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Re: [Genealogy Research Club] A Rather Strange Question

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  • Pamela Gray
    Barb,   Not a strange question at all.   I personally would add them to my tree.  Just because we would rather not mention them does not mean that they do
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 4, 2010
      Barb,
       
      Not a strange question at all.
       
      I personally would add them to my tree.  Just because we would rather not mention them does not mean that they do not exist.  You don't have to state what they are incarcerated for, but remember, the information is public.  One of my husbands relatives was recently incarcerated and I went online and found out everything, where this person was at, what this person was convicted of, how long the sentence is, there was a picture, and much more. 
       
      We all have skeletons in our closets.  My 4x great grandmother on my fathers side was one the first women to be convicted of murder in Oregon and one of only two women women in prison at the time.  So not very nice.
       
      Anyway, If you don't want to add them, don't.  As I am only doing my direct ancestry at this time, and the person is not in my direct line, I add the name and dates, but not much detail.  Maybe later I will do so.
       
      Pam

      --- On Thu, 11/4/10, Barb Chandler <barb95831@...> wrote:


      From: Barb Chandler <barb95831@...>
      Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] A Rather Strange Question
      To: "Genealogy Research Club" <genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Thursday, November 4, 2010, 9:03 AM


       



      'I'm sure we all have some skeletons in our family closets that we'd
      rather not have unearthed, but the fact remains, no matter how painful
      or how much we want to disown them, they do have a way of resurfacing.
      So my question is this....regarding a family member that is
      incarcerated....should that info be included in the family tree? Maybe
      not all of the details such as the offense, etc. but the name and
      location of the facility, the DC number and such. I mean, when a person
      enters prison, they basically fall off the face of the earth until
      either their release or their death, and maybe years now the road, this
      info would help the next researcher. I just wanted your opinion on this
      delicate matter and how is the best way to handle the information.'

      Like you said in years to come the information may be of help to the next
      researcher. I'd definitely include where the information on the person.

      Barb

      --
      Traveling Through The Generations;
      http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbc46/<http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/%7Ebarbc46/>

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Angelee
      Barb, are you related to any of the Dutton s from Kentucky who went west? My line were Brethern (aka Dunkards) and they were not allowed to marry outside the
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 5, 2010
        Barb, are you related to any of the Dutton's from Kentucky who went west? My line were Brethern (aka Dunkards) and they were not allowed to marry outside the faith. Many of these Anabaptist sects went into Pennsylvania for religious freedom and later moved.

        My family has many skeletons, including the "Rose Gang" of Kentucky and Southwestern Virginia. It is what it is.


        Angelee Mullins Fynan



        --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "Barbara D" <bbrill@...> wrote:

        > I was investigating Dutton ancestors when I discovered the family tree of the branch of the Duttons who settled in Pennsylvania. Imagine my surprise to learn that the father disowned four or five of his children for reasons we today would consider very petty indeed. One brother was disowned who had married a person of the Catholic faith, as was his brother who stood up as a witness for him at the wedding, and a sister who attended the wedding.
        >
        > Another son was disowned for playing a game of chance.
        >
        > Yet another for accruing some debts.
        >
        > Life was really hard.
        >
        > Barbara D. Brill
        >
      • Jean
        When one starts to research their ancestry, one will discover many skeletons in the closets whose behaviour in their day were not acceptable to their peers,
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 5, 2010
          When one starts to research their ancestry, one will discover many skeletons in the closets whose behaviour in their day were not acceptable to their peers, but is not the reason we begin, is to understand our past & learn from it?
          Record everything you have verified be careful not to record family prejudices. even down to the colour they preferred if known it will be treasured in generations to come without judgement.
          I would have nothing if I was judgemental as some of my ancestors were transported for stealing & what was recorded as rape & murder of his good woman but I have since verified it was not as it all seemed.
          record how many times they sneezed in a day, if you know that!!!!


          From: Pamela Gray
          Sent: Friday, November 05, 2010 11:11 AM
          To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Genealogy Research Club] A Rather Strange Question


          Barb,

          Not a strange question at all.

          I personally would add them to my tree. Just because we would rather not mention them does not mean that they do not exist. You don't have to state what they are incarcerated for, but remember, the information is public. One of my husbands relatives was recently incarcerated and I went online and found out everything, where this person was at, what this person was convicted of, how long the sentence is, there was a picture, and much more.

          We all have skeletons in our closets. My 4x great grandmother on my fathers side was one the first women to be convicted of murder in Oregon and one of only two women women in prison at the time. So not very nice.

          Anyway, If you don't want to add them, don't. As I am only doing my direct ancestry at this time, and the person is not in my direct line, I add the name and dates, but not much detail. Maybe later I will do so.

          Pam

          --- On Thu, 11/4/10, Barb Chandler <mailto:barb95831%40gmail.com> wrote:

          From: Barb Chandler <mailto:barb95831%40gmail.com>
          Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] A Rather Strange Question
          To: "Genealogy Research Club" <mailto:genealogyresearchclub%40yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Thursday, November 4, 2010, 9:03 AM



          'I'm sure we all have some skeletons in our family closets that we'd
          rather not have unearthed, but the fact remains, no matter how painful
          or how much we want to disown them, they do have a way of resurfacing.
          So my question is this....regarding a family member that is
          incarcerated....should that info be included in the family tree? Maybe
          not all of the details such as the offense, etc. but the name and
          location of the facility, the DC number and such. I mean, when a person
          enters prison, they basically fall off the face of the earth until
          either their release or their death, and maybe years now the road, this
          info would help the next researcher. I just wanted your opinion on this
          delicate matter and how is the best way to handle the information.'

          Like you said in years to come the information may be of help to the next
          researcher. I'd definitely include where the information on the person.

          Barb

          --
          Traveling Through The Generations;
          http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbc46/<http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/%7Ebarbc46/>

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Barbara D
          ... Oh, thanks for asking, Angelee. So far as I can tell, I m not. My Dutton ancestors lived in Massachusetts, and then in Vermont briefly before coming to
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 6, 2010
            --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "Angelee" <omoonbeam@...> wrote:
            >
            > Barb, are you related to any of the Dutton's from Kentucky who went west? <


            Oh, thanks for asking, Angelee. So far as I can tell, I'm not.

            My Dutton ancestors lived in Massachusetts, and then in Vermont briefly before coming to western NY state.


            >
            > My family has many skeletons, including the "Rose Gang"
            > of Kentucky and Southwestern Virginia. It is what it is. <



            But these side trips we find make the genealogy searches so much more interesting than they would have been otherwise.


            I was reading about a branch of the Duttons who settled in Hartford, VT. They were dirt poor and suffered immense hardships.

            I, too, lived in Vermont for about 12 years. Vermont is tough enough when one has good shelter, heat, and nutritious food to eat. My hubby and I also had ease of transportation and good medical care.

            Imagine trying to till the soil, as the earliest settlers did, and to raise sufficient food during very, very short growing seasons. The suffering must have been immense.

            Barbara Dutton Brill
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