name from a French general, I believe. I was only twelve at the time, but it seems I remember something about it. Some people thought
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 30, 2005
                    Camp Lejuene received its name from a French general, I believe. I was only
                    twelve at the time, but it seems I remember something about it. Some people
                    thought some others should have received the honor.
                    I think I will start writing down some of these things. So far as I know my
                    children are not interested, although I see a few signs of interest in the
                    oldest one. He is my step-son and he is fifty eight now. Of my other two,
                    one is fifty and the other is forty-nine. The step-son is the only married
                    one and his wife is slightly interested. Maybe if I wrote down some things
                    it would spur her on.
                    I enjoy sharing all the memories you write about.
                    Evelyn
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                    To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 7:57 PM
                    Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


                    > Dear Evelyn,
                    > I love what you had to say. It conveys perfectly
                    > how one's actually living through an experience and
                    > conveying it to others takes those who did not share
                    > those times and gives them an insider's perspective.
                    > Instead of being on the outside looking in, they find
                    > themselves on the inside looking out.
                    > Not to portray myself as a "senior" citizen or as
                    > heaven forbid "elderly," I have vivid memories of the
                    > homefront myself. I grew up on County Home Road. I
                    > learned to identify fighter planes like a pro because
                    > they were always flying overhead. Many of my kin were
                    > stationed at Camp LeJeune before heading overseas. In
                    > the evenings Mama and Uncle Mark talked in low voices
                    > about who had just been sent and who was likely to be
                    > "called up."
                    > I am so glad you shared the story of Camp
                    > LeJeune. I had always wanted to know when it came into
                    > being. I have long been curious about its name, too.
                    > "Le jeune" in French means "The Young" or as we would
                    > probably say, "Young People."
                    > I can imagine that your mother's heart was in her
                    > throat when your brother was called into service. I
                    > remember my own brother in Viet Nam. Mama, already ill
                    > with the effects of treatment for her cancer, really
                    > did not need the added strain. All her life she had
                    > kept us safe, yet now she had to let one of us go and
                    > that without the benefit of her protection and
                    > counsel.
                    > As for World War II, I experienced the black
                    > outs, the rations, the patriotism. The home front was
                    > merely an extension of the battlefield. There soldiers
                    > were risking their lives for us. The least we could do
                    > was to provide well for them, gladly and without
                    > complaint.
                    > Perhaps the most interesting thing that happened
                    > to me was awakening one bright, summer morning in my
                    > bed with the window open protected only by the screen.
                    > It was not a modern, cubbyhole of a window, but those
                    > old-fashioned full-length windows that a grown person
                    > could easily climb out of. I was idly enjoying the
                    > clear, blue sky and listening to bird song and bees
                    > buzzing when suddenly there came the roar of a fighter
                    > plane.
                    > A flash of shadow over my screen, and the plane
                    > zoomed past almost in reach of my hand if there had
                    > been no screen. My impulse was to scream, but there
                    > was not time. The next thing I knew I saw the plane
                    > touch down in the road in front of the house.
                    > I dressed quickly and ran outside where Mama and
                    > Uncle Mark and every other grown-up had run to see
                    > what had happened and to offer assistance.
                    > Fortunately, the pilot had made a completely safe
                    > landing, but he could not fly the plane. People parked
                    > their cars at distances on either side of the plane to
                    > block traffic until his plane was running again. This
                    > experience made me feel even closer to the war.
                    > Afterwards, of course, I never saw a plane flying
                    > overhead without recalling that morning when a pilot
                    > came calling.
                    > The rations had their bright side, too. We were
                    > no longer able to purchase white cane sugar, so Mama
                    > bought cake decorating sugar. There was yellow sugar,
                    > pink sugar, blue sugar, and green sugar. I got to
                    > choose the color for each meal, and I chose plates and
                    > napkins to complement the color of the sugar. I
                    > enjoyed waiting for Mama to come back from grocery
                    > shopping to see what colors the sugar would be. That
                    > was the greatest thing about the war. It brought new
                    > color into my life.
                    > After the war, meal planning was never the same
                    > with the return of the white sugar. Fortunately, our
                    > kin made it home. Several uncles were medics and
                    > related their experiences. I was all ears and full of
                    > questions. They answered and explained things to me
                    > the same as if I were any grown-up friend. As a
                    > result, I grew up thinking of them as my big brothers
                    > instead of uncles. Their experiences really brought us
                    > closer together. Later, Carol
                    >
                    > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > I very well remember World War II and the day Pearl
                    > > Harbor was bombed. My
                    > > family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a couple
                    > > of months before. The
                    > > government was hastily building the Army Base at
                    > > Holly Ridge, just a few
                    > > miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded the
                    > > town of Jacksonville. Camp
                    > > Lejuene had not even been named at the time. That
                    > > came a few months later.
                    > > We were standing in line waiting for our turn to buy
                    > > a ticket to the only
                    > > movie theatre in the county. The Marines were the
                    > > majority of people in the
                    > > line. They were seeking a little entertainment in
                    > > the little village which
                    > > had little to offer at that time. A marine in front
                    > > of me was smoking. When
                    > > he put down his arm the hand holding the cigarette
                    > > got a little to close to
                    > > me and the cigarette burned my hand. Just briefly.
                    > > Before the movie was over
                    > > the military police was in the theatre gathering up
                    > > the Marines and sending
                    > > them back to the base. They emptied the restaurants
                    > > and every other place
                    > > they could find them. When we left the theatre the
                    > > news was all over the
                    > > streets. There was no radio reception in the town
                    > > then, so we had to depend
                    > > on word of mouth.
                    > > Our house was near the railroad and I remember
                    > > watching the trains leaving
                    > > day after day with the "boys" headed for the front.
                    > > Since I was only twelve
                    > > at the time it did not affect me, but my mother was
                    > > really upset about it.
                    > > "Just children" I remember her saying. I know that
                    > > in the back of her mind
                    > > she was thinking of my older brother, who did get
                    > > old enough to serve before
                    > > the war was over.
                    > > I feel that I lack the words to describe what it was
                    > > actually like, but it
                    > > is something I will never forget. Everyone pulled
                    > > together to help the
                    > > military. Housing was a major problem for those who
                    > > brought their families.
                    > > The schools were overwhelmed with the additional
                    > > students. Temporary wooded
                    > > buildings were built, which the State today would
                    > > not allow to be used.
                    > > Cracks were in the floor wide enough that we could
                    > > drop a pencil through
                    > > them--and often did on purpose. The coal burning
                    > > heaters had to be stoked
                    > > periodatically throughout the day. The building had
                    > > just the outer layer of
                    > > exterior wood and the studs. There were no interior
                    > > walls over the
                    > > studs.Buildings like this housed grades four and
                    > > five in one building and
                    > > grades six and seven in another. The first three
                    > > grades were on the lower
                    > > floor of the one school building. The high school
                    > > was on the upper floor of
                    > > that building.
                    > > The base construction soon reached a state where
                    > > they could turn to building
                    > > schools, and that helped the strain a bit. Then they
                    > > built some houses,
                    > > especially for the officers. That helped the housing
                    > > situation some what.
                    > > Housing however remained a problem until the end of
                    > > the war.
                    > > I could go on and on but you will tire of reading
                    > > it.
                    > > Evelyn
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                    > > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                    > > Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM
                    > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > > Dear Rhet,
                    > > > Even though, like many of you, I have few
                    > > > memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
                    > > > re-enactments.
                    > > > For those who lived the experience, it must
                    > > be
                    > > > like going home--in a sense like a family reunion.
                    > > > People living through a tragic event form a
                    > > special
                    > > > bond that others do not share. It links them for
                    > > life.
                    > > > I imagine that having lived through an event like
                    > > > Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
                    > > > brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for
                    > > life.
                    > > > I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
                    > > > documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they
                    > > hit me
                    > > > hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been
                    > > there.
                    > > > Another aspect of the experience is that I am
                    > > > sure that even today even to witnesses it must
                    > > have
                    > > > some element of the surreal. The event happened in
                    > > > another time, in another place. It was worlds away
                    > > > from our America of today--our disintegrating
                    > > > families, schools, values. In addition, there is
                    > > the
                    > > > shock of having survived something like that. It's
                    > > > like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself
                    > > that he
                    > > > is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
                    > > > re-connecting with those who are no longer here
                    > > and an
                    > > > honoring of those bonds, memories, and sacrifices.
                    > > > Except in the memories of those who were there,
                    > > many
                    > > > of those men are forgotten. We have no World War
                    > > II
                    > > > wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see
                    > > as we
                    > > > do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names,
                    > > every
                    > > > one, even if he can't put a face with those names.
                    > > > I think people want to be remembered. Once we
                    > > are
                    > > > gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
                    > > > genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
                    > > > In addition, for those who were not there,
                    > > > re-enactments let them experience a significant
                    > > event
                    > > > in our history. I remember those documentaries on
                    > > t.v.
                    > > > when I was growing up. These were preceded by the
                    > > > announcement: "Everything is as it was then,
                    > > except
                    > > > YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who
                    > > survived
                    > > > it and those who read about it in history books,
                    > > to
                    > > > break the time barrier and to walk where they
                    > > walked.
                    > > > It becomes living history, up close and personal,
                    > > and
                    > > > not just black lines crawling across the pages of
                    > > a
                    > > > musty book on a dark library shelf.
                    > > > Later, Carol
                    > > > --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
                    > > > > reinactment is important to you, but I would
                    > > really
                    > > > > like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's
                    > > brother)
                    > > > > in Italy during WWII so I know that those things
                    > > can
                    > > > > be very important to us. How about sharing why,
                    > > if
                    > > > > you don't mind. If you want to keep it private,
                    > > > > however I am sure we will all understand and
                    > > just be
                    > > > > happy for you that you can be a part of
                    > > something
                    > > > > special to you. Rhet
                    > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > > > From: jewellebaker@...
                    > > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
                    > > > > Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
                    > > > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Hello Group.....
                    > > > > Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I
                    > > hope
                    > > > > all of you are having a wonderful, healthy,
                    > > > > productive summer! My computer has been
                    > > acting
                    > > > > up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so
                    > > I'm
                    > > > > having to receive and send eMail via Web.
                    > > > > Please bear with me.... also..... good
                    > > news,
                    > > > > my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and
                    > > > > family here with me.
                    > > > > and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to
                    > > > > observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII
                    > > Peace
                    > > > > Treaty by Japan and the United States on the
                    > > > > MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It
                    > > will
                    > > > > be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories.
                    > > I
                    > > > > will be keeping in touch with our dynamic
                    > > wonderful
                    > > > > Group by Hotel Computer.
                    > >
                    > === message truncated ===
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________________________
                    > Do You Yahoo!?
                    > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                    > http://mail.yahoo.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Pitt County Historical Society:
                    http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
                    >
                    > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
                    information:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
                    >
                    > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
                    > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
                    >
                    > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
                    http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
                    >
                    > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
                    http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
                    >
                    > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
                    >
                    > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
                    if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
                    Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
                    > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Rhet Wilkinson
                    Because they aren t interested now doesn t mean they won t be in years to come and it may be after you aren t here to tell them any more. If you have written
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 31, 2005
                      Because they aren't interested now doesn't mean they won't be in years to come and it may be after you aren't here to tell them any more. If you have written them down that will still be here for them to refer to. I had planned to sit down with my grandmother and record the things she was telling me about growing up in Georgia. I was going to do it as soon as I finished getting my masters (while I was teaching during the day and going to school at night) She died a week before I completed my education and I lost the chance. So go ahead and write those things down. One day they will thank you even if you aren't still around to hear them. Rhet
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Evelyn Hendricks
                      To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 8:31 PM
                      Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


                      Camp Lejuene received its name from a French general, I believe. I was only
                      twelve at the time, but it seems I remember something about it. Some people
                      thought some others should have received the honor.
                      I think I will start writing down some of these things. So far as I know my
                      children are not interested, although I see a few signs of interest in the
                      oldest one. He is my step-son and he is fifty eight now. Of my other two,
                      one is fifty and the other is forty-nine. The step-son is the only married
                      one and his wife is slightly interested. Maybe if I wrote down some things
                      it would spur her on.
                      I enjoy sharing all the memories you write about.
                      Evelyn
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                      To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 7:57 PM
                      Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base


                      > Dear Evelyn,
                      > I love what you had to say. It conveys perfectly
                      > how one's actually living through an experience and
                      > conveying it to others takes those who did not share
                      > those times and gives them an insider's perspective.
                      > Instead of being on the outside looking in, they find
                      > themselves on the inside looking out.
                      > Not to portray myself as a "senior" citizen or as
                      > heaven forbid "elderly," I have vivid memories of the
                      > homefront myself. I grew up on County Home Road. I
                      > learned to identify fighter planes like a pro because
                      > they were always flying overhead. Many of my kin were
                      > stationed at Camp LeJeune before heading overseas. In
                      > the evenings Mama and Uncle Mark talked in low voices
                      > about who had just been sent and who was likely to be
                      > "called up."
                      > I am so glad you shared the story of Camp
                      > LeJeune. I had always wanted to know when it came into
                      > being. I have long been curious about its name, too.
                      > "Le jeune" in French means "The Young" or as we would
                      > probably say, "Young People."
                      > I can imagine that your mother's heart was in her
                      > throat when your brother was called into service. I
                      > remember my own brother in Viet Nam. Mama, already ill
                      > with the effects of treatment for her cancer, really
                      > did not need the added strain. All her life she had
                      > kept us safe, yet now she had to let one of us go and
                      > that without the benefit of her protection and
                      > counsel.
                      > As for World War II, I experienced the black
                      > outs, the rations, the patriotism. The home front was
                      > merely an extension of the battlefield. There soldiers
                      > were risking their lives for us. The least we could do
                      > was to provide well for them, gladly and without
                      > complaint.
                      > Perhaps the most interesting thing that happened
                      > to me was awakening one bright, summer morning in my
                      > bed with the window open protected only by the screen.
                      > It was not a modern, cubbyhole of a window, but those
                      > old-fashioned full-length windows that a grown person
                      > could easily climb out of. I was idly enjoying the
                      > clear, blue sky and listening to bird song and bees
                      > buzzing when suddenly there came the roar of a fighter
                      > plane.
                      > A flash of shadow over my screen, and the plane
                      > zoomed past almost in reach of my hand if there had
                      > been no screen. My impulse was to scream, but there
                      > was not time. The next thing I knew I saw the plane
                      > touch down in the road in front of the house.
                      > I dressed quickly and ran outside where Mama and
                      > Uncle Mark and every other grown-up had run to see
                      > what had happened and to offer assistance.
                      > Fortunately, the pilot had made a completely safe
                      > landing, but he could not fly the plane. People parked
                      > their cars at distances on either side of the plane to
                      > block traffic until his plane was running again. This
                      > experience made me feel even closer to the war.
                      > Afterwards, of course, I never saw a plane flying
                      > overhead without recalling that morning when a pilot
                      > came calling.
                      > The rations had their bright side, too. We were
                      > no longer able to purchase white cane sugar, so Mama
                      > bought cake decorating sugar. There was yellow sugar,
                      > pink sugar, blue sugar, and green sugar. I got to
                      > choose the color for each meal, and I chose plates and
                      > napkins to complement the color of the sugar. I
                      > enjoyed waiting for Mama to come back from grocery
                      > shopping to see what colors the sugar would be. That
                      > was the greatest thing about the war. It brought new
                      > color into my life.
                      > After the war, meal planning was never the same
                      > with the return of the white sugar. Fortunately, our
                      > kin made it home. Several uncles were medics and
                      > related their experiences. I was all ears and full of
                      > questions. They answered and explained things to me
                      > the same as if I were any grown-up friend. As a
                      > result, I grew up thinking of them as my big brothers
                      > instead of uncles. Their experiences really brought us
                      > closer together. Later, Carol
                      >
                      > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > I very well remember World War II and the day Pearl
                      > > Harbor was bombed. My
                      > > family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a couple
                      > > of months before. The
                      > > government was hastily building the Army Base at
                      > > Holly Ridge, just a few
                      > > miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded the
                      > > town of Jacksonville. Camp
                      > > Lejuene had not even been named at the time. That
                      > > came a few months later.
                      > > We were standing in line waiting for our turn to buy
                      > > a ticket to the only
                      > > movie theatre in the county. The Marines were the
                      > > majority of people in the
                      > > line. They were seeking a little entertainment in
                      > > the little village which
                      > > had little to offer at that time. A marine in front
                      > > of me was smoking. When
                      > > he put down his arm the hand holding the cigarette
                      > > got a little to close to
                      > > me and the cigarette burned my hand. Just briefly.
                      > > Before the movie was over
                      > > the military police was in the theatre gathering up
                      > > the Marines and sending
                      > > them back to the base. They emptied the restaurants
                      > > and every other place
                      > > they could find them. When we left the theatre the
                      > > news was all over the
                      > > streets. There was no radio reception in the town
                      > > then, so we had to depend
                      > > on word of mouth.
                      > > Our house was near the railroad and I remember
                      > > watching the trains leaving
                      > > day after day with the "boys" headed for the front.
                      > > Since I was only twelve
                      > > at the time it did not affect me, but my mother was
                      > > really upset about it.
                      > > "Just children" I remember her saying. I know that
                      > > in the back of her mind
                      > > she was thinking of my older brother, who did get
                      > > old enough to serve before
                      > > the war was over.
                      > > I feel that I lack the words to describe what it was
                      > > actually like, but it
                      > > is something I will never forget. Everyone pulled
                      > > together to help the
                      > > military. Housing was a major problem for those who
                      > > brought their families.
                      > > The schools were overwhelmed with the additional
                      > > students. Temporary wooded
                      > > buildings were built, which the State today would
                      > > not allow to be used.
                      > > Cracks were in the floor wide enough that we could
                      > > drop a pencil through
                      > > them--and often did on purpose. The coal burning
                      > > heaters had to be stoked
                      > > periodatically throughout the day. The building had
                      > > just the outer layer of
                      > > exterior wood and the studs. There were no interior
                      > > walls over the
                      > > studs.Buildings like this housed grades four and
                      > > five in one building and
                      > > grades six and seven in another. The first three
                      > > grades were on the lower
                      > > floor of the one school building. The high school
                      > > was on the upper floor of
                      > > that building.
                      > > The base construction soon reached a state where
                      > > they could turn to building
                      > > schools, and that helped the strain a bit. Then they
                      > > built some houses,
                      > > especially for the officers. That helped the housing
                      > > situation some what.
                      > > Housing however remained a problem until the end of
                      > > the war.
                      > > I could go on and on but you will tire of reading
                      > > it.
                      > > Evelyn
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                      > > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                      > > Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 8:19 AM
                      > > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > > Dear Rhet,
                      > > > Even though, like many of you, I have few
                      > > > memories of World War II, here is my scoop on
                      > > > re-enactments.
                      > > > For those who lived the experience, it must
                      > > be
                      > > > like going home--in a sense like a family reunion.
                      > > > People living through a tragic event form a
                      > > special
                      > > > bond that others do not share. It links them for
                      > > life.
                      > > > I imagine that having lived through an event like
                      > > > Pearl Harbor and having seen friends I knew like
                      > > > brothers blown to bits would have scarred me for
                      > > life.
                      > > > I have only seen the re-enactment myself through
                      > > > documentaries like those by Ken Burns, and they
                      > > hit me
                      > > > hard. Imagine the impact if I had actually been
                      > > there.
                      > > > Another aspect of the experience is that I am
                      > > > sure that even today even to witnesses it must
                      > > have
                      > > > some element of the surreal. The event happened in
                      > > > another time, in another place. It was worlds away
                      > > > from our America of today--our disintegrating
                      > > > families, schools, values. In addition, there is
                      > > the
                      > > > shock of having survived something like that. It's
                      > > > like a pinching of oneself to reassure oneself
                      > > that he
                      > > > is still here, alive and intact. It is also a
                      > > > re-connecting with those who are no longer here
                      > > and an
                      > > > honoring of those bonds, memories, and sacrifices.
                      > > > Except in the memories of those who were there,
                      > > many
                      > > > of those men are forgotten. We have no World War
                      > > II
                      > > > wall in our nation's capital for everyone to see
                      > > as we
                      > > > do for Viet Nam. There one can see those names,
                      > > every
                      > > > one, even if he can't put a face with those names.
                      > > > I think people want to be remembered. Once we
                      > > are
                      > > > gone, it's all the life we have left. It's like
                      > > > genealogy, like what we are ourselves doing.
                      > > > In addition, for those who were not there,
                      > > > re-enactments let them experience a significant
                      > > event
                      > > > in our history. I remember those documentaries on
                      > > t.v.
                      > > > when I was growing up. These were preceded by the
                      > > > announcement: "Everything is as it was then,
                      > > except
                      > > > YOU WERE THERE!" It allows us, both those who
                      > > survived
                      > > > it and those who read about it in history books,
                      > > to
                      > > > break the time barrier and to walk where they
                      > > walked.
                      > > > It becomes living history, up close and personal,
                      > > and
                      > > > not just black lines crawling across the pages of
                      > > a
                      > > > musty book on a dark library shelf.
                      > > > Later, Carol
                      > > > --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > > Maybe I have missed a pst post as to why the
                      > > > > reinactment is important to you, but I would
                      > > really
                      > > > > like to know. I lost an uncle (my mother's
                      > > brother)
                      > > > > in Italy during WWII so I know that those things
                      > > can
                      > > > > be very important to us. How about sharing why,
                      > > if
                      > > > > you don't mind. If you want to keep it private,
                      > > > > however I am sure we will all understand and
                      > > just be
                      > > > > happy for you that you can be a part of
                      > > something
                      > > > > special to you. Rhet
                      > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > > > From: jewellebaker@...
                      > > > > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
                      > > > > Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 12:20 AM
                      > > > > Subject: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Hello Group.....
                      > > > > Summertime and everyone is VERY quiet!! I
                      > > hope
                      > > > > all of you are having a wonderful, healthy,
                      > > > > productive summer! My computer has been
                      > > acting
                      > > > > up since my Texas GrandSon 'played with it' so
                      > > I'm
                      > > > > having to receive and send eMail via Web.
                      > > > > Please bear with me.... also..... good
                      > > news,
                      > > > > my GrandSon Raymond is out of the hospital and
                      > > > > family here with me.
                      > > > > and......... I leave tomorrow for Honolulu to
                      > > > > observe the reinactment of the signing of WWII
                      > > Peace
                      > > > > Treaty by Japan and the United States on the
                      > > > > MISSOURI....... "Ten Can Sailors" It
                      > > will
                      > > > > be 'heart-wrenching' .... so many memories.
                      > > I
                      > > > > will be keeping in touch with our dynamic
                      > > wonderful
                      > > > > Group by Hotel Computer.
                      > >
                      > === message truncated ===
                      >
                      >
                      > __________________________________________________
                      > Do You Yahoo!?
                      > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                      > http://mail.yahoo.com
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Pitt County Historical Society:
                      http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
                      >
                      > CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering
                      information:
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/
                      >
                      > Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
                      > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst
                      >
                      > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form:
                      http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
                      >
                      > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
                      http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
                      >
                      > http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/
                      >
                      > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
                      if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
                      Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
                      > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >




                      Pitt County Historical Society: http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/

                      CHRONICLES VOL.II AVAILABLE!! Click here for description and ordering information:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/files/

                      Click here to view CHRONICLE PHOTO, use SlideShow:
                      http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/lst

                      RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm

                      Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/

                      http://www.rootsweb.com/~ncpcfr/

                      We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
                      GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir




                      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

                      a.. Visit your group "genpcncfir" on the web.

                      b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      genpcncfir-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                      c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Louise
                      I am 58 and missed the war by a few years, but I love listening to Old Time Radio which was on the radio during the war. It talks about rationing and Jimmy
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 31, 2005
                        I am 58 and missed the war by a few years, but I love listening to Old Time Radio which was on the radio during the war. It talks about rationing and Jimmy Dolittle and all the war news. It sure gives me some ice breakers with the aunts and uncles when I go to get their family history.

                        My mother-in-law sure does remember Pearl Harbor. There was an announcement on the radio that 50 Japanese planes were headed for San Francisco. That is where she lives. There was a blackout curfew. It was a very scary time, but proved untrue. They may have started out, but was turned back by our fighters.

                        The people were behind the war effort in every way possible. They bought war bonds, saved rubber, saved cans of grease from their cooking for medicine, and got down the throat of anybody that didn't. Ofcourse, don't forget the gas ration. That is when American women went to work building planes and etc.

                        If you ever get to leason to any of the Old Time Radio stories I know you would love it. I'm hooked.



                        __________________________________________________
                        Do You Yahoo!?
                        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                        http://mail.yahoo.com

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Louise
                        I don t have a lot of few time at the computer so I printed it all out and am taking it with me to work. Fibber Mcgee and Molly taught me a lot about World
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 31, 2005
                          I don't have a lot of few time at the computer so I printed it all out and am taking it with me to work. Fibber Mcgee and Molly taught me a lot about World War II--as well as Amos and Andy and Lum and Abner. Thank you so much for your memories. Shame on the people today that don't back our war efforts and boys in Iraq. Louise


                          ---------------------------------
                          Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Carol Singh
                          Dear Rhet, Your experience is similar to mine only I lost my family history instead of my family members experience of the major events in American history
                          Message 12 of 14 , Sep 1, 2005
                            Dear Rhet,
                            Your experience is similar to mine only I lost my
                            family history instead of my family members'
                            experience of the major events in American history
                            that shaped their lives. Thanks to computers, it now
                            takes little time and effort to preserve our histories
                            and our experiences.
                            You are also right about people whose lives are
                            so busy that they have no interest now. Once they
                            complete their education and training for their
                            careers and/or get their children off to school, they
                            look around them and start to think. Like you, I spent
                            decades in school and took whatever odd jobs came my
                            way to keep my financial house in order. I barely had
                            time for the living, so obviously I had no energy to
                            expend on the dead. Like you, I have regrets. Instead
                            of going to McDonald's or out for a couple of hours at
                            my favorite Greek restaurant replete with real-live
                            Greeks who almost lifted their American guests from
                            their chairs to teach them their dances, I could have
                            set aside an hour a week to enrich my life in through
                            listening to family and asking questions. I simply
                            figured that there were always birth, census, and
                            death records, wills, marriages, divorces, and deeds.
                            I could get all I needed from these. Of course, I had
                            totally factored out of the equation the courthouse
                            fires that had destroyed decades of records. What a
                            naive little fool I was! Later, Carol

                            --- Rhet Wilkinson <rhet@...> wrote:

                            > Because they aren't interested now doesn't mean they
                            > won't be in years to come and it may be after you
                            > aren't here to tell them any more. If you have
                            > written them down that will still be here for them
                            > to refer to. I had planned to sit down with my
                            > grandmother and record the things she was telling me
                            > about growing up in Georgia. I was going to do it
                            > as soon as I finished getting my masters (while I
                            > was teaching during the day and going to school at
                            > night) She died a week before I completed my
                            > education and I lost the chance. So go ahead and
                            > write those things down. One day they will thank
                            > you even if you aren't still around to hear them.
                            > Rhet
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: Evelyn Hendricks
                            > To: genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 8:31 PM
                            > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                            >
                            >
                            > Camp Lejuene received its name from a French
                            > general, I believe. I was only
                            > twelve at the time, but it seems I remember
                            > something about it. Some people
                            > thought some others should have received the
                            > honor.
                            > I think I will start writing down some of these
                            > things. So far as I know my
                            > children are not interested, although I see a few
                            > signs of interest in the
                            > oldest one. He is my step-son and he is fifty
                            > eight now. Of my other two,
                            > one is fifty and the other is forty-nine. The
                            > step-son is the only married
                            > one and his wife is slightly interested. Maybe if
                            > I wrote down some things
                            > it would spur her on.
                            > I enjoy sharing all the memories you write about.
                            > Evelyn
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                            > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                            > Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 7:57 PM
                            > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                            >
                            >
                            > > Dear Evelyn,
                            > > I love what you had to say. It conveys
                            > perfectly
                            > > how one's actually living through an experience
                            > and
                            > > conveying it to others takes those who did not
                            > share
                            > > those times and gives them an insider's
                            > perspective.
                            > > Instead of being on the outside looking in, they
                            > find
                            > > themselves on the inside looking out.
                            > > Not to portray myself as a "senior" citizen
                            > or as
                            > > heaven forbid "elderly," I have vivid memories
                            > of the
                            > > homefront myself. I grew up on County Home Road.
                            > I
                            > > learned to identify fighter planes like a pro
                            > because
                            > > they were always flying overhead. Many of my kin
                            > were
                            > > stationed at Camp LeJeune before heading
                            > overseas. In
                            > > the evenings Mama and Uncle Mark talked in low
                            > voices
                            > > about who had just been sent and who was likely
                            > to be
                            > > "called up."
                            > > I am so glad you shared the story of Camp
                            > > LeJeune. I had always wanted to know when it
                            > came into
                            > > being. I have long been curious about its name,
                            > too.
                            > > "Le jeune" in French means "The Young" or as we
                            > would
                            > > probably say, "Young People."
                            > > I can imagine that your mother's heart was
                            > in her
                            > > throat when your brother was called into
                            > service. I
                            > > remember my own brother in Viet Nam. Mama,
                            > already ill
                            > > with the effects of treatment for her cancer,
                            > really
                            > > did not need the added strain. All her life she
                            > had
                            > > kept us safe, yet now she had to let one of us
                            > go and
                            > > that without the benefit of her protection and
                            > > counsel.
                            > > As for World War II, I experienced the
                            > black
                            > > outs, the rations, the patriotism. The home
                            > front was
                            > > merely an extension of the battlefield. There
                            > soldiers
                            > > were risking their lives for us. The least we
                            > could do
                            > > was to provide well for them, gladly and without
                            > > complaint.
                            > > Perhaps the most interesting thing that
                            > happened
                            > > to me was awakening one bright, summer morning
                            > in my
                            > > bed with the window open protected only by the
                            > screen.
                            > > It was not a modern, cubbyhole of a window, but
                            > those
                            > > old-fashioned full-length windows that a grown
                            > person
                            > > could easily climb out of. I was idly enjoying
                            > the
                            > > clear, blue sky and listening to bird song and
                            > bees
                            > > buzzing when suddenly there came the roar of a
                            > fighter
                            > > plane.
                            > > A flash of shadow over my screen, and the
                            > plane
                            > > zoomed past almost in reach of my hand if there
                            > had
                            > > been no screen. My impulse was to scream, but
                            > there
                            > > was not time. The next thing I knew I saw the
                            > plane
                            > > touch down in the road in front of the house.
                            > > I dressed quickly and ran outside where
                            > Mama and
                            > > Uncle Mark and every other grown-up had run to
                            > see
                            > > what had happened and to offer assistance.
                            > > Fortunately, the pilot had made a completely
                            > safe
                            > > landing, but he could not fly the plane. People
                            > parked
                            > > their cars at distances on either side of the
                            > plane to
                            > > block traffic until his plane was running again.
                            > This
                            > > experience made me feel even closer to the war.
                            > > Afterwards, of course, I never saw a plane
                            > flying
                            > > overhead without recalling that morning when a
                            > pilot
                            > > came calling.
                            > > The rations had their bright side, too. We
                            > were
                            > > no longer able to purchase white cane sugar, so
                            > Mama
                            > > bought cake decorating sugar. There was yellow
                            > sugar,
                            > > pink sugar, blue sugar, and green sugar. I got
                            > to
                            > > choose the color for each meal, and I chose
                            > plates and
                            > > napkins to complement the color of the sugar. I
                            > > enjoyed waiting for Mama to come back from
                            > grocery
                            > > shopping to see what colors the sugar would be.
                            > That
                            > > was the greatest thing about the war. It brought
                            > new
                            > > color into my life.
                            > > After the war, meal planning was never the
                            > same
                            > > with the return of the white sugar. Fortunately,
                            > our
                            > > kin made it home. Several uncles were medics and
                            > > related their experiences. I was all ears and
                            > full of
                            > > questions. They answered and explained things to
                            > me
                            > > the same as if I were any grown-up friend. As a
                            > > result, I grew up thinking of them as my big
                            > brothers
                            > > instead of uncles. Their experiences really
                            > brought us
                            > > closer together. Later, Carol
                            > >
                            > > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > I very well remember World War II and the day
                            > Pearl
                            > > > Harbor was bombed. My
                            > > > family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a
                            > couple
                            > > > of months before. The
                            > > > government was hastily building the Army Base
                            > at
                            > > > Holly Ridge, just a few
                            > > > miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded
                            > the
                            > > > town of Jacksonville. Camp
                            >
                            === message truncated ===


                            __________________________________________________
                            Do You Yahoo!?
                            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                            http://mail.yahoo.com
                          • Carol Singh
                            Dear Evelyn, I doubt I showed any signs of interest either prior to reaching 60. Forgive me, I am of course only 60+ 1 day old now! Still, I was tremendously
                            Message 13 of 14 , Sep 1, 2005
                              Dear Evelyn,
                              I doubt I showed any signs of interest either
                              prior to reaching 60. Forgive me, I am of course only
                              60+ 1 day old now! Still, I was tremendously
                              interested. My life was just too hectic between
                              children and school and work and sleep for me to crowd
                              in anything else. Additionally, we were without the
                              computers that have changed record sharing and file
                              maintenance. These really sparked my interest--these
                              and the accessibility here at J. Sargeant Reynolds to
                              the World Wide Web a few years back when our college
                              opted to go for it. It changed my life. It gave me
                              back my family. Later, Carol

                              --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:

                              > Camp Lejuene received its name from a French
                              > general, I believe. I was only
                              > twelve at the time, but it seems I remember
                              > something about it. Some people
                              > thought some others should have received the honor.
                              > I think I will start writing down some of these
                              > things. So far as I know my
                              > children are not interested, although I see a few
                              > signs of interest in the
                              > oldest one. He is my step-son and he is fifty eight
                              > now. Of my other two,
                              > one is fifty and the other is forty-nine. The
                              > step-son is the only married
                              > one and his wife is slightly interested. Maybe if I
                              > wrote down some things
                              > it would spur her on.
                              > I enjoy sharing all the memories you write about.
                              > Evelyn
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: "Carol Singh" <csinghworthington@...>
                              > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                              > Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 7:57 PM
                              > Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Touching Base
                              >
                              >
                              > > Dear Evelyn,
                              > > I love what you had to say. It conveys
                              > perfectly
                              > > how one's actually living through an experience
                              > and
                              > > conveying it to others takes those who did not
                              > share
                              > > those times and gives them an insider's
                              > perspective.
                              > > Instead of being on the outside looking in, they
                              > find
                              > > themselves on the inside looking out.
                              > > Not to portray myself as a "senior" citizen
                              > or as
                              > > heaven forbid "elderly," I have vivid memories of
                              > the
                              > > homefront myself. I grew up on County Home Road. I
                              > > learned to identify fighter planes like a pro
                              > because
                              > > they were always flying overhead. Many of my kin
                              > were
                              > > stationed at Camp LeJeune before heading overseas.
                              > In
                              > > the evenings Mama and Uncle Mark talked in low
                              > voices
                              > > about who had just been sent and who was likely to
                              > be
                              > > "called up."
                              > > I am so glad you shared the story of Camp
                              > > LeJeune. I had always wanted to know when it came
                              > into
                              > > being. I have long been curious about its name,
                              > too.
                              > > "Le jeune" in French means "The Young" or as we
                              > would
                              > > probably say, "Young People."
                              > > I can imagine that your mother's heart was in
                              > her
                              > > throat when your brother was called into service.
                              > I
                              > > remember my own brother in Viet Nam. Mama, already
                              > ill
                              > > with the effects of treatment for her cancer,
                              > really
                              > > did not need the added strain. All her life she
                              > had
                              > > kept us safe, yet now she had to let one of us go
                              > and
                              > > that without the benefit of her protection and
                              > > counsel.
                              > > As for World War II, I experienced the black
                              > > outs, the rations, the patriotism. The home front
                              > was
                              > > merely an extension of the battlefield. There
                              > soldiers
                              > > were risking their lives for us. The least we
                              > could do
                              > > was to provide well for them, gladly and without
                              > > complaint.
                              > > Perhaps the most interesting thing that
                              > happened
                              > > to me was awakening one bright, summer morning in
                              > my
                              > > bed with the window open protected only by the
                              > screen.
                              > > It was not a modern, cubbyhole of a window, but
                              > those
                              > > old-fashioned full-length windows that a grown
                              > person
                              > > could easily climb out of. I was idly enjoying the
                              > > clear, blue sky and listening to bird song and
                              > bees
                              > > buzzing when suddenly there came the roar of a
                              > fighter
                              > > plane.
                              > > A flash of shadow over my screen, and the
                              > plane
                              > > zoomed past almost in reach of my hand if there
                              > had
                              > > been no screen. My impulse was to scream, but
                              > there
                              > > was not time. The next thing I knew I saw the
                              > plane
                              > > touch down in the road in front of the house.
                              > > I dressed quickly and ran outside where Mama
                              > and
                              > > Uncle Mark and every other grown-up had run to see
                              > > what had happened and to offer assistance.
                              > > Fortunately, the pilot had made a completely safe
                              > > landing, but he could not fly the plane. People
                              > parked
                              > > their cars at distances on either side of the
                              > plane to
                              > > block traffic until his plane was running again.
                              > This
                              > > experience made me feel even closer to the war.
                              > > Afterwards, of course, I never saw a plane
                              > flying
                              > > overhead without recalling that morning when a
                              > pilot
                              > > came calling.
                              > > The rations had their bright side, too. We
                              > were
                              > > no longer able to purchase white cane sugar, so
                              > Mama
                              > > bought cake decorating sugar. There was yellow
                              > sugar,
                              > > pink sugar, blue sugar, and green sugar. I got to
                              > > choose the color for each meal, and I chose plates
                              > and
                              > > napkins to complement the color of the sugar. I
                              > > enjoyed waiting for Mama to come back from grocery
                              > > shopping to see what colors the sugar would be.
                              > That
                              > > was the greatest thing about the war. It brought
                              > new
                              > > color into my life.
                              > > After the war, meal planning was never the
                              > same
                              > > with the return of the white sugar. Fortunately,
                              > our
                              > > kin made it home. Several uncles were medics and
                              > > related their experiences. I was all ears and full
                              > of
                              > > questions. They answered and explained things to
                              > me
                              > > the same as if I were any grown-up friend. As a
                              > > result, I grew up thinking of them as my big
                              > brothers
                              > > instead of uncles. Their experiences really
                              > brought us
                              > > closer together. Later, Carol
                              > >
                              > > --- Evelyn Hendricks <rebh@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > > I very well remember World War II and the day
                              > Pearl
                              > > > Harbor was bombed. My
                              > > > family had moved to Jacksonville, NC just a
                              > couple
                              > > > of months before. The
                              > > > government was hastily building the Army Base at
                              > > > Holly Ridge, just a few
                              > > > miles away, and Camp Lejuene which surrounded
                              > the
                              > > > town of Jacksonville. Camp
                              > > > Lejuene had not even been named at the time.
                              > That
                              > > > came a few months later.
                              > > > We were standing in line waiting for our turn to
                              > buy
                              > > > a ticket to the only
                              > > > movie theatre in the county. The Marines were
                              > the
                              > > > majority of people in the
                              > > > line. They were seeking a little entertainment
                              > in
                              > > > the little village which
                              > > > had little to offer at that time. A marine in
                              > front
                              > > > of me was smoking. When
                              > > > he put down his arm the hand holding the
                              > cigarette
                              > > > got a little to close to
                              > > > me and the cigarette burned my hand. Just
                              > briefly.
                              > > > Before the movie was over
                              > > > the military police was in the theatre gathering
                              > up
                              > > > the Marines and sending
                              > > > them back to the base. They emptied the
                              > restaurants
                              > > > and every other place
                              > > > they could find them. When we left the theatre
                              > the
                              > > > news was all over the
                              >
                              === message truncated ===


                              __________________________________________________
                              Do You Yahoo!?
                              Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                              http://mail.yahoo.com
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.