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JAMES COFFEE TURNBO father of Silas Turnbo

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    · JAMES COFFEE TURNBO was born February 13, 1820 on Sugar Creek in Maury County, Tennessee · , Was 2nd Lieut. 14th (Powers) Arkansas Infantry. Enlisted in
    Message 1 of 1 , May 30 1:52 AM
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      · JAMES COFFEE TURNBO was born February 13, 1820 on Sugar Creek in
      Maury County, Tennessee

      · , Was 2nd Lieut. 14th (Powers) Arkansas Infantry. Enlisted in
      Yellville, Ark 11 July 1861



      Fourteenth Infantry Ark

      20 Feb 2008

      T he area known as Camp Adams was located on the south side of Crooked
      Creek just across from the main area of downtown Yellville. In 1862,
      this entire stretch of land belonged to Matthew Adams, a well-known
      citizen and early settler of the Marion County Area.

      People of today have to have some imagination to see this camp as it was
      during the Civil War. State Highway 14 did not exist thus any Highway 14
      bridge across Crooked Creek. The Yellville City Park and Verl Doshier's
      pasture encompass this plain today.1

      Yellville was an important confederate recruiting center for North
      Arkansas with two regiments of infantry formed in Yellville over the
      course of the war. In August of 1861 the 14th Arkansas Infantry Regiment
      was mustered. The 14th Arkansas Infantry, the first of two regiments to
      bear that designation (the other being McCarver's short-lived regiment),
      was organized at Yellville in August, 1861, composed of ten companies
      from the counties of Carroll, Fulton, Izard, Marion, Newton and Searcy,
      numbering 939 officers and men. State Senator William Christmas
      Mitchell was elected colonel.





      During its short existence, the 14th Arkansas fought at Pea Ridge,
      Arkansas (March 7-8, 1862); the Corinth Campaign (May to June, 1862);
      Iuka, Mississippi (September 19, 1862); Corinth, Mississippi (October
      3-4, 1862), and the siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana (May to July 1863).

      On September 10, 1862, about 30 men were transferred to Co. K, 27th
      Texas Cavalry (1st Texas Lancers). 2





      JAMES COFFEE TURNBO was born February 13, 1820 on Sugar Creek in Maury
      County, Tennessee and he died June 14, 1870, Keesee, Marion County,
      Arkansas. When he was young he left his parent's old home place
      bound for Taney County, Missouri. His sister Gracie and her husband,
      Martin lived in Taney County, coming there from Tennessee. James Coffee
      was 20 years old and he was accompanied by two other men named Shipman.
      They went to Memphis a foot then embarked on a steamboat for Little
      Rock, Arkansas. They stayed in Little Rock a few days then caught
      another steamboat there to Ozark, Arkansas. From there they finally
      reached a Port known as Carrollton, Arkansas.

      The journey from Tennessee to Taney County was started in the spring of
      1840. From Carrolton, Arkansas James Coffee and two companions started
      out a foot again. This time their destination was Forsyth, Missouri.
      After completion of this journey, James Coffee Turnbo settled on a small
      farm near Forsyth, Missouri, during the winter of 1841-1842. A year or
      so later he married Eliza Onstott. James was 21 years old when he built
      his first log hut here and kept "batch" until he married in the later
      part of 1842 in Taney County, Missouri. Eliza must have been about 17
      when they got married. His wife, ELIZA ONSTOTT was born in 1824 and she
      died on January 15, 1868 with pneumonia. James and Eliza are both buried
      in an old burial place on the north side of White River in Keesee
      Township in Marion County, Arkansas. This grave yard was known in the
      early days as the Hooden Pile Grave Yard and later it was called the
      Riddle Grave Yard. Eliza's parents were David Onstott and Peggy
      Smith.

      James was considered to be quite successful for his day. Indications are
      that he had mechanic's skills and the desire to market them for mill
      building and timber work. He sold surplus products down river and
      commonly hired farm hands. In the 1850's after steamboats began to
      arrive regularly in the Turnbo neighborhood, James purchased bulk
      coffee, salt, sugar, and whiskey that he resold for cash or cattle.
      Additionally, James had mature oxen which he rented to others for
      "breaking the land." He was quick to try the "new" sorghum seed in
      spring 1858 after acquiring the seed on a trip to visit his relatives in
      middle Tennessee.

      James was lucky to survive the Civil War. He had a short career as a
      Lieutenant in Capt. Lewis Hudson's company of the Fourteenth
      Arkansas Infantry, and then resigned his commission. He spent most of
      the war at home raising crops, protecting his family of eight children,
      and providing money to son Silas, who spent three years in the Twenty
      seventh Arkansas Infantry.

      In 1844 James and Eliza moved to Beaver Creek where they remained until
      1849. In 1849 they moved further downriver to the mouth of Elbow Creek.
      In 1853 James and Eliza paid $525 for a claim in southeast Taney County
      on the White River across from Panther Bottom. They built a new log
      house there and remained there until 1859. In 1859 they moved to the
      north side of White River in Keesee Township, Marion County, Arkansas
      (purchased the farm crop and part of the stock for $700) and they lived
      there until they died.

      James C. Turnbo married a second time after Eliza died but we don't
      know her name for sure. It is said her name was "Cola Ann" and she had a
      son by a previous marriage by the name of Porter.







      Was 2nd Lieut. 14th (Powers) Arkansas Infantry. Enlisted in Yellville,
      Ark 11 July 1861





      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      JAMES COFFEE TURNBO was born February 13, 1820 on Sugar Creek in Maury
      County, Tennessee and he died June 14, 1870, Keesee, Marion County,
      Arkansas. When he was young he left his parent's old home place
      bound for Taney County, Missouri. His sister Gracie and her husband,
      Martin lived in Taney County, coming there from Tennessee. James Coffee
      was 20 years old and he was accompanied by two other men named Shipman.
      They went to Memphis a foot then embarked on a steamboat for Little
      Rock, Arkansas. They stayed in Little Rock a few days then caught
      another steamboat there to Ozark, Arkansas. From there they finally
      reached a Port known as Carrollton, Arkansas.

      The journey from Tennessee to Taney County was started in the spring of
      1840. From Carrolton, Arkansas James Coffee and two companions started
      out a foot again. This time their destination was Forsyth, Missouri.
      After completion of this journey, James Coffee Turnbo settled on a small
      farm near Forsyth, Missouri, during the winter of 1841-1842. A year or
      so later he married Eliza Onstott. James was 21 years old when he built
      his first log hut here and kept "batch" until he married in the later
      part of 1842 in Taney County, Missouri. Eliza must have been about 17
      when they got married. His wife, ELIZA ONSTOTT was born in 1824 and she
      died on January 15, 1868 with pneumonia. James and Eliza are both buried
      in an old burial place on the north side of White River in Keesee
      Township in Marion County, Arkansas. This grave yard was known in the
      early days as the Hooden Pile Grave Yard and later it was called the
      Riddle Grave Yard. Eliza's parents were David Onstott and Peggy
      Smith.

      James was considered to be quite successful for his day. Indications are
      that he had mechanic's skills and the desire to market them for mill
      building and timber work. He sold surplus products down river and
      commonly hired farm hands. In the 1850's after steamboats began to
      arrive regularly in the Turnbo neighborhood, James purchased bulk
      coffee, salt, sugar, and whiskey that he resold for cash or cattle.
      Additionally, James had mature oxen which he rented to others for
      "breaking the land." He was quick to try the "new" sorghum seed in
      spring 1858 after acquiring the seed on a trip to visit his relatives in
      middle Tennessee.

      James was lucky to survive the Civil War. He had a short career as a
      Lieutenant in Capt. Lewis Hudson's company of the Fourteenth
      Arkansas Infantry, and then resigned his commission. He spent most of
      the war at home raising crops, protecting his family of eight children,
      and providing money to son Silas, who spent three years in the Twenty
      seventh Arkansas Infantry.

      In 1844 James and Eliza moved to Beaver Creek where they remained until
      1849. In 1849 they moved further downriver to the mouth of Elbow Creek.
      In 1853 James and Eliza paid $525 for a claim in southeast Taney County
      on the White River across from Panther Bottom. They built a new log
      house there and remained there until 1859. In 1859 they moved to the
      north side of White River in Keesee Township, Marion County, Arkansas
      (purchased the farm crop and part of the stock for $700) and they lived
      there until they died.

      James C. Turnbo married a second time after Eliza died but we don't
      know her name for sure. It is said her name was "Cola Ann" and she had a
      son by a previous marriage by the name of Porter.




      James is the Father of Silas Claiborn Turnbo

      Birth 26 May 1844 in , Taney, Missouri, USA
      <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=6044065&pid=-1275544490&eid=1\
      556427998>
      Death 27 Mar 1925 in Broken Arrow, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
      <http://places.ancestry.com/index.aspx?tid=6044065&pid=-1275544490&eid=1\
      556427999>



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