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ellis island ?

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  • raph_godillot
    hello I m looking for informations about the father and the uncle of my grand father. I have found informations about POMI Guiseppe F. who arrived in 1902 at
    Message 1 of 16 , May 31, 2010
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      hello
      I'm looking for informations about the father and the uncle of my grand father. I have found informations about POMI Guiseppe F. who arrived in 1902 at Ellis Island. It seems that he wanted to see his broter Guiseppe POMI at Pittsburg. I have never been able to find when Guiseppe POMI arrived in USA : who can help me about this first question ? Did he arrived with others members of his family ? ...

      Then, does il exist papers or others documents about people who arrived at Ellis Island ? How to see them ? The problem is than Guiseppe F. was supposed to be in France in 1902 and not in a boat to USA ! That's why I would like to understand ... if it is possible.

      Sorry for my poor english, thank you very much for any help

      Raphaëlle (France)
    • dsanfilippo303@comcast.net
      Hello Raphaëlle - Having spent many hours searching the Ellis Island records for my husband s family I do know that they are pretty much intact and correct
      Message 2 of 16 , May 31, 2010
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        Hello Raphaëlle -



        Having spent many hours searching the Ellis Island records for my husband's family I do know that they are pretty much intact and correct except for the spelling of 'different' names by the clerks taking the information - you will find a lot of misspellings and some incredibly wrong names such as one man I know whose surname was Buttermark - however his father's true name was Abbutamarco and the clerk could not spell it, so the new name of Buttermark was born. It might be useful to check out the 'wall' of the names of those who donated a brick to the Ellis Island fund - I know I was going to print a list of the Sanfilippo names for my father-in-law and there were about 30 or 40 pages of the name Sanfilippo. Just because it is unusual in America does not mean it is in the 'mother country'.



        Before Ellis Island opened the immigrants came in through another port whose name slips my mind but in 1906 Ellis Island was in full swing. Are you sure he came in through Ellis Island because there was a port in Philadelpia. I am afraid that I am not very knowledgeable about Ellis Island except for the time I spent on looking for my husband's family since I don't think that any of my ancestors, except one, arrived after the American Revolution.



        By the way, on this Memorial Day, thanks for your help - France came through for the young and struggling county.



        Diane Stark Sanfilippo




        hello
        I'm looking for informations about the father and the uncle of my grand father. I have found informations about POMI Guiseppe F. who arrived in 1902 at Ellis Island. It seems that he wanted to see his broter Guiseppe POMI at Pittsburg. I have never been able to find when Guiseppe POMI arrived in USA : who can help me about this first question ? Did he arrived with others members of his family ? ...

        Then, does il exist papers or others documents about people who arrived at Ellis Island ? How to see them ? The problem is than Guiseppe F. was supposed to be in France in 1902 and not in a boat to USA ! That's why I would like to understand ... if it is possible.

        Sorry for my poor english, thank you very much for any help

        Raphaëlle (France)



        ------------------------------------

        Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com

        http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718


        Yahoo! Groups Links





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Pamela Gray
        Raphaëlle,   Here is a website link to Ellis Island arrivals.  This link should get you to the page that lists all Pomi immigrants/arrivals at Ellis Island.
        Message 3 of 16 , May 31, 2010
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          Raphaëlle,
           
          Here is a website link to Ellis Island arrivals.  This link should get you to the page that lists all Pomi immigrants/arrivals at Ellis Island.
           
          http://www.ellisisland.org/search/matchMore.asp?LNM=POMI&PLNM=POMI&kind=exact&offset=0&dwpdone=1
           
          On this page there were two Giuseppe Pomi that arrived at Ellis Island.  First arrived in 1899, he was 47 at the time of arrival, the other was Giuseppe F. Pomi that arrived in 1902.
           
          Also, there are other ports that your relatives may have arrived at besides Ellis Island.  Don't know where the records are, but I am sure someone else here does.
           
          Sorry not much help.
           
          Pamela




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Peakcat@aol.com
          Raphaelle: You might try Stevemorse.org. He has a terrific site that has an Ellis Island site and the other place people came in was Castle Garden which is
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 1, 2010
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            Raphaelle:

            You might try Stevemorse.org. He has a terrific site that has an Ellis
            Island site and the other place people came in was Castle Garden which is also
            downtown NY. Castle Garden was used until everyone starting coming in to
            Ellis Island. His site is also free and contains a tremendous information.
            You also might play around with the spelling of the names you are looking for
            since they were spelled either the way they sounded or the way either the
            immigrant or inspector thought they were spelled.

            Good luck.

            Ina Getzoff
            _Peakcat@..._ (mailto:Peakcat@...)




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • barbara erickson
            One of the other places to check is www.castlegarden.org it was open from 1855-1924. I hope it helps. Barb ________________________________ From:
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 1, 2010
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              One of the other places to check is www.castlegarden.org it was open from 1855-1924. I hope it helps. Barb





              ________________________________
              From: "dsanfilippo303@..." <dsanfilippo303@...>
              To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, May 31, 2010 11:46:13 PM
              Subject: Re: [Genealogy Research Club] ellis island ?




              Hello Raphaëlle -

              Having spent many hours searching the Ellis Island records for my husband's family I do know that they are pretty much intact and correct except for the spelling of 'different' names by the clerks taking the information - you will find a lot of misspellings and some incredibly wrong names such as one man I know whose surname was Buttermark - however his father's true name was Abbutamarco and the clerk could not spell it, so the new name of Buttermark was born. It might be useful to check out the 'wall' of the names of those who donated a brick to the Ellis Island fund - I know I was going to print a list of the Sanfilippo names for my father-in-law and there were about 30 or 40 pages of the name Sanfilippo. Just because it is unusual in America does not mean it is in the 'mother country'.

              Before Ellis Island opened the immigrants came in through another port whose name slips my mind but in 1906 Ellis Island was in full swing. Are you sure he came in through Ellis Island because there was a port in Philadelpia. I am afraid that I am not very knowledgeable about Ellis Island except for the time I spent on looking for my husband's family since I don't think that any of my ancestors, except one, arrived after the American Revolution.

              By the way, on this Memorial Day, thanks for your help - France came through for the young and struggling county.

              Diane Stark Sanfilippo

              hello
              I'm looking for informations about the father and the uncle of my grand father. I have found informations about POMI Guiseppe F. who arrived in 1902 at Ellis Island. It seems that he wanted to see his broter Guiseppe POMI at Pittsburg. I have never been able to find when Guiseppe POMI arrived in USA : who can help me about this first question ? Did he arrived with others members of his family ? ...

              Then, does il exist papers or others documents about people who arrived at Ellis Island ? How to see them ? The problem is than Guiseppe F. was supposed to be in France in 1902 and not in a boat to USA ! That's why I would like to understand ... if it is possible.

              Sorry for my poor english, thank you very much for any help

              Raphaëlle (France)

              ------------------------------------

              Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com

              http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718

              Yahoo! Groups Links

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Joy Weaver
              I see repeated here the idea that the clerks at Ellis Island changed people s names. No. The names you see on the manifests were written by ship s personnel
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 2, 2010
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                I see repeated here the idea that the clerks at Ellis Island changed
                people's names.

                No. The names you see on the manifests were written by ship's personnel
                at the port of departure from lists of ticket purchasers. That's why
                you will see names crossed out. Those are people who never boarded the
                ship after buying the ticket. (Maybe they arrived at the port late due
                to travel problems, etc.)

                People changed their own names after arrival or before boarding, but
                Ellis Island clerks had nothing to do with it. Perhaps some stuck with
                the spelling on the manifest because it was easier or because they
                didn't know how to read or write their own names. Let's not forget that
                millions of immigrants were illiterate or at least illiterate in English.

                That said, yes some of the misspellings were horrendous and even when
                the spelling was ok, the handwriting of the ship's purser or whoever
                wrote the lists was illegible to the people who transcribed them for the
                Ellis Island website. My own favorite was a woman named Grunfeld who is
                indexed as Ojrunfeld. If she hadn't been traveling with her
                sister-in-law whose name I recognized, I'd never have found her.

                Joy Weaver



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Louise
                My husband s grandparents all came through Ellis Island and their names were changed there..they, themselves, did not change them. The names were not totally
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 2, 2010
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                  My husband's grandparents all came through Ellis Island and their names were changed there..they, themselves, did not change them. The names were not totally changed, but had a letter eliminated or had the last two letters switched and it was done by the person who recorded it, NOT by the persons themselves. Oh, and they all spoke English well enough to have hurt feelings when this was done to their names, which all had meanings and they took pride in. Maybe you had to be there to know.





                  Never forget that there is always a blue sky and shining sun above the darkest clouds.









                  --- On Wed, 6/2/10, Joy Weaver <joyweave@...> wrote:


                  From: Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
                  Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Re: ellis island ?
                  To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 7:28 AM


                   



                  I see repeated here the idea that the clerks at Ellis Island changed
                  people's names.

                  No. The names you see on the manifests were written by ship's personnel
                  at the port of departure from lists of ticket purchasers. That's why
                  you will see names crossed out. Those are people who never boarded the
                  ship after buying the ticket. (Maybe they arrived at the port late due
                  to travel problems, etc.)

                  People changed their own names after arrival or before boarding, but
                  Ellis Island clerks had nothing to do with it. Perhaps some stuck with
                  the spelling on the manifest because it was easier or because they
                  didn't know how to read or write their own names. Let's not forget that
                  millions of immigrants were illiterate or at least illiterate in English.

                  That said, yes some of the misspellings were horrendous and even when
                  the spelling was ok, the handwriting of the ship's purser or whoever
                  wrote the lists was illegible to the people who transcribed them for the
                  Ellis Island website. My own favorite was a woman named Grunfeld who is
                  indexed as Ojrunfeld. If she hadn't been traveling with her
                  sister-in-law whose name I recognized, I'd never have found her.

                  Joy Weaver

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • TinaS
                  Names are changed for many different reasons. Some who came to the US did change their names to be more American. They choose their own names. I know this
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 2, 2010
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                    Names are changed for many different reasons. Some who came to the US did change their names to be more American. They choose their own names. I know this because my husband's grandmother did this. I could find all of her records here in the US but could not find them in Holland. After talking to her, I finally found her birth record in Holland because I had her Dutch name. When my husband and I wanted to give our daughter a Dutch name, she became upset. She said she came to the US to be American and that we were to give our daughter an American name. Period.

                    Others came to the US and had their names changed by the person who was recording the information. This could result from accents, lack of English language, pure laziness, or handwriting. Of course, there can be many more reasons. You must remember what Ellis Island was like. It is not like going through customs now.

                    All females at the time had to be escorted. So they had to either be traveling with a male relative or be picked up by a male relative. They were horded through many passages like cattle after a long journey on the sea. There were seen by doctors to make sure they were not sick. They ran the risk of being turned away at the whim of people working there. Most just wanted to get through as fast as is possible so many felt hurt when names were changed but would never have spoken up in fear of being turned away. They had a dream of a better life her in America and just wanted to get started.

                    Hope this helps in understanding that there are many reasons why names are changed.


                    Tina

                    --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, Louise <glwrose@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > My husband's grandparents all came through Ellis Island and their names were changed there..they, themselves, did not change them. The names were not totally changed, but had a letter eliminated or had the last two letters switched and it was done by the person who recorded it, NOT by the persons themselves. Oh, and they all spoke English well enough to have hurt feelings when this was done to their names, which all had meanings and they took pride in. Maybe you had to be there to know.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Never forget that there is always a blue sky and shining sun above the darkest clouds.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Wed, 6/2/10, Joy Weaver <joyweave@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > From: Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
                    > Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Re: ellis island ?
                    > To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 7:28 AM
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I see repeated here the idea that the clerks at Ellis Island changed
                    > people's names.
                    >
                    > No. The names you see on the manifests were written by ship's personnel
                    > at the port of departure from lists of ticket purchasers. That's why
                    > you will see names crossed out. Those are people who never boarded the
                    > ship after buying the ticket. (Maybe they arrived at the port late due
                    > to travel problems, etc.)
                    >
                    > People changed their own names after arrival or before boarding, but
                    > Ellis Island clerks had nothing to do with it. Perhaps some stuck with
                    > the spelling on the manifest because it was easier or because they
                    > didn't know how to read or write their own names. Let's not forget that
                    > millions of immigrants were illiterate or at least illiterate in English.
                    >
                    > That said, yes some of the misspellings were horrendous and even when
                    > the spelling was ok, the handwriting of the ship's purser or whoever
                    > wrote the lists was illegible to the people who transcribed them for the
                    > Ellis Island website. My own favorite was a woman named Grunfeld who is
                    > indexed as Ojrunfeld. If she hadn't been traveling with her
                    > sister-in-law whose name I recognized, I'd never have found her.
                    >
                    > Joy Weaver
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Walter Palmer
                    ... My mother s father had his name changed by a teacher when he was in school He spelled it Boos and she told him it was Boose . The name is spelled both
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 2, 2010
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                      On Jun 2, 2010, at 11:00 AM, Louise wrote:

                      > My husband's grandparents all came through Ellis Island and their names were changed there..they, themselves, did not change them. The names were not totally changed, but had a letter eliminated or had the last two letters switched and it was done by the person who recorded it, NOT by the persons themselves. Oh, and they all spoke English well enough to have hurt feelings when this was done to their names, which all had meanings and they took pride in. Maybe you had to be there to know.
                      >
                      >
                      My mother's father had his name changed by a teacher when he was in school He spelled it 'Boos' and she told him it was 'Boose'. The name is spelled both ways by his ancestors, sometimes by the same ancestor. They came from Basel, Switzerland and the name, in both forms, is extremely common. Grandpa was a fourth generation American - it's never too late.

                      I am an attorney and used to volunteer helping people in Cook County, IL change their names. You haven't lived until you have sat across a desk from a 70 year old named "Boy Child --------". It's all coming out in the wash because they were given a 'proper' name after they left the hospital and have used it all their lives. Now they are applying for Social Security and passports. Things have become expensive in a post 9/11 world because they have to harmonize the name on the birth certificate with the name in the Social Security records. Government on all levels wants to use the exact name on the birth certificate.
                    • DABennink
                      More likely than not, the name was misspelled on the ship s manifest and the Ellis Island clerks used that spelling, as they were instructed to do. It was
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 2, 2010
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                        More likely than not, the name was misspelled on the ship's manifest and the Ellis Island clerks used that spelling, as they were instructed to do. It was possible to have the misspelling corrected if one was adamant enough and made the concerted effort.. I am old enough to have known plenty of relatives and friends who came through there and when there was a name change issue, that was the problem. I have absolutely never spoken to a soul who had their name changed against their will by a clerk at Ellis Island. I had extensive conversations with a group of my grandmother's relatives and friends who came over here in the 20's about this very topic. They WERE there.

                        Dawn


                        From: Louise
                        Sent: Wednesday, June 02, 2010 12:00 PM
                        To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [Genealogy Research Club] Re: ellis island ?



                        My husband's grandparents all came through Ellis Island and their names were changed there..they, themselves, did not change them. The names were not totally changed, but had a letter eliminated or had the last two letters switched and it was done by the person who recorded it, NOT by the persons themselves. Oh, and they all spoke English well enough to have hurt feelings when this was done to their names, which all had meanings and they took pride in. Maybe you had to be there to know.


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Joseph
                        Does anyone have the website address for Ellis Island records? Joy, I knew Weaver s in Hagerstown, Maryland, and also here in Baxter County, Arkansas. One is
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 2, 2010
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                          Does anyone have the website address for Ellis Island records?

                          Joy, I knew Weaver's in Hagerstown, Maryland, and also here in Baxter
                          County, Arkansas. One is one of our town's deputies.

                          Joseph



                          On 6/2/2010 7:28 AM, Joy Weaver wrote:
                          > I see repeated here the idea that the clerks at Ellis Island changed
                          > people's names.
                          >
                          > No. The names you see on the manifests were written by ship's personnel
                          > at the port of departure from lists of ticket purchasers. That's why
                          > you will see names crossed out. Those are people who never boarded the
                          > ship after buying the ticket. (Maybe they arrived at the port late due
                          > to travel problems, etc.)
                          >
                          > People changed their own names after arrival or before boarding, but
                          > Ellis Island clerks had nothing to do with it. Perhaps some stuck with
                          > the spelling on the manifest because it was easier or because they
                          > didn't know how to read or write their own names. Let's not forget that
                          > millions of immigrants were illiterate or at least illiterate in English.
                          >
                          > That said, yes some of the misspellings were horrendous and even when
                          > the spelling was ok, the handwriting of the ship's purser or whoever
                          > wrote the lists was illegible to the people who transcribed them for the
                          > Ellis Island website. My own favorite was a woman named Grunfeld who is
                          > indexed as Ojrunfeld. If she hadn't been traveling with her
                          > sister-in-law whose name I recognized, I'd never have found her.
                          >
                          > Joy Weaver
                          >
                        • Joy Weaver
                          This does not negate what I wrote, actually. The names were written at the port of departure, so that s where the spelling problem occurred. Your husband s
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jun 3, 2010
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                            This does not negate what I wrote, actually. The names were written at
                            the port of departure, so that's where the spelling problem occurred.
                            Your husband's grandparents would not likely have seen the manifest
                            until they landed and were being processed.

                            Joy



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Louise
                            My husband s grandfather always spelled his name correctly even though they had changed the last two letters. It was eventually spelled the incorrect way so
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jun 3, 2010
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                              My husband's grandfather always spelled his name correctly even though they had changed the last two letters. It was eventually spelled the incorrect way so long and by so many that the younger ones accepted the new spelling but all the grave monuments have the correct spelling as that is, in some tiny way,  their final victory over those who tried to change the lovely name which had great meanings.





                              Never forget that there is always a blue sky and shining sun above the darkest clouds.









                              --- On Wed, 6/2/10, Walter Palmer <walterpalmer@...> wrote:


                              From: Walter Palmer <walterpalmer@...>
                              Subject: Re: [Genealogy Research Club] Re: ellis island ?
                              To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 11:39 AM


                               




                              On Jun 2, 2010, at 11:00 AM, Louise wrote:

                              > My husband's grandparents all came through Ellis Island and their names were changed there..they, themselves, did not change them. The names were not totally changed, but had a letter eliminated or had the last two letters switched and it was done by the person who recorded it, NOT by the persons themselves. Oh, and they all spoke English well enough to have hurt feelings when this was done to their names, which all had meanings and they took pride in. Maybe you had to be there to know.
                              >
                              >
                              My mother's father had his name changed by a teacher when he was in school He spelled it 'Boos' and she told him it was 'Boose'. The name is spelled both ways by his ancestors, sometimes by the same ancestor. They came from Basel, Switzerland and the name, in both forms, is extremely common. Grandpa was a fourth generation American - it's never too late.

                              I am an attorney and used to volunteer helping people in Cook County, IL change their names. You haven't lived until you have sat across a desk from a 70 year old named "Boy Child --------". It's all coming out in the wash because they were given a 'proper' name after they left the hospital and have used it all their lives. Now they are applying for Social Security and passports. Things have become expensive in a post 9/11 world because they have to harmonize the name on the birth certificate with the name in the Social Security records. Government on all levels wants to use the exact name on the birth certificate.











                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Louise
                              AMEN! Never forget that there is always a blue sky and shining sun above the darkest clouds. ... From: TinaS Subject: [Genealogy Research
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jun 3, 2010
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                                AMEN!





                                Never forget that there is always a blue sky and shining sun above the darkest clouds.









                                --- On Wed, 6/2/10, TinaS <tolksteel@...> wrote:


                                From: TinaS <tolksteel@...>
                                Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Re: ellis island ?
                                To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 11:37 AM


                                 



                                Names are changed for many different reasons. Some who came to the US did change their names to be more American. They choose their own names. I know this because my husband's grandmother did this. I could find all of her records here in the US but could not find them in Holland. After talking to her, I finally found her birth record in Holland because I had her Dutch name. When my husband and I wanted to give our daughter a Dutch name, she became upset. She said she came to the US to be American and that we were to give our daughter an American name. Period.

                                Others came to the US and had their names changed by the person who was recording the information. This could result from accents, lack of English language, pure laziness, or handwriting. Of course, there can be many more reasons. You must remember what Ellis Island was like. It is not like going through customs now.

                                All females at the time had to be escorted. So they had to either be traveling with a male relative or be picked up by a male relative. They were horded through many passages like cattle after a long journey on the sea. There were seen by doctors to make sure they were not sick. They ran the risk of being turned away at the whim of people working there. Most just wanted to get through as fast as is possible so many felt hurt when names were changed but would never have spoken up in fear of being turned away. They had a dream of a better life her in America and just wanted to get started.

                                Hope this helps in understanding that there are many reasons why names are changed.

                                Tina

                                --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, Louise <glwrose@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > My husband's grandparents all came through Ellis Island and their names were changed there..they, themselves, did not change them. The names were not totally changed, but had a letter eliminated or had the last two letters switched and it was done by the person who recorded it, NOT by the persons themselves. Oh, and they all spoke English well enough to have hurt feelings when this was done to their names, which all had meanings and they took pride in. Maybe you had to be there to know.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Never forget that there is always a blue sky and shining sun above the darkest clouds.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --- On Wed, 6/2/10, Joy Weaver <joyweave@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                > From: Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
                                > Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Re: ellis island ?
                                > To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                                > Date: Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 7:28 AM
                                >
                                >
                                >  
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > I see repeated here the idea that the clerks at Ellis Island changed
                                > people's names.
                                >
                                > No. The names you see on the manifests were written by ship's personnel
                                > at the port of departure from lists of ticket purchasers. That's why
                                > you will see names crossed out. Those are people who never boarded the
                                > ship after buying the ticket. (Maybe they arrived at the port late due
                                > to travel problems, etc.)
                                >
                                > People changed their own names after arrival or before boarding, but
                                > Ellis Island clerks had nothing to do with it. Perhaps some stuck with
                                > the spelling on the manifest because it was easier or because they
                                > didn't know how to read or write their own names. Let's not forget that
                                > millions of immigrants were illiterate or at least illiterate in English.
                                >
                                > That said, yes some of the misspellings were horrendous and even when
                                > the spelling was ok, the handwriting of the ship's purser or whoever
                                > wrote the lists was illegible to the people who transcribed them for the
                                > Ellis Island website. My own favorite was a woman named Grunfeld who is
                                > indexed as Ojrunfeld. If she hadn't been traveling with her
                                > sister-in-law whose name I recognized, I'd never have found her.
                                >
                                > Joy Weaver
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >











                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Louise
                                I am going by what they told of their own experiences. These people were from different  areas and did not arrive here at the same time nor on the same
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jun 4, 2010
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                                  I am going by what they told of their own experiences. These people were from different  areas and did not arrive here at the same time nor on the same ship yet both families gave this account of the name changes happening once they got here. They said they were addressed by their correct names while on the ship so I have to believe what they said. I do not discount your knowledge but I also know we are all human and  when there are so many factors involved, different years, people who were at the departure points and here at Ellis Island, ships, etc, there will be more than oone story and they may all have validity to the particular person. it reminds me of the old parlor game where you start a sentence and pass it from person to person and by the time it gets back to the original person, not one word is the same as when it started.





                                  Never forget that there is always a blue sky and shining sun above the darkest clouds.









                                  --- On Thu, 6/3/10, Joy Weaver <joyweave@...> wrote:


                                  From: Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
                                  Subject: [Genealogy Research Club] Re: ellis island ?
                                  To: genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Thursday, June 3, 2010, 6:42 AM


                                   



                                  This does not negate what I wrote, actually. The names were written at
                                  the port of departure, so that's where the spelling problem occurred.
                                  Your husband's grandparents would not likely have seen the manifest
                                  until they landed and were being processed.

                                  Joy

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                                • Joy Weaver
                                  I agree that there were probably almost as many ways to change a name as there were people to do it. My posts were based on the information I have read on
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jun 5, 2010
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                                    I agree that there were probably almost as many ways to change a name as
                                    there were people to do it. My posts were based on the information I
                                    have read on several different sites about how the immigrants were
                                    listed and processed. A few links are copied below. They all say the
                                    same thing, essentially.

                                    Joy

                                    > http://genealogy.about.com/od/ellis_island/a/name_change.htm

                                    > http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/italian_genealogy/79248

                                    > http://www.genealogy.com/genealogy/88_donna.html

                                    > http://www.forward.com/articles/13017/






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