Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Central European German migrations

Expand Messages
  • Michael Maher
    I m not sure if my area of interest fits into your expertise... My interest is in learning the whys and hows of migration to the US from the German
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 24, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm not sure if my area of interest fits into your expertise... My interest
      is in learning the whys and hows of migration to the US from the German
      kingdoms/duchies in what is now northern Bavaria. My maternal
      g-grandparents left the Saxe-Coburg region (tiny village of Firmelsdorf) in
      the mid-1850s and went to Mendota, Illinois. The other maternal side left
      Luxembourg at about the same time and also went to Mendota. Both told the
      enumerator on the 1860 census that they were from Prussia. I am interested
      in why they left their countries of origin, why they went to Illinois, and
      why they both said Prussia??? In later censuses both families (at least
      their children) then told the enumerators "Luxembourg" and "Saxe-Coburg"
      (with assorted spellings). The surnames of interest are Jacob[s] and
      Reiter. If this is something you have knowledge of, I would appreciate any
      leads in the right direction (I do not speak or read German). Thanks in
      advance for any assistance.

      Mike


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mark F Rabideau
      Hi Michael Here are a bunch of German-Prussian histories: http://www.many-roads.com/libraries/prussia-histories/ Many are in German, so it might be time to fix
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 25, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Michael

        Here are a bunch of German-Prussian histories:
        http://www.many-roads.com/libraries/prussia-histories/

        Many are in German, so it might be time to fix your German vocabulary
        issues, but some are in English.

        In order to determine a viable answer to your family circumstances/
        motivations for emmigration, you will need to understand local history
        for the communities from which your folks came. Almost certainly that
        will require reading German.

        You can start off your German-Prussian history awareness on wikipedia.
        It is a wonderful source of general information. Also you might want to
        view some of the web sites I have linked here:

        http://www.many-roads.com/link-directory/

        I hope this helps.

        Pax Vobiscum,
        ...mark (Mark Rabideau)

        ManyRoads Family Genealogist (Rabideau-Henss Family)
        Visit us at: http://many-roads.com
        Snail mail at: 711 Nob Hill Trail - Franktown,CO USA - 80116-8717
        phone:+1.303.660.9400 fax:+1.303.660.9217
        member: Association of Professional Genealogists & National Genealogical
        Society
        _____________________________________________________________________
        "It’s always useful to know where a friend-and-relation is, whether you
        want him or whether you don’t."
        Rabbit, Pooh’s Little Instruction Book (Winnie the Pooh)







        On Thu, 2011-02-24 at 08:29 -0500, Michael Maher wrote:

        >
        >
        > I'm not sure if my area of interest fits into your expertise... My
        > interest
        > is in learning the whys and hows of migration to the US from the
        > German
        > kingdoms/duchies in what is now northern Bavaria. My maternal
        > g-grandparents left the Saxe-Coburg region (tiny village of
        > Firmelsdorf) in
        > the mid-1850s and went to Mendota, Illinois. The other maternal side
        > left
        > Luxembourg at about the same time and also went to Mendota. Both told
        > the
        > enumerator on the 1860 census that they were from Prussia. I am
        > interested
        > in why they left their countries of origin, why they went to Illinois,
        > and
        > why they both said Prussia??? In later censuses both families (at
        > least
        > their children) then told the enumerators "Luxembourg" and
        > "Saxe-Coburg"
        > (with assorted spellings). The surnames of interest are Jacob[s] and
        > Reiter. If this is something you have knowledge of, I would appreciate
        > any
        > leads in the right direction (I do not speak or read German). Thanks
        > in
        > advance for any assistance.
        >
        > Mike
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Peggy
        Does anyone translate German written in the old script? I have several letters from 1890 s to 1900 s I would love to read! TIA P. Ingles
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 25, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Does anyone translate German written in the old script? I have several letters from 1890's to 1900's I would love to read!
          TIA
          P. Ingles

          --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, Mark F Rabideau <genealogy@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Michael
          >
          > Here are a bunch of German-Prussian histories:
          > http://www.many-roads.com/libraries/prussia-histories/
          >
          > Many are in German, so it might be time to fix your German vocabulary
          > issues, but some are in English.
          >
          > In order to determine a viable answer to your family circumstances/
          > motivations for emmigration, you will need to understand local history
          > for the communities from which your folks came. Almost certainly that
          > will require reading German.
          >
          > You can start off your German-Prussian history awareness on wikipedia.
          > It is a wonderful source of general information. Also you might want to
          > view some of the web sites I have linked here:
          >
          > http://www.many-roads.com/link-directory/
          >
          > I hope this helps.
          >
          > Pax Vobiscum,
          > ...mark (Mark Rabideau)
          >
          > ManyRoads Family Genealogist (Rabideau-Henss Family)
          > Visit us at: http://many-roads.com
          > Snail mail at: 711 Nob Hill Trail - Franktown,CO USA - 80116-8717
          > phone:+1.303.660.9400 fax:+1.303.660.9217
          > member: Association of Professional Genealogists & National Genealogical
          > Society
          > _____________________________________________________________________
          > "It’s always useful to know where a friend-and-relation is, whether you
          > want him or whether you don’t."
          > Rabbit, Pooh’s Little Instruction Book (Winnie the Pooh)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Thu, 2011-02-24 at 08:29 -0500, Michael Maher wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > I'm not sure if my area of interest fits into your expertise... My
          > > interest
          > > is in learning the whys and hows of migration to the US from the
          > > German
          > > kingdoms/duchies in what is now northern Bavaria. My maternal
          > > g-grandparents left the Saxe-Coburg region (tiny village of
          > > Firmelsdorf) in
          > > the mid-1850s and went to Mendota, Illinois. The other maternal side
          > > left
          > > Luxembourg at about the same time and also went to Mendota. Both told
          > > the
          > > enumerator on the 1860 census that they were from Prussia. I am
          > > interested
          > > in why they left their countries of origin, why they went to Illinois,
          > > and
          > > why they both said Prussia??? In later censuses both families (at
          > > least
          > > their children) then told the enumerators "Luxembourg" and
          > > "Saxe-Coburg"
          > > (with assorted spellings). The surnames of interest are Jacob[s] and
          > > Reiter. If this is something you have knowledge of, I would appreciate
          > > any
          > > leads in the right direction (I do not speak or read German). Thanks
          > > in
          > > advance for any assistance.
          > >
          > > Mike
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Mark F Rabideau
          Yes, information may be found here: http://www.many-roads.com/manyroads-services/ Pax Vobiscum, ...mark (Mark Rabideau) ManyRoads Family Genealogist
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 25, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Yes, information may be found here:
            http://www.many-roads.com/manyroads-services/

            Pax Vobiscum,
            ...mark (Mark Rabideau)

            ManyRoads Family Genealogist (Rabideau-Henss Family)
            Visit us at: http://many-roads.com
            Snail mail at: 711 Nob Hill Trail - Franktown,CO USA - 80116-8717
            phone:+1.303.660.9400 fax:+1.303.660.9217
            member: Association of Professional Genealogists & National Genealogical
            Society
            _____________________________________________________________________
            "It’s always useful to know where a friend-and-relation is, whether you
            want him or whether you don’t."
            Rabbit, Pooh’s Little Instruction Book (Winnie the Pooh)







            On Fri, 2011-02-25 at 18:13 +0000, Peggy wrote:

            >
            >
            > Does anyone translate German written in the old script? I have several
            > letters from 1890's to 1900's I would love to read!
            > TIA
            > P. Ingles
            >
            > --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, Mark F Rabideau
            > <genealogy@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi Michael
            > >
            > > Here are a bunch of German-Prussian histories:
            > > http://www.many-roads.com/libraries/prussia-histories/
            > >
            > > Many are in German, so it might be time to fix your German
            > vocabulary
            > > issues, but some are in English.
            > >
            > > In order to determine a viable answer to your family circumstances/
            > > motivations for emmigration, you will need to understand local
            > history
            > > for the communities from which your folks came. Almost certainly
            > that
            > > will require reading German.
            > >
            > > You can start off your German-Prussian history awareness on
            > wikipedia.
            > > It is a wonderful source of general information. Also you might want
            > to
            > > view some of the web sites I have linked here:
            > >
            > > http://www.many-roads.com/link-directory/
            > >
            > > I hope this helps.
            > >
            > > Pax Vobiscum,
            > > ...mark (Mark Rabideau)
            > >
            > > ManyRoads Family Genealogist (Rabideau-Henss Family)
            > > Visit us at: http://many-roads.com
            > > Snail mail at: 711 Nob Hill Trail - Franktown,CO USA - 80116-8717
            > > phone:+1.303.660.9400 fax:+1.303.660.9217
            > > member: Association of Professional Genealogists & National
            > Genealogical
            > > Society
            > > __________________________________________________________
            > > "It’s always useful to know where a friend-and-relation is,
            > whether you
            > > want him or whether you don’t."
            > > Rabbit, Pooh’s Little Instruction Book (Winnie the Pooh)
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > On Thu, 2011-02-24 at 08:29 -0500, Michael Maher wrote:
            > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > I'm not sure if my area of interest fits into your expertise... My
            > > > interest
            > > > is in learning the whys and hows of migration to the US from the
            > > > German
            > > > kingdoms/duchies in what is now northern Bavaria. My maternal
            > > > g-grandparents left the Saxe-Coburg region (tiny village of
            > > > Firmelsdorf) in
            > > > the mid-1850s and went to Mendota, Illinois. The other maternal
            > side
            > > > left
            > > > Luxembourg at about the same time and also went to Mendota. Both
            > told
            > > > the
            > > > enumerator on the 1860 census that they were from Prussia. I am
            > > > interested
            > > > in why they left their countries of origin, why they went to
            > Illinois,
            > > > and
            > > > why they both said Prussia??? In later censuses both families (at
            > > > least
            > > > their children) then told the enumerators "Luxembourg" and
            > > > "Saxe-Coburg"
            > > > (with assorted spellings). The surnames of interest are Jacob[s]
            > and
            > > > Reiter. If this is something you have knowledge of, I would
            > appreciate
            > > > any
            > > > leads in the right direction (I do not speak or read German).
            > Thanks
            > > > in
            > > > advance for any assistance.
            > > >
            > > > Mike
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.