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Need Research Ideas

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  • shannonlind
    Where to turn??? I m banging my head against a brick wall and I need some new ideas…. Where do you turn when a family seems to have left no records? I have
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 6, 2010
      Where to turn???

      I'm banging my head against a brick wall and I need some new ideas….

      Where do you turn when a family seems to have left no records? I have a family that shows up in the 1850 census. The HOH is a shoemaker and they have no real estate value listed (assuming that they own no real estate). The other members of the household are his wife and a small son. I haven't been able to find them in any other censuses.

      The son shows up in his own household in the 1870 census with a wife, a son, and a stepson. The HOH is a railroad laborer and, again, seemingly owns no property. This family is on the 1880 census with an additional child and the wife's mother living with them. The father is still a railroad worker and no real estate is noted.

      In 1900, his son shows up in a household as a house painter who is renting a house. This information remains essentially the same until the 1920 census when the census indicates that the family now owns a home.

      So, I've got two full generations that have no property to their names. They show up in limited censuses, and they lived before vital records were recorded in a central location. I have searched for wills/probate records (briefly) but haven't found any. I assume it's because there was no land/property to pass on?

      What's my next step? What other records should I be searching?

      Any ideas MUCH appreciated!
    • kay f
      Here are a couple of ideas that might work. 1. If you don t have paid subscription to Ancestry.com for home use, go to the library where you can use theirs.
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 7, 2010
        Here are a couple of ideas that might work. 1. If you don't have paid subscription to Ancestry.com for home use, go to the library where you can use theirs. Look for City Directories. 2. Try reading local histories of the city from that time period also, you can usually find them on Heritage Quest, also through your library. Google Books may also have some Local History records as well. 3. Post on genealogy message boards with names and dates, you will be surprised who might have information. 4. Check cemetery records at findagrave.com checking for families buried in the same cemetery, many are now cross-linked to show family association.5. footnote.com is also good source for information. They are now owned by Ancestry.com so there will be fees but sometimes they run free specials. I don't know if the libraries are now offering access to this as well as ancestry.com.

        --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "shannonlind" <sdlind@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Where to turn???
        >
        > I'm banging my head against a brick wall and I need some new ideas….
        >
        > Where do you turn when a family seems to have left no records? I have a family that shows up in the 1850 census. The HOH is a shoemaker and they have no real estate value listed (assuming that they own no real estate). The other members of the household are his wife and a small son. I haven't been able to find them in any other censuses.
        .....................
        >message stripped
        >
        >
        > Any ideas MUCH appreciated!
        >
      • flints
        Look at your history lessons. You may never be able to find this family for the 1860 time frame. The country was in turmoil with the civil war (and events
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 7, 2010
          Look at your history lessons. You may never be able to find
          this family for the 1860 time frame. The country was in
          turmoil with the civil war (and events leading up to it),
          and some intentionally didn't want to be found or kept a low
          profile (were they helping runaway slaves? or other reasons
          to keep off the government's "radar") Sometimes sickness
          took the whole family out (I've a brother-in-law who's dad
          grew up w/his grandparents and no other family members...FT
          Knox, KY, 1917 time frame...looking at history, I'm thinking
          influenza killed off his family.) Sometimes we won't know
          for sure, but looking at historical events can give us a
          "guestimate"

          Another thought...look for wierd spellings the census worker
          might have used. A name in our family tree was Crottier. I
          finally found it under "Groateer"

          Liz in VA
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: shannonlind
          To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, November 06, 2010 12:20 PM
          Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Need Research Ideas




          Where to turn???

          I'm banging my head against a brick wall and I need some new
          ideas….

          Where do you turn when a family seems to have left no
          records? I have a family that shows up in the 1850 census.
          The HOH is a shoemaker and they have no real estate value
          listed (assuming that they own no real estate). The other
          members of the household are his wife and a small son. I
          haven't been able to find them in any other censuses.

          The son shows up in his own household in the 1870 census
          with a wife, a son, and a stepson. The HOH is a railroad
          laborer and, again, seemingly owns no property. This family
          is on the 1880 census with an additional child and the
          wife's mother living with them. The father is still a
          railroad worker and no real estate is noted.

          In 1900, his son shows up in a household as a house painter
          who is renting a house. This information remains essentially
          the same until the 1920 census when the census indicates
          that the family now owns a home.

          So, I've got two full generations that have no property to
          their names. They show up in limited censuses, and they
          lived before vital records were recorded in a central
          location. I have searched for wills/probate records
          (briefly) but haven't found any. I assume it's because there
          was no land/property to pass on?

          What's my next step? What other records should I be
          searching?

          Any ideas MUCH appreciated!
        • Jenni
          Hi Guys!  How common or (uncommon I am sure) would it have been for a married couple to get a divorce in Arkansas (the south) during the 1860 s.  (at that
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 7, 2010
            Hi Guys!  How common or (uncommon I am sure) would it have been for a married
            couple to get a divorce in Arkansas (the south) during the 1860's.  (at that
            time they lived around the Helena, Phillips County, Arkansas area.)  It would
            have been between 1869-1870 time frame.  I realize that that is right in the
            midst of the Civil War, etc.  I really thought during that era it was considered
            a disgrace to get a divorce especially for the woman.  She would have been
            considered "loose" etc. 


            I am sure the records for divorces then are harder to research than any other
            records.  Probably non existent! : ( 

            Let me know what you think!

            Thanks!
            Jenni




            ________________________________
            From: flints <flints@...>
            To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sun, November 7, 2010 3:56:40 PM
            Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] RE: Need Research Ideas

             
            Look at your history lessons. You may never be able to find
            this family for the 1860 time frame. The country was in
            turmoil with the civil war (and events leading up to it),
            and some intentionally didn't want to be found or kept a low
            profile (were they helping runaway slaves? or other reasons
            to keep off the government's "radar") Sometimes sickness
            took the whole family out (I've a brother-in-law who's dad
            grew up w/his grandparents and no other family members...FT
            Knox, KY, 1917 time frame...looking at history, I'm thinking
            influenza killed off his family.) Sometimes we won't know
            for sure, but looking at historical events can give us a
            "guestimate"

            Another thought...look for wierd spellings the census worker
            might have used. A name in our family tree was Crottier. I
            finally found it under "Groateer"

            Liz in VA
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: shannonlind
            To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, November 06, 2010 12:20 PM
            Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Need Research Ideas

            Where to turn???

            I'm banging my head against a brick wall and I need some new
            ideas….

            Where do you turn when a family seems to have left no
            records? I have a family that shows up in the 1850 census.
            The HOH is a shoemaker and they have no real estate value
            listed (assuming that they own no real estate). The other
            members of the household are his wife and a small son. I
            haven't been able to find them in any other censuses.

            The son shows up in his own household in the 1870 census
            with a wife, a son, and a stepson. The HOH is a railroad
            laborer and, again, seemingly owns no property. This family
            is on the 1880 census with an additional child and the
            wife's mother living with them. The father is still a
            railroad worker and no real estate is noted.

            In 1900, his son shows up in a household as a house painter
            who is renting a house. This information remains essentially
            the same until the 1920 census when the census indicates
            that the family now owns a home.

            So, I've got two full generations that have no property to
            their names. They show up in limited censuses, and they
            lived before vital records were recorded in a central
            location. I have searched for wills/probate records
            (briefly) but haven't found any. I assume it's because there
            was no land/property to pass on?

            What's my next step? What other records should I be
            searching?

            Any ideas MUCH appreciated!




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • s
            not non existant. would u like to share who u r looking for so we can look? sunny From: Jenni Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2010 4:56 PM To:
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 8, 2010
              not non existant.
              would u like to share who u r looking for so we can look?
              sunny


              From: Jenni
              Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2010 4:56 PM
              To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com ; flint326@... ; southern_states@yahoogroups.com ; ardrew-L@... ; ARPHILLI-L@... ; genealogy ; ARKANSAS-QUERIES-L@... ; Carl Robert Coe ; Inc. Polk County Genealogical Society ; AFHA-BOARD-L@... ; AGS-L@... ; arkansas-queries-request@... ; arkansas-queries@...
              Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Divorce in the 1860's?


              Hi Guys! How common or (uncommon I am sure) would it have been for a married
              couple to get a divorce in Arkansas (the south) during the 1860's. (at that
              time they lived around the Helena, Phillips County, Arkansas area.) It would
              have been between 1869-1870 time frame. I realize that that is right in the
              midst of the Civil War, etc. I really thought during that era it was considered
              a disgrace to get a divorce especially for the woman. She would have been
              considered "loose" etc.


              I am sure the records for divorces then are harder to research than any other
              records. Probably non existent! : (

              Let me know what you think!

              Thanks!
              Jenni




              ________________________________
              From: flints <flints@...>
              To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sun, November 7, 2010 3:56:40 PM
              Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] RE: Need Research Ideas


              Look at your history lessons. You may never be able to find
              this family for the 1860 time frame. The country was in
              turmoil with the civil war (and events leading up to it),
              and some intentionally didn't want to be found or kept a low
              profile (were they helping runaway slaves? or other reasons
              to keep off the government's "radar") Sometimes sickness
              took the whole family out (I've a brother-in-law who's dad
              grew up w/his grandparents and no other family members...FT
              Knox, KY, 1917 time frame...looking at history, I'm thinking
              influenza killed off his family.) Sometimes we won't know
              for sure, but looking at historical events can give us a
              "guestimate"

              Another thought...look for wierd spellings the census worker
              might have used. A name in our family tree was Crottier. I
              finally found it under "Groateer"

              Liz in VA
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: shannonlind
              To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, November 06, 2010 12:20 PM
              Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Need Research Ideas

              Where to turn???

              I'm banging my head against a brick wall and I need some new
              ideas….

              Where do you turn when a family seems to have left no
              records? I have a family that shows up in the 1850 census.
              The HOH is a shoemaker and they have no real estate value
              listed (assuming that they own no real estate). The other
              members of the household are his wife and a small son. I
              haven't been able to find them in any other censuses.

              The son shows up in his own household in the 1870 census
              with a wife, a son, and a stepson. The HOH is a railroad
              laborer and, again, seemingly owns no property. This family
              is on the 1880 census with an additional child and the
              wife's mother living with them. The father is still a
              railroad worker and no real estate is noted.

              In 1900, his son shows up in a household as a house painter
              who is renting a house. This information remains essentially
              the same until the 1920 census when the census indicates
              that the family now owns a home.

              So, I've got two full generations that have no property to
              their names. They show up in limited censuses, and they
              lived before vital records were recorded in a central
              location. I have searched for wills/probate records
              (briefly) but haven't found any. I assume it's because there
              was no land/property to pass on?

              What's my next step? What other records should I be
              searching?

              Any ideas MUCH appreciated!




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

              Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com

              http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718


              Yahoo! Groups Links





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • s
              I have some records I can search. Are you positive of the decade? I noticed Coe in your email addy; is that the last name u r looking into? If so, are they
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 8, 2010
                I have some records I can search.
                Are you positive of the decade?
                I noticed "Coe" in your email addy; is that the last name u r looking into?
                If so, are they Coe, John S vs nancy J. ?
                Thanks
                Sunny




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jean S
                Also, in some states there are the state census records (sometimes called state tax rolls). These are short census that are taken for the state s statistics
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 8, 2010
                  Also, in some states there are the state census records (sometimes called state tax rolls). These are short census that are taken for the state's statistics and other things, but they are done "on the 5's".. ie: 2005, 2015 etc...
                  This is how I was, finally, able to narrow down when GGGM-in-law was committed to an in Topeka State Hospital and was able to obtain some records (sterilized), and copies of a few letters from other family members to both her and her doctor. It actually states on her release papers "Paroled", so we know that the family story was probably true.

                  Anyway, here is one of the links to check to see if the state you need has any records (both available to the public and if that state/county had digitalized it and put it online for public viewing:

                  http://publicrecords.netronline.com/default.aspx

                  There are many other ways to find out if the state/county/city (town?) has any public records and that they are available online..
                  One way is to check thru Cindi's List (http://cyndislist.com/), find the area in question and see if there was a tax list/assessors/ State Census (Kansas State Census started 1855, for instance).

                  Just a thought.

                  Happy wall banging!! The more you bang the more likeliy something will fall out! Just think about the joys when you can stop banging because you broke throu that wall! I know I was estatic when I confirmed that GGGM was committed to that hospital!. lol

                  If you do not have Ancestry.com, you can either go for their 14-day free trial (if you haven't already done that!) or let me know and I'll be more than happy to check to see if anything is there. I will need a few more of the details.. like: the specific dates and places that are known or suspected)

                  Jean

                  --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "kay f" <kay_fredricks@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Here are a couple of ideas that might work. 1. If you don't have paid subscription to Ancestry.com for home use, go to the library where you can use theirs. Look for City Directories. 2. Try reading local histories of the city from that time period also, you can usually find them on Heritage Quest, also through your library. Google Books may also have some Local History records as well. 3. Post on genealogy message boards with names and dates, you will be surprised who might have information. 4. Check cemetery records at findagrave.com checking for families buried in the same cemetery, many are now cross-linked to show family association.5. footnote.com is also good source for information. They are now owned by Ancestry.com so there will be fees but sometimes they run free specials. I don't know if the libraries are now offering access to this as well as ancestry.com.
                  >
                  > --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "shannonlind" <sdlind@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Where to turn???
                  > >
                  > > I'm banging my head against a brick wall and I need some new ideas….
                  > >
                  > > Where do you turn when a family seems to have left no records? I have a family that shows up in the 1850 census. The HOH is a shoemaker and they have no real estate value listed (assuming that they own no real estate). The other members of the household are his wife and a small son. I haven't been able to find them in any other censuses.
                  > .....................
                  > >message stripped
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Any ideas MUCH appreciated!
                  > >
                  >
                • Jenni
                  Hi Sunny,   No the names are very different.  But good try!  You sound like me trying to search for any clue I can get!! : )   Here is the info-   Nancy
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 9, 2010
                    Hi Sunny,
                      No the names are very different.  But good try!  You sound like me trying to
                    search for any clue I can get!! : )
                      Here is the info-   Nancy J. Berry Bankston Rogers (or Rodgers) married to
                    Joseph Rogers /Rodgers.  (I have never seen them together in any census in the
                    same household).
                      Nancy J. Rogers (Rodgers) is in the 1870 census of Phillips County, Arkansas
                    in Searcy Township aged 24 with her 2 children.  By themselves.  The children
                    are Ida aged 4 and Berry aged around 6 months.  Nancy is stated to be a farmer. 
                    Nancy J. Rogers (Rodgers) are and 2 children are all born in Arkansas.
                      Ok-  on the SAME Census about 10 lines down in a totally different household
                    there IS a Joseph Rogers farmer aged 29 with 2 single males also in their 20's. 
                    The 2 single males are from Germany (or somewhere like that I can't
                    remember.)  The 2 single males are laborers. 

                      S0- if this Joseph Rogers (Rodgers) IS her husband what is the deal with him
                    living in a totally separate household as the head of house hold???  (My Rogers
                    ancestors drive me crazy- they really do not like to give up information very
                    easily! LOL
                      Thanks Sunny for trying to help.  
                      Jenni : )
                     



                    ________________________________
                    From: s <circa_1948@...>
                    To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Mon, November 8, 2010 4:39:14 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Genealogy Research Club] Divorce in the 1860's?

                     
                    I have some records I can search.
                    Are you positive of the decade?
                    I noticed "Coe" in your email addy; is that the last name u r looking into?
                    If so, are they Coe, John S vs nancy J. ?
                    Thanks
                    Sunny

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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