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Re: [Genealogy Research Club] Help with my dead end

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  • Micki
    Are all the Taylors the same, I come for Robert William, William Robert, William Robert, and back to Robert William. They had huge families, ten or more, I
    Message 1 of 16 , May 29, 2009
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      Are all the Taylors the same, I come for Robert William, William Robert, William Robert, and back to Robert William. They had huge families, ten or more, I know what you mean about using the same name over and over and breeding like rabbits! They came from England in the 1800's and landed in Utah and Idaho! Love'd your description of them.

      Micki




      - In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "Diane S" <dsanfilippo303@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Joseph -
      > Thanks... another 'link' to the Black Sheep club! I have so many now I don't know why I bother!
      > Oh, one of the Taylor men who migrated to Virginia, Dr. James Taylor, was the recipient of the first divorce in the Colonies! He had a 'fling' with his house servant while his 'new bride' was treated badly... so she left. Seems to be some kind of pattern in the 17th century men... but this family has been researched so much there are no secrets left, except the names of a few wives! Its said if you connect to a Taylor in Virginia, there is no doubt you are related to the family of John Taylor, original emigrant... father of Col. James Taylor. I have heard it said they bred like rabbits... and named their children all after each other, so keeping up with them is an awesome task. Many are related to this family but just can't find where their 'James, John, Mary, or Sarah' fit in! Its like the largest jigsaw puzzle in the world!
      > I am fortunate, I know where mine fit in... just not the names of the early wives.
      > Well, if he had meant 'strange'... why not say 'strange'... bad choice of words.
      > Anyone researching the Taylor's of Virginia can contact me... and, hopefully, I can help you sort fact from fiction!
      > Diane S
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I too find it interesting and historic, and even of great interest
      > (fascinating) that one would stick to their beliefs to the point of death.
      >
      > I'm wondering if Risk might have meant "funny" as in "peculiar" rather
      > than "funny" as in "humorous"....
      >
      > Interesting how much the way we say things can mean more than what we
      > say.... and eMail hide how we say it.
      >
      > Joseph
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Diane S wrote:
      > > Rick -
      > > I find your choice of words unusual.
      > > I don't really consider it 'funny' to be burned at the stake... I am sure that my 13th great-grandfather suffered before being struck on the head by a kind guard, thus killing him instantly.
      > > I find it 'interesting', and 'historic' since I enjoy learning the history of time and place of my ancestors in order to know them better, but martyrdom is not something most would seek. The Good Reverend Rowland Taylor was a 'hero', and died an honorable death... just not very funny.
      > > Diane S Sanfilippo
      > >
      > > This is terribly funny.
      > >
      > > I am researching for a friend of mine who's grandfather was a Taylor from Limestone, AL. His family comes from the Culpepper Co., Rappahannock Co., VA and SC area as well. From doing more research on this family, I found out that they are descended from an English martyr Dr Rowland Taylor who was burned at that stake in 1555.
      > > Dr Rowland Taylors' grandchildren fled England to the US for fear of further religious persicution.
      > >
      > > I just learned of this today.
      > >
      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rowland_Taylor
      > >
      > > Rick
      > >
      >
      >
      > --
      >
      > Joseph Snurr
      > Cotter, AR.
      >
      > "Age mellows some people; others it makes rotten." - Heard in Arkansas
      >
      > Great-Granddaughter: http://e-pops.org/fam/
      > Angels Encamped About Me, Two http://e-pops.org/aeamt/
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com
      >
      > http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Diane S
      Micki - It is said, but I don t know for sure... that the Taylor s from Caroline, Culpeper, Hanover, etc. counties are descended from that one family, most
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 1, 2009
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        Micki -
        It is said, but I don't know for sure... that the Taylor's from Caroline, Culpeper, Hanover, etc. counties are descended from that one family, most from Col. James Taylor, who, with his two wives, founded a dynasty linked to several presidents... James Madison, Zachary Taylor (thru marriage to Jefferson Davis but there were no children), Gen. George S. Patton, and other outstanding and notable early Americans. Col. James Taylor had only one surviving son with his 1st wife, Frances Walker, James Taylor II, but he had 5 sons, and his son, George had 13 sons and no known daughters with his 1st wife, Rachel Gibson, then 2 more sons with his 2nd wife, Sarah Taliaferro.
        With his 2nd wife, Mary Gregory, Col. James Taylor had only two living sons, but again John had 6 sons, and his sons had more.
        Now if you take the dates for Col. James Taylor b. 12 Feb 1634/34 England, d. 10 Sep 1698 'Mill Hill' Caroline Co., Va., you can only imagine how many sons of sons there have been up to even the Rev. War generation... and then again, the daughters, although not Taylor's (most anyway), had even more descendants.
        Col. James had a 2 yr-old son when he died at age 63.
        Then James had 6 brothers!! I have not even attempted to follow those lines, but hard-to-find Taylor's could be from the brothers... and even then only dates can tell the many named the same (and they all did it) from one another.
        I am grateful that my line ends with Col. James' daughter, Mary b. 29 Jun 1688 d. 10 Jun 1772 m. Captain Henry Pendleton (1683 - 1721).
        Have fun!
        Diane S


        Are all the Taylors the same, I come for Robert William, William Robert, William Robert, and back to Robert William. They had huge families, ten or more, I know what you mean about using the same name over and over and breeding like rabbits! They came from England in the 1800's and landed in Utah and Idaho! Love'd your description of them.

        Micki




        - In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "Diane S" <dsanfilippo303@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Joseph -
        > Thanks... another 'link' to the Black Sheep club! I have so many now I don't know why I bother!
        > Oh, one of the Taylor men who migrated to Virginia, Dr. James Taylor, was the recipient of the first divorce in the Colonies! He had a 'fling' with his house servant while his 'new bride' was treated badly... so she left. Seems to be some kind of pattern in the 17th century men... but this family has been researched so much there are no secrets left, except the names of a few wives! Its said if you connect to a Taylor in Virginia, there is no doubt you are related to the family of John Taylor, original emigrant... father of Col. James Taylor. I have heard it said they bred like rabbits... and named their children all after each other, so keeping up with them is an awesome task. Many are related to this family but just can't find where their 'James, John, Mary, or Sarah' fit in! Its like the largest jigsaw puzzle in the world!
        > I am fortunate, I know where mine fit in... just not the names of the early wives.
        > Well, if he had meant 'strange'... why not say 'strange'... bad choice of words.
        > Anyone researching the Taylor's of Virginia can contact me... and, hopefully, I can help you sort fact from fiction!
        > Diane S
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I too find it interesting and historic, and even of great interest
        > (fascinating) that one would stick to their beliefs to the point of death.
        >
        > I'm wondering if Risk might have meant "funny" as in "peculiar" rather
        > than "funny" as in "humorous"....
        >
        > Interesting how much the way we say things can mean more than what we
        > say.... and eMail hide how we say it.
        >
        > Joseph
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Diane S wrote:
        > > Rick -
        > > I find your choice of words unusual.
        > > I don't really consider it 'funny' to be burned at the stake... I am sure that my 13th great-grandfather suffered before being struck on the head by a kind guard, thus killing him instantly.
        > > I find it 'interesting', and 'historic' since I enjoy learning the history of time and place of my ancestors in order to know them better, but martyrdom is not something most would seek. The Good Reverend Rowland Taylor was a 'hero', and died an honorable death... just not very funny.
        > > Diane S Sanfilippo
        > >
        > > This is terribly funny.
        > >
        > > I am researching for a friend of mine who's grandfather was a Taylor from Limestone, AL. His family comes from the Culpepper Co., Rappahannock Co., VA and SC area as well. From doing more research on this family, I found out that they are descended from an English martyr Dr Rowland Taylor who was burned at that stake in 1555.
        > > Dr Rowland Taylors' grandchildren fled England to the US for fear of further religious persicution.
        > >
        > > I just learned of this today.
        > >
        > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rowland_Taylor
        > >
        > > Rick
        > >
        >
        >
        > --
        >
        > Joseph Snurr
        > Cotter, AR.
        >
        > "Age mellows some people; others it makes rotten." - Heard in Arkansas
        >
        > Great-Granddaughter: http://e-pops.org/fam/
        > Angels Encamped About Me, Two http://e-pops.org/aeamt/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com
        >
        > http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >




        ------------------------------------

        Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com

        http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718


        Yahoo! Groups Links




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • rwe
        Just something real fast.... My Corbin line is related directly to Robert E. Lee s family. He is related to Leticia Corbin who is my 6th gr. grandparents
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 1, 2009
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          Just something real fast....

          My Corbin line is related directly to Robert E. Lee's family. He is related to Leticia Corbin who is my 6th gr. grandparents' daughter.
          I am also related to James Madison somewhere in the mix too.

          Rick
        • Diane S
          Rick - Laetitia Corbin is Gen. Robert E. Lee s 2nd great-grandmother... but neither are related to James Madison... Diane S Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 3:42 PM
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 2, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Rick -
            Laetitia Corbin is Gen. Robert E. Lee's 2nd great-grandmother... but neither are related to James Madison...
            Diane S
            Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 3:42 PM
            Subject: Re: [Genealogy Research Club] Help with my dead end


            Just something real fast....

            My Corbin line is related directly to Robert E. Lee's family. He is related to Leticia Corbin who is my 6th gr. grandparents' daughter.
            I am also related to James Madison somewhere in the mix too.

            Rick



            ------------------------------------

            Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com

            http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718


            Yahoo! Groups Links




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • exmedicrider
            Diane- You are amazing! Such a book of knowledge. Holly
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 2, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Diane-
              You are amazing! Such a book of knowledge.
              Holly


              --- In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "Diane S" <dsanfilippo303@...> wrote:
              >
              > Micki -
              > It is said, but I don't know for sure... that the Taylor's from Caroline, Culpeper, Hanover, etc. counties are descended from that one family, most from Col. James Taylor, who, with his two wives, founded a dynasty linked to several presidents... James Madison, Zachary Taylor (thru marriage to Jefferson Davis but there were no children), Gen. George S. Patton, and other outstanding and notable early Americans. Col. James Taylor had only one surviving son with his 1st wife, Frances Walker, James Taylor II, but he had 5 sons, and his son, George had 13 sons and no known daughters with his 1st wife, Rachel Gibson, then 2 more sons with his 2nd wife, Sarah Taliaferro.
              > With his 2nd wife, Mary Gregory, Col. James Taylor had only two living sons, but again John had 6 sons, and his sons had more.
              > Now if you take the dates for Col. James Taylor b. 12 Feb 1634/34 England, d. 10 Sep 1698 'Mill Hill' Caroline Co., Va., you can only imagine how many sons of sons there have been up to even the Rev. War generation... and then again, the daughters, although not Taylor's (most anyway), had even more descendants.
              > Col. James had a 2 yr-old son when he died at age 63.
              > Then James had 6 brothers!! I have not even attempted to follow those lines, but hard-to-find Taylor's could be from the brothers... and even then only dates can tell the many named the same (and they all did it) from one another.
              > I am grateful that my line ends with Col. James' daughter, Mary b. 29 Jun 1688 d. 10 Jun 1772 m. Captain Henry Pendleton (1683 - 1721).
              > Have fun!
              > Diane S
              >
              >
              > Are all the Taylors the same, I come for Robert William, William Robert, William Robert, and back to Robert William. They had huge families, ten or more, I know what you mean about using the same name over and over and breeding like rabbits! They came from England in the 1800's and landed in Utah and Idaho! Love'd your description of them.
              >
              > Micki
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > - In genealogyresearchclub@yahoogroups.com, "Diane S" <dsanfilippo303@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Joseph -
              > > Thanks... another 'link' to the Black Sheep club! I have so many now I don't know why I bother!
              > > Oh, one of the Taylor men who migrated to Virginia, Dr. James Taylor, was the recipient of the first divorce in the Colonies! He had a 'fling' with his house servant while his 'new bride' was treated badly... so she left. Seems to be some kind of pattern in the 17th century men... but this family has been researched so much there are no secrets left, except the names of a few wives! Its said if you connect to a Taylor in Virginia, there is no doubt you are related to the family of John Taylor, original emigrant... father of Col. James Taylor. I have heard it said they bred like rabbits... and named their children all after each other, so keeping up with them is an awesome task. Many are related to this family but just can't find where their 'James, John, Mary, or Sarah' fit in! Its like the largest jigsaw puzzle in the world!
              > > I am fortunate, I know where mine fit in... just not the names of the early wives.
              > > Well, if he had meant 'strange'... why not say 'strange'... bad choice of words.
              > > Anyone researching the Taylor's of Virginia can contact me... and, hopefully, I can help you sort fact from fiction!
              > > Diane S
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > I too find it interesting and historic, and even of great interest
              > > (fascinating) that one would stick to their beliefs to the point of death.
              > >
              > > I'm wondering if Risk might have meant "funny" as in "peculiar" rather
              > > than "funny" as in "humorous"....
              > >
              > > Interesting how much the way we say things can mean more than what we
              > > say.... and eMail hide how we say it.
              > >
              > > Joseph
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Diane S wrote:
              > > > Rick -
              > > > I find your choice of words unusual.
              > > > I don't really consider it 'funny' to be burned at the stake... I am sure that my 13th great-grandfather suffered before being struck on the head by a kind guard, thus killing him instantly.
              > > > I find it 'interesting', and 'historic' since I enjoy learning the history of time and place of my ancestors in order to know them better, but martyrdom is not something most would seek. The Good Reverend Rowland Taylor was a 'hero', and died an honorable death... just not very funny.
              > > > Diane S Sanfilippo
              > > >
              > > > This is terribly funny.
              > > >
              > > > I am researching for a friend of mine who's grandfather was a Taylor from Limestone, AL. His family comes from the Culpepper Co., Rappahannock Co., VA and SC area as well. From doing more research on this family, I found out that they are descended from an English martyr Dr Rowland Taylor who was burned at that stake in 1555.
              > > > Dr Rowland Taylors' grandchildren fled England to the US for fear of further religious persicution.
              > > >
              > > > I just learned of this today.
              > > >
              > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rowland_Taylor
              > > >
              > > > Rick
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --
              > >
              > > Joseph Snurr
              > > Cotter, AR.
              > >
              > > "Age mellows some people; others it makes rotten." - Heard in Arkansas
              > >
              > > Great-Granddaughter: http://e-pops.org/fam/
              > > Angels Encamped About Me, Two http://e-pops.org/aeamt/
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------
              > >
              > > Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com
              > >
              > > http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Searching for your ancestry? You'll find great help at Ancestry.Com
              >
              > http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=5647408&siteid=18621718
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
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