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Civil War Hangings in Kinston NC

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  • Jewelle Baker
    Hello Group... Another interesting article gleaned for you from Kinston FreePress today: http://www.kinston.com/ Story of Civil War hangings goes international
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 11, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Group...
      Another interesting article gleaned for you from Kinston FreePress today:
      http://www.kinston.com/

      Story of Civil War hangings goes international
      October 11, 2004


      In the wee hours of Feb. 2, 1864, Confederate forces captured 53 men who had deserted the Stars and Bars and currently wore the uniform of those serving the Stars and Stripes. These men comprised nearly the entire roster of Company F of the Second North Carolina Volunteer Union Infantry.

      Within four months of capture, nearly all were dead. Many became victims of diseases after they were sent to southern prisoner of war camps. Some were branded with a "D" for "deserter" on their hips.

      However, 22 of these men were publicly hanged in Kinston.

      The story of these hangings, once the stuff of local legend, entered this summer into the arena of international study thanks to the efforts of Dr. Donald Collins, a retired history professor from East Carolina University.

      His account of these ill-fated men appeared in the June issue of the CHAB News. CHAB stands for the Confederate Historical Association of Belgium.

      The publication is a popular Civil War magazine, similar to the Civil War Times Illustrated published in the United States.

      "During the past two years, interest in the story of the Kinston hangings has expanded nationally and internationally," Collins said. "Northerners visiting the South are often dumbfounded by the interest of Southerners in the Civil War.

      "They would be more surprised at the intense interest our war has generated throughout the world."

      Germans, Austrians, Australians, Frenchmen, Belgians and other Europeans hold round-table discussions, and European re-enactor groups, fighting as both Federals and Confederates, recreate the battles of Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor and Antietam, Collins explained. The First North Carolina Cavalry has a German branch that has ridden into action for the past 12 years.

      Even the Internet offers evidence of the interest people world-wide have in the American Civil War. One website's greeting reads, "Willkommen auf des Homepages des Union and Confederate Reenactors International," while another says, "Bienvenue sur le site du Club Confedere et Federal de France."

      Dr. Collins' article in CHAB News, titled "General George Pickett and the Mass Execution of Deserters in Civil War Kinston, North Carolina," is just the latest chapter in the story of this professor's personal quest.

      "I became interested in this topic many years ago while doing genealogical research on my great-grandfather, Richard Louis 'R.L.' Collins, who was the husband of Elsy Becton of Lenoir County. R.L. Collins owned a tailor shop next to the Pollock Hotel across from the court house before the Civil War," Collins said.

      "He lost his shop at the beginning of the war when he refused to make a Confederate flag. He even refused to sell the material to make Confederate flags."

      Collins said when he learned that his great-grandfather's death occurred around the time of the Kinston hangings, he suspected that his Union-sympathizing ancestor was possibly one of those who ended up at the end of a rope. R.L. Collins was 31 at the time of his death.

      As the professor meticulously examined documents from that historical period, he pieced together the story of the captured deserters and the Kinston hangings. Major General George Pickett was in command of Confederate forces in the Kinston and Goldsboro areas at the time of the hangings.

      "I never did find out how my great-grandfather died, but being a historian, I decided to write the most detailed story of the hangings possible," Collins explained. "After I completed the article, it took years to get it into print."

      Since the story's first appearance in print, Collins has published an expanded version of the article in The Human Tradition in the Civil War and Reconstruction, published by Scholarly Resources, Inc.

      In Jan. 2003, Collins told the story of the Kinston hangings to the Pickett Society in Richmond, Va., at the annual commemoration of Pickett's birthday.

      Professor Collins has no kind words for Gerard A. Patterson's book, "Justice or Atrocity: General George E. Pickett and the Kinston, N.C. Hangings."

      "I have great disdain for Patterson's book for two reasons. First, he took a subject too short for book-length treatment and padded it with Pickett's love story," Collins said.

      "Even worse, he padded the text with statements that are just outright wrong. He makes mistakes page after page. The courts-martial did not take place at the courthouse but at Pickett's headquarters, first in Kinston and then in Goldsboro. His claims to know the location of the hangings is incorrect because no one knows with certainty just where the hangings took place."

      The retired ECU scholar is in the final stages of completed his latest book. "The Death and Resurrection of Jefferson Davis" is scheduled for release in May 2005.


      Mike Parker is a columnist for The Free Press. He can be reached by e-mail at mparker16@... or in care of this newspaper.

      © 2004 by Freedom ENC Communications. All rights reserved. Content may not be reproduced without written permission from FENC Communications. For questions or comments about this site please email webmaster@....

      **************************************************************************

      Jewelle

      jewellebaker@...
      jewelle@...
      Main SURNAMES;
      CANNON; COX; JACKSON; McLAWHORN (all sp); WINGATE ++++

      GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
      (Serving all Eastern/Coastal NC Counties)
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/messages

      eMail scan by NAV & certified Virus Free





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bob Forbes
      Dear Jewelle & group, I really appreciated the article on the Kinston (or Goldsboro, or wherever they took place) hangings and the meticulous research by Dr.
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 12, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Jewelle & group,

        I really appreciated the article on the Kinston (or Goldsboro, or wherever
        they took place) hangings and the meticulous research by Dr. Collins; thank
        you for sending it. I find it absolutely fascinating that, 140 years after
        an extremely well-documented wartime in American history, we continue dig up
        events and tragedies that have been suppressed for all those years. And I
        think they've been suppressed largely because events like that do not fit
        the romantic image of the confederacy to which so many southerners still
        want to cling. Another case in point was the eyewitness account near the
        war's end by Quaker Joseph Neave that Paula Baker sent out awhile back,
        describing all the danger and devastation... and especially the cruelty on
        the part the South's infamous Home Guard (referred to as 'hunters' in
        Neave's narrative), who basically took over the farms and villages that
        weren't already occupied by the Yankees, and abused their authority to no
        end...

        While we like to think that war brings out the best in our heroes (and
        sometimes it certainly does), we want to forget how much more often it
        brings out the worst and basest human cruelties humankind has to offer.
        Witness the war actions taken today in the Middle East, Africa, etc., and
        see if you can say the years have improved us! Sometimes the only
        'improvements' I see are in the speed and power at which technology allows
        us to annihilate each other, and the 'improved' sophistication of our
        torture methods when we need to extract information. War was, is, and will
        remain Hell on Earth in whatever form we choose to make it. So no matter how
        unpleasant these suppressed events and memories may be, we owe it to
        ourselves and our descendants to bring them out and acknowledge the
        horrors... maybe someday we can keep from repeating them!

        Phew, sorry about the rant this early in the morn, but history can sometimes
        do that to a person. Also sorry I cannot convene w/ other Pitt Countians
        for the PCFR event this weekend due to soccer tournaments and family
        obligations and everything else. Instead will continue to use this amazing
        tool of the Internet (technology can be a good thing too) to share and
        exchange all this wonderful info....

        Bob Forbes
        bforbes@...

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Jewelle Baker" <jewellebaker@...>
        To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
        Cc: <NCGREENE-L@...>; <NCLENOIR-L@...>
        Sent: Monday, October 11, 2004 3:40 PM
        Subject: [genpcncfir] Civil War Hangings in Kinston NC



        Hello Group...
        Another interesting article gleaned for you from Kinston
        FreePress today:
        http://www.kinston.com/

        Story of Civil War hangings goes international
        October 11, 2004


        In the wee hours of Feb. 2, 1864, Confederate forces captured 53 men
        who had deserted the Stars and Bars and currently wore the uniform of those
        serving the Stars and Stripes. These men comprised nearly the entire roster
        of Company F of the Second North Carolina Volunteer Union Infantry.

        Within four months of capture, nearly all were dead. Many became
        victims of diseases after they were sent to southern prisoner of war camps.
        Some were branded with a "D" for "deserter" on their hips.

        However, 22 of these men were publicly hanged in Kinston.

        The story of these hangings, once the stuff of local legend, entered
        this summer into the arena of international study thanks to the efforts of
        Dr. Donald Collins, a retired history professor from East Carolina
        University.

        His account of these ill-fated men appeared in the June issue of the
        CHAB News. CHAB stands for the Confederate Historical Association of
        Belgium.

        The publication is a popular Civil War magazine, similar to the Civil
        War Times Illustrated published in the United States.

        "During the past two years, interest in the story of the Kinston
        hangings has expanded nationally and internationally," Collins said.
        "Northerners visiting the South are often dumbfounded by the interest of
        Southerners in the Civil War.

        "They would be more surprised at the intense interest our war has
        generated throughout the world."

        Germans, Austrians, Australians, Frenchmen, Belgians and other
        Europeans hold round-table discussions, and European re-enactor groups,
        fighting as both Federals and Confederates, recreate the battles of
        Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor and Antietam, Collins explained. The First
        North Carolina Cavalry has a German branch that has ridden into action for
        the past 12 years.

        Even the Internet offers evidence of the interest people world-wide
        have in the American Civil War. One website's greeting reads, "Willkommen
        auf des Homepages des Union and Confederate Reenactors International," while
        another says, "Bienvenue sur le site du Club Confedere et Federal de
        France."

        Dr. Collins' article in CHAB News, titled "General George Pickett and
        the Mass Execution of Deserters in Civil War Kinston, North Carolina," is
        just the latest chapter in the story of this professor's personal quest.

        "I became interested in this topic many years ago while doing
        genealogical research on my great-grandfather, Richard Louis 'R.L.' Collins,
        who was the husband of Elsy Becton of Lenoir County. R.L. Collins owned a
        tailor shop next to the Pollock Hotel across from the court house before the
        Civil War," Collins said.

        "He lost his shop at the beginning of the war when he refused to make
        a Confederate flag. He even refused to sell the material to make Confederate
        flags."

        Collins said when he learned that his great-grandfather's death
        occurred around the time of the Kinston hangings, he suspected that his
        Union-sympathizing ancestor was possibly one of those who ended up at the
        end of a rope. R.L. Collins was 31 at the time of his death.

        As the professor meticulously examined documents from that historical
        period, he pieced together the story of the captured deserters and the
        Kinston hangings. Major General George Pickett was in command of Confederate
        forces in the Kinston and Goldsboro areas at the time of the hangings.

        "I never did find out how my great-grandfather died, but being a
        historian, I decided to write the most detailed story of the hangings
        possible," Collins explained. "After I completed the article, it took years
        to get it into print."

        Since the story's first appearance in print, Collins has published an
        expanded version of the article in The Human Tradition in the Civil War and
        Reconstruction, published by Scholarly Resources, Inc.

        In Jan. 2003, Collins told the story of the Kinston hangings to the
        Pickett Society in Richmond, Va., at the annual commemoration of Pickett's
        birthday.

        Professor Collins has no kind words for Gerard A. Patterson's book,
        "Justice or Atrocity: General George E. Pickett and the Kinston, N.C.
        Hangings."

        "I have great disdain for Patterson's book for two reasons. First, he
        took a subject too short for book-length treatment and padded it with
        Pickett's love story," Collins said.

        "Even worse, he padded the text with statements that are just outright
        wrong. He makes mistakes page after page. The courts-martial did not take
        place at the courthouse but at Pickett's headquarters, first in Kinston and
        then in Goldsboro. His claims to know the location of the hangings is
        incorrect because no one knows with certainty just where the hangings took
        place."

        The retired ECU scholar is in the final stages of completed his latest
        book. "The Death and Resurrection of Jefferson Davis" is scheduled for
        release in May 2005.


        Mike Parker is a columnist for The Free Press. He can be reached by
        e-mail at mparker16@... or in care of this newspaper.

        © 2004 by Freedom ENC Communications. All rights reserved. Content may
        not be reproduced without written permission from FENC Communications. For
        questions or comments about this site please email webmaster@....


        **************************************************************************

        Jewelle

        jewellebaker@...
        jewelle@...
        Main SURNAMES;
        CANNON; COX; JACKSON; McLAWHORN (all sp); WINGATE ++++

        GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
        (Serving all Eastern/Coastal NC Counties)
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/messages

        eMail scan by NAV & certified Virus Free





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        Pitt County Historical Society:
        http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/

        Submit your family for publication FREE in VOLUME II CHRONICALS earmarked
        for 2004/2005. Link here for detail instructions:
        http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/VolumeIIChronicles.htm

        RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form, limited supply:
        http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm

        Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
        http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/

        We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group if
        you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
        Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
        GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In
        Research http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir

        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Larry Ruff
        Excellent editorial, Bob. I agree 100%. Larry Gray Ruff ... From: Bob Forbes To: Sent: Tuesday,
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 12, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Excellent editorial, Bob. I agree 100%.
          Larry Gray Ruff
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Bob Forbes" <bforbes@...>
          To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2004 7:12 AM
          Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Civil War Hangings in Kinston NC


          >
          > Dear Jewelle & group,
          >
          > I really appreciated the article on the Kinston (or Goldsboro, or wherever
          > they took place) hangings and the meticulous research by Dr. Collins;
          > thank
          > you for sending it. I find it absolutely fascinating that, 140 years after
          > an extremely well-documented wartime in American history, we continue dig
          > up
          > events and tragedies that have been suppressed for all those years. And I
          > think they've been suppressed largely because events like that do not fit
          > the romantic image of the confederacy to which so many southerners still
          > want to cling. Another case in point was the eyewitness account near the
          > war's end by Quaker Joseph Neave that Paula Baker sent out awhile back,
          > describing all the danger and devastation... and especially the cruelty on
          > the part the South's infamous Home Guard (referred to as 'hunters' in
          > Neave's narrative), who basically took over the farms and villages that
          > weren't already occupied by the Yankees, and abused their authority to no
          > end...
          >
          > While we like to think that war brings out the best in our heroes (and
          > sometimes it certainly does), we want to forget how much more often it
          > brings out the worst and basest human cruelties humankind has to offer.
          > Witness the war actions taken today in the Middle East, Africa, etc., and
          > see if you can say the years have improved us! Sometimes the only
          > 'improvements' I see are in the speed and power at which technology allows
          > us to annihilate each other, and the 'improved' sophistication of our
          > torture methods when we need to extract information. War was, is, and will
          > remain Hell on Earth in whatever form we choose to make it. So no matter
          > how
          > unpleasant these suppressed events and memories may be, we owe it to
          > ourselves and our descendants to bring them out and acknowledge the
          > horrors... maybe someday we can keep from repeating them!
          >
          > Phew, sorry about the rant this early in the morn, but history can
          > sometimes
          > do that to a person. Also sorry I cannot convene w/ other Pitt Countians
          > for the PCFR event this weekend due to soccer tournaments and family
          > obligations and everything else. Instead will continue to use this
          > amazing
          > tool of the Internet (technology can be a good thing too) to share and
          > exchange all this wonderful info....
          >
          > Bob Forbes
          > bforbes@...
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Jewelle Baker" <jewellebaker@...>
          > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
          > Cc: <NCGREENE-L@...>; <NCLENOIR-L@...>
          > Sent: Monday, October 11, 2004 3:40 PM
          > Subject: [genpcncfir] Civil War Hangings in Kinston NC
          >
          >
          >
          > Hello Group...
          > Another interesting article gleaned for you from Kinston
          > FreePress today:
          > http://www.kinston.com/
          >
          > Story of Civil War hangings goes international
          > October 11, 2004
          >
          >
          > In the wee hours of Feb. 2, 1864, Confederate forces captured 53 men
          > who had deserted the Stars and Bars and currently wore the uniform of
          > those
          > serving the Stars and Stripes. These men comprised nearly the entire
          > roster
          > of Company F of the Second North Carolina Volunteer Union Infantry.
          >
          > Within four months of capture, nearly all were dead. Many became
          > victims of diseases after they were sent to southern prisoner of war
          > camps.
          > Some were branded with a "D" for "deserter" on their hips.
          >
          > However, 22 of these men were publicly hanged in Kinston.
          >
          > The story of these hangings, once the stuff of local legend, entered
          > this summer into the arena of international study thanks to the efforts of
          > Dr. Donald Collins, a retired history professor from East Carolina
          > University.
          >
          > His account of these ill-fated men appeared in the June issue of the
          > CHAB News. CHAB stands for the Confederate Historical Association of
          > Belgium.
          >
          > The publication is a popular Civil War magazine, similar to the Civil
          > War Times Illustrated published in the United States.
          >
          > "During the past two years, interest in the story of the Kinston
          > hangings has expanded nationally and internationally," Collins said.
          > "Northerners visiting the South are often dumbfounded by the interest of
          > Southerners in the Civil War.
          >
          > "They would be more surprised at the intense interest our war has
          > generated throughout the world."
          >
          > Germans, Austrians, Australians, Frenchmen, Belgians and other
          > Europeans hold round-table discussions, and European re-enactor groups,
          > fighting as both Federals and Confederates, recreate the battles of
          > Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor and Antietam, Collins explained. The First
          > North Carolina Cavalry has a German branch that has ridden into action for
          > the past 12 years.
          >
          > Even the Internet offers evidence of the interest people world-wide
          > have in the American Civil War. One website's greeting reads, "Willkommen
          > auf des Homepages des Union and Confederate Reenactors International,"
          > while
          > another says, "Bienvenue sur le site du Club Confedere et Federal de
          > France."
          >
          > Dr. Collins' article in CHAB News, titled "General George Pickett and
          > the Mass Execution of Deserters in Civil War Kinston, North Carolina," is
          > just the latest chapter in the story of this professor's personal quest.
          >
          > "I became interested in this topic many years ago while doing
          > genealogical research on my great-grandfather, Richard Louis 'R.L.'
          > Collins,
          > who was the husband of Elsy Becton of Lenoir County. R.L. Collins owned a
          > tailor shop next to the Pollock Hotel across from the court house before
          > the
          > Civil War," Collins said.
          >
          > "He lost his shop at the beginning of the war when he refused to make
          > a Confederate flag. He even refused to sell the material to make
          > Confederate
          > flags."
          >
          > Collins said when he learned that his great-grandfather's death
          > occurred around the time of the Kinston hangings, he suspected that his
          > Union-sympathizing ancestor was possibly one of those who ended up at the
          > end of a rope. R.L. Collins was 31 at the time of his death.
          >
          > As the professor meticulously examined documents from that historical
          > period, he pieced together the story of the captured deserters and the
          > Kinston hangings. Major General George Pickett was in command of
          > Confederate
          > forces in the Kinston and Goldsboro areas at the time of the hangings.
          >
          > "I never did find out how my great-grandfather died, but being a
          > historian, I decided to write the most detailed story of the hangings
          > possible," Collins explained. "After I completed the article, it took
          > years
          > to get it into print."
          >
          > Since the story's first appearance in print, Collins has published an
          > expanded version of the article in The Human Tradition in the Civil War
          > and
          > Reconstruction, published by Scholarly Resources, Inc.
          >
          > In Jan. 2003, Collins told the story of the Kinston hangings to the
          > Pickett Society in Richmond, Va., at the annual commemoration of Pickett's
          > birthday.
          >
          > Professor Collins has no kind words for Gerard A. Patterson's book,
          > "Justice or Atrocity: General George E. Pickett and the Kinston, N.C.
          > Hangings."
          >
          > "I have great disdain for Patterson's book for two reasons. First, he
          > took a subject too short for book-length treatment and padded it with
          > Pickett's love story," Collins said.
          >
          > "Even worse, he padded the text with statements that are just
          > outright
          > wrong. He makes mistakes page after page. The courts-martial did not take
          > place at the courthouse but at Pickett's headquarters, first in Kinston
          > and
          > then in Goldsboro. His claims to know the location of the hangings is
          > incorrect because no one knows with certainty just where the hangings took
          > place."
          >
          > The retired ECU scholar is in the final stages of completed his
          > latest
          > book. "The Death and Resurrection of Jefferson Davis" is scheduled for
          > release in May 2005.
          >
          >
          > Mike Parker is a columnist for The Free Press. He can be reached by
          > e-mail at mparker16@... or in care of this newspaper.
          >
          > © 2004 by Freedom ENC Communications. All rights reserved. Content
          > may
          > not be reproduced without written permission from FENC Communications. For
          > questions or comments about this site please email webmaster@....
          >
          >
          > **************************************************************************
          >
          > Jewelle
          >
          > jewellebaker@...
          > jewelle@...
          > Main SURNAMES;
          > CANNON; COX; JACKSON; McLAWHORN (all sp); WINGATE ++++
          >
          > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
          > (Serving all Eastern/Coastal NC Counties)
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/messages
          >
          > eMail scan by NAV & certified Virus Free
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Pitt County Historical Society:
          > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
          >
          > Submit your family for publication FREE in VOLUME II CHRONICALS earmarked
          > for 2004/2005. Link here for detail instructions:
          > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/VolumeIIChronicles.htm
          >
          > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form, limited supply:
          > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
          >
          > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
          > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
          >
          > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
          > if
          > you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
          > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
          > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In
          > Research http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Pitt County Historical Society:
          > http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
          >
          > Submit your family for publication FREE in VOLUME II CHRONICALS earmarked
          > for 2004/2005. Link here for detail instructions:
          > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/VolumeIIChronicles.htm
          >
          > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form, limited supply:
          > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
          >
          > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
          > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
          >
          > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
          > if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
          > Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
          > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In
          > Research http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Carol Singh
          Dear Jewelle, On my very first research trip to Greenville, I met Dr. Collins at the Joyner Library, no less. What an impressive and knowledgeable gentleman! I
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 12, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Jewelle, On my very first research trip to
            Greenville, I met Dr. Collins at the Joyner Library,
            no less. What an impressive and knowledgeable
            gentleman! I am truly excited about this information
            that you are sharing. Have you any idea how I might
            come by a copy? I am sure that others of us would also
            like to fill in some gaps in our history, and this
            article might prove helpful. Later, Carol
            --- Jewelle Baker <jewellebaker@...> wrote:

            > Hello Group...
            > Another interesting article gleaned for
            > you from Kinston FreePress today:
            > http://www.kinston.com/
            >
            > Story of Civil War hangings goes international
            >
            > October 11, 2004
            >
            >
            > In the wee hours of Feb. 2, 1864, Confederate
            > forces captured 53 men who had deserted the Stars
            > and Bars and currently wore the uniform of those
            > serving the Stars and Stripes. These men comprised
            > nearly the entire roster of Company F of the Second
            > North Carolina Volunteer Union Infantry.
            >
            > Within four months of capture, nearly all were
            > dead. Many became victims of diseases after they
            > were sent to southern prisoner of war camps. Some
            > were branded with a "D" for "deserter" on their
            > hips.
            >
            > However, 22 of these men were publicly hanged
            > in Kinston.
            >
            > The story of these hangings, once the stuff of
            > local legend, entered this summer into the arena of
            > international study thanks to the efforts of Dr.
            > Donald Collins, a retired history professor from
            > East Carolina University.
            >
            > His account of these ill-fated men appeared in
            > the June issue of the CHAB News. CHAB stands for the
            > Confederate Historical Association of Belgium.
            >
            > The publication is a popular Civil War
            > magazine, similar to the Civil War Times Illustrated
            > published in the United States.
            >
            > "During the past two years, interest in the
            > story of the Kinston hangings has expanded
            > nationally and internationally," Collins said.
            > "Northerners visiting the South are often
            > dumbfounded by the interest of Southerners in the
            > Civil War.
            >
            > "They would be more surprised at the intense
            > interest our war has generated throughout the
            > world."
            >
            > Germans, Austrians, Australians, Frenchmen,
            > Belgians and other Europeans hold round-table
            > discussions, and European re-enactor groups,
            > fighting as both Federals and Confederates, recreate
            > the battles of Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor and
            > Antietam, Collins explained. The First North
            > Carolina Cavalry has a German branch that has ridden
            > into action for the past 12 years.
            >
            > Even the Internet offers evidence of the
            > interest people world-wide have in the American
            > Civil War. One website's greeting reads, "Willkommen
            > auf des Homepages des Union and Confederate
            > Reenactors International," while another says,
            > "Bienvenue sur le site du Club Confedere et Federal
            > de France."
            >
            > Dr. Collins' article in CHAB News, titled
            > "General George Pickett and the Mass Execution of
            > Deserters in Civil War Kinston, North Carolina," is
            > just the latest chapter in the story of this
            > professor's personal quest.
            >
            > "I became interested in this topic many years
            > ago while doing genealogical research on my
            > great-grandfather, Richard Louis 'R.L.' Collins, who
            > was the husband of Elsy Becton of Lenoir County.
            > R.L. Collins owned a tailor shop next to the Pollock
            > Hotel across from the court house before the Civil
            > War," Collins said.
            >
            > "He lost his shop at the beginning of the war
            > when he refused to make a Confederate flag. He even
            > refused to sell the material to make Confederate
            > flags."
            >
            > Collins said when he learned that his
            > great-grandfather's death occurred around the time
            > of the Kinston hangings, he suspected that his
            > Union-sympathizing ancestor was possibly one of
            > those who ended up at the end of a rope. R.L.
            > Collins was 31 at the time of his death.
            >
            > As the professor meticulously examined
            > documents from that historical period, he pieced
            > together the story of the captured deserters and the
            > Kinston hangings. Major General George Pickett was
            > in command of Confederate forces in the Kinston and
            > Goldsboro areas at the time of the hangings.
            >
            > "I never did find out how my great-grandfather
            > died, but being a historian, I decided to write the
            > most detailed story of the hangings possible,"
            > Collins explained. "After I completed the article,
            > it took years to get it into print."
            >
            > Since the story's first appearance in print,
            > Collins has published an expanded version of the
            > article in The Human Tradition in the Civil War and
            > Reconstruction, published by Scholarly Resources,
            > Inc.
            >
            > In Jan. 2003, Collins told the story of the
            > Kinston hangings to the Pickett Society in Richmond,
            > Va., at the annual commemoration of Pickett's
            > birthday.
            >
            > Professor Collins has no kind words for Gerard
            > A. Patterson's book, "Justice or Atrocity: General
            > George E. Pickett and the Kinston, N.C. Hangings."
            >
            > "I have great disdain for Patterson's book for
            > two reasons. First, he took a subject too short for
            > book-length treatment and padded it with Pickett's
            > love story," Collins said.
            >
            > "Even worse, he padded the text with
            > statements that are just outright wrong. He makes
            > mistakes page after page. The courts-martial did not
            > take place at the courthouse but at Pickett's
            > headquarters, first in Kinston and then in
            > Goldsboro. His claims to know the location of the
            > hangings is incorrect because no one knows with
            > certainty just where the hangings took place."
            >
            > The retired ECU scholar is in the final stages
            > of completed his latest book. "The Death and
            > Resurrection of Jefferson Davis" is scheduled for
            > release in May 2005.
            >
            >
            > Mike Parker is a columnist for The Free Press.
            > He can be reached by e-mail at mparker16@... or
            > in care of this newspaper.
            >
            > � 2004 by Freedom ENC Communications. All
            > rights reserved. Content may not be reproduced
            > without written permission from FENC Communications.
            > For questions or comments about this site please
            > email webmaster@....
            >
            >
            >
            **************************************************************************
            >
            > Jewelle
            >
            > jewellebaker@...
            > jewelle@...
            > Main SURNAMES;
            > CANNON; COX; JACKSON; McLAWHORN (all sp);
            > WINGATE ++++
            >
            > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
            > (Serving all Eastern/Coastal NC Counties)
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
            >
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/messages
            >
            > eMail scan by NAV & certified Virus Free
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            >
            >




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          • Carol Singh
            Dear Bob, My sentiments exactly and on all points. As Mark Twain has Huckleberry Finn say, People can be awful mean to each other sometimes (or to that
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 12, 2004
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              Dear Bob, My sentiments exactly and on all points. As
              Mark Twain has Huckleberry Finn say, "People can be
              awful mean to each other sometimes" (or to that
              effect). It is admirable when one fights for his
              convictions, but it is sad when anyone forgets that no
              matter what side of an argument a person is on, every
              one of us has common needs--the Shylock speech from
              Shakespeare, "Isn't a Jew a person? Doesn't he bleed
              the same as anyone else. . . ." If any good is to come
              of the sacrifices our soldiers everywhere have made,
              it is that we remember those who made the sacrifices,
              feel sad for every injury and life lost, and that we
              resolve to try to settle our own differences without
              resorting to conflict. To do so will bring honor to
              all soldiers regardless of the war in which they
              fought or the side they were on. Later, Carol
              --- Bob Forbes <bforbes@...> wrote:

              > Dear Jewelle & group,
              >
              > I really appreciated the article on the Kinston (or
              > Goldsboro, or wherever
              > they took place) hangings and the meticulous
              > research by Dr. Collins; thank
              > you for sending it. I find it absolutely fascinating
              > that, 140 years after
              > an extremely well-documented wartime in American
              > history, we continue dig up
              > events and tragedies that have been suppressed for
              > all those years. And I
              > think they've been suppressed largely because events
              > like that do not fit
              > the romantic image of the confederacy to which so
              > many southerners still
              > want to cling. Another case in point was the
              > eyewitness account near the
              > war's end by Quaker Joseph Neave that Paula Baker
              > sent out awhile back,
              > describing all the danger and devastation... and
              > especially the cruelty on
              > the part the South's infamous Home Guard (referred
              > to as 'hunters' in
              > Neave's narrative), who basically took over the
              > farms and villages that
              > weren't already occupied by the Yankees, and abused
              > their authority to no
              > end...
              >
              > While we like to think that war brings out the best
              > in our heroes (and
              > sometimes it certainly does), we want to forget how
              > much more often it
              > brings out the worst and basest human cruelties
              > humankind has to offer.
              > Witness the war actions taken today in the Middle
              > East, Africa, etc., and
              > see if you can say the years have improved us!
              > Sometimes the only
              > 'improvements' I see are in the speed and power at
              > which technology allows
              > us to annihilate each other, and the 'improved'
              > sophistication of our
              > torture methods when we need to extract information.
              > War was, is, and will
              > remain Hell on Earth in whatever form we choose to
              > make it. So no matter how
              > unpleasant these suppressed events and memories may
              > be, we owe it to
              > ourselves and our descendants to bring them out and
              > acknowledge the
              > horrors... maybe someday we can keep from repeating
              > them!
              >
              > Phew, sorry about the rant this early in the morn,
              > but history can sometimes
              > do that to a person. Also sorry I cannot convene w/
              > other Pitt Countians
              > for the PCFR event this weekend due to soccer
              > tournaments and family
              > obligations and everything else. Instead will
              > continue to use this amazing
              > tool of the Internet (technology can be a good thing
              > too) to share and
              > exchange all this wonderful info....
              >
              > Bob Forbes
              > bforbes@...
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "Jewelle Baker" <jewellebaker@...>
              > To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
              > Cc: <NCGREENE-L@...>;
              > <NCLENOIR-L@...>
              > Sent: Monday, October 11, 2004 3:40 PM
              > Subject: [genpcncfir] Civil War Hangings in Kinston
              > NC
              >
              >
              >
              > Hello Group...
              > Another interesting article gleaned for
              > you from Kinston
              > FreePress today:
              > http://www.kinston.com/
              >
              > Story of Civil War hangings goes international
              > October 11, 2004
              >
              >
              > In the wee hours of Feb. 2, 1864, Confederate
              > forces captured 53 men
              > who had deserted the Stars and Bars and currently
              > wore the uniform of those
              > serving the Stars and Stripes. These men comprised
              > nearly the entire roster
              > of Company F of the Second North Carolina Volunteer
              > Union Infantry.
              >
              > Within four months of capture, nearly all were
              > dead. Many became
              > victims of diseases after they were sent to southern
              > prisoner of war camps.
              > Some were branded with a "D" for "deserter" on their
              > hips.
              >
              > However, 22 of these men were publicly hanged
              > in Kinston.
              >
              > The story of these hangings, once the stuff of
              > local legend, entered
              > this summer into the arena of international study
              > thanks to the efforts of
              > Dr. Donald Collins, a retired history professor from
              > East Carolina
              > University.
              >
              > His account of these ill-fated men appeared in
              > the June issue of the
              > CHAB News. CHAB stands for the Confederate
              > Historical Association of
              > Belgium.
              >
              > The publication is a popular Civil War
              > magazine, similar to the Civil
              > War Times Illustrated published in the United
              > States.
              >
              > "During the past two years, interest in the
              > story of the Kinston
              > hangings has expanded nationally and
              > internationally," Collins said.
              > "Northerners visiting the South are often
              > dumbfounded by the interest of
              > Southerners in the Civil War.
              >
              > "They would be more surprised at the intense
              > interest our war has
              > generated throughout the world."
              >
              > Germans, Austrians, Australians, Frenchmen,
              > Belgians and other
              > Europeans hold round-table discussions, and European
              > re-enactor groups,
              > fighting as both Federals and Confederates, recreate
              > the battles of
              > Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor and Antietam, Collins
              > explained. The First
              > North Carolina Cavalry has a German branch that has
              > ridden into action for
              > the past 12 years.
              >
              > Even the Internet offers evidence of the
              > interest people world-wide
              > have in the American Civil War. One website's
              > greeting reads, "Willkommen
              > auf des Homepages des Union and Confederate
              > Reenactors International," while
              > another says, "Bienvenue sur le site du Club
              > Confedere et Federal de
              > France."
              >
              > Dr. Collins' article in CHAB News, titled
              > "General George Pickett and
              > the Mass Execution of Deserters in Civil War
              > Kinston, North Carolina," is
              > just the latest chapter in the story of this
              > professor's personal quest.
              >
              > "I became interested in this topic many years
              > ago while doing
              > genealogical research on my great-grandfather,
              > Richard Louis 'R.L.' Collins,
              > who was the husband of Elsy Becton of Lenoir County.
              > R.L. Collins owned a
              > tailor shop next to the Pollock Hotel across from
              > the court house before the
              > Civil War," Collins said.
              >
              > "He lost his shop at the beginning of the war
              > when he refused to make
              > a Confederate flag. He even refused to sell the
              > material to make Confederate
              > flags."
              >
              > Collins said when he learned that his
              > great-grandfather's death
              > occurred around the time of the Kinston hangings, he
              > suspected that his
              > Union-sympathizing ancestor was possibly one of
              > those who ended up at the
              > end of a rope. R.L. Collins was 31 at the time of
              > his death.
              >
              > As the professor meticulously examined
              > documents from that historical
              > period, he pieced together the story of the captured
              > deserters and the
              > Kinston hangings. Major General George Pickett was
              > in command of Confederate
              >
              === message truncated ===




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            • Jewelle Baker
              Dear Carol..... and Group... Glad all of you enjoyed the article. It is in its entirety so I suggest you print a copy for your files...... or copy and
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 13, 2004
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                Dear Carol..... and Group...
                Glad all of you enjoyed the article. It is
                in its entirety so I suggest you print a copy for
                your files......
                or
                copy and paste just the article in Word or NotePad
                then print... if you don't want it in eMail context.
                or
                link to the FreePress and print from there.
                Jewelle

                jewelle@...
                jewellebaker@...
                Main Surnames:
                BAKER, CANNON, COX, JACKSON,
                McGLAWHORN (all sp), WINGATE, +++

                GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
                (serving all Eastern/Coastal NC Counties)
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/messages

                eMail scan by NAV and is Virus Free

                At 06:20 PM 10/12/2004, Carol wrote:

                >Dear Jewelle, On my very first research trip to
                >Greenville, I met Dr. Collins at the Joyner Library,
                >no less. What an impressive and knowledgeable
                >gentleman! I am truly excited about this information
                >that you are sharing. Have you any idea how I might
                >come by a copy? I am sure that others of us would also
                >like to fill in some gaps in our history, and this
                >article might prove helpful. Later, Carol
                >--- Jewelle Baker <jewellebaker@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Hello Group...
                > > Another interesting article gleaned for
                > > you from Kinston FreePress today:
                > > http://www.kinston.com/
                > >
                > > Story of Civil War hangings goes international
                > >
                > > October 11, 2004
                > >
                <SNIP>

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lou-BB
                Jewell, Please email me this again. Some how mine was deleted....:( Linda Bottoms Bass PS. Does any one have anything on a Ezra Bullock and his wife, Mary
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 13, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  Jewell,
                  Please email me this again. Some how mine was deleted....:(
                  Linda Bottoms Bass

                  PS. Does any one have anything on a Ezra Bullock and his wife, Mary Webb?

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Jewelle Baker" <jewellebaker@...>
                  To: <genpcncfir@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, October 13, 2004 12:24 PM
                  Subject: Re: [genpcncfir] Civil War Hangings in Kinston NC


                  >
                  > Dear Carol..... and Group...
                  > Glad all of you enjoyed the article. It is
                  > in its entirety so I suggest you print a copy for
                  > your files......
                  > or
                  > copy and paste just the article in Word or NotePad
                  > then print... if you don't want it in eMail context.
                  > or
                  > link to the FreePress and print from there.
                  > Jewelle
                  >
                  > jewelle@...
                  > jewellebaker@...
                  > Main Surnames:
                  > BAKER, CANNON, COX, JACKSON,
                  > McGLAWHORN (all sp), WINGATE, +++
                  >
                  > GenealogyPITT Co NC Friends In Research
                  > (serving all Eastern/Coastal NC Counties)
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir/messages
                  >
                  > eMail scan by NAV and is Virus Free
                  >
                  > At 06:20 PM 10/12/2004, Carol wrote:
                  >
                  > >Dear Jewelle, On my very first research trip to
                  > >Greenville, I met Dr. Collins at the Joyner Library,
                  > >no less. What an impressive and knowledgeable
                  > >gentleman! I am truly excited about this information
                  > >that you are sharing. Have you any idea how I might
                  > >come by a copy? I am sure that others of us would also
                  > >like to fill in some gaps in our history, and this
                  > >article might prove helpful. Later, Carol
                  > >--- Jewelle Baker <jewellebaker@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Hello Group...
                  > > > Another interesting article gleaned for
                  > > > you from Kinston FreePress today:
                  > > > http://www.kinston.com/
                  > > >
                  > > > Story of Civil War hangings goes international
                  > > >
                  > > > October 11, 2004
                  > > >
                  > <SNIP>
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Pitt County Historical Society:
                  http://www.pittcountyhistoricalsociety.com/
                  >
                  > Submit your family for publication FREE in VOLUME II CHRONICALS earmarked
                  for 2004/2005. Link here for detail instructions:
                  > http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/VolumeIIChronicles.htm
                  >
                  > RePrint of 1982 Chronicles of Pitt Co Order Form, limited supply:
                  http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/Chronicles%20Flyer%20Feb03.htm
                  >
                  > Treasure-Trove of PITT Co.NC Genealogical Resources:
                  http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nc/county/pitt/
                  >
                  > We welcome all Archives visitors and invite you to join our dynamic group
                  if you are interested in genealogy discussion and research in Pitt and all
                  Eastern and Coastal North Carolina counties.
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                  > Research http://groups.yahoo.com/group/genpcncfir
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