Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [genchatfriends] Introducing Myself

Expand Messages
  • annystokes
    Hi, Kay Wish there would ve been a Giffen in that bunch of surnames : ) My maternal grandmother was a Giffen -- I have a good amount of information on the
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 30, 2008
      Hi, Kay

      Wish there would've been a Giffen in that bunch of surnames : ) My maternal grandmother was a Giffen -- I have a good amount of information on the ones here in the States and can get them back to Glasgow area, but then nothing.

      There's a cheese a Giffen ancestor developed in Ireland which is now selling again in Scotland. I've wanted someone to taste it and let me know how it is. Unfortunately, it doesn't ship overseas as yet. It is called Dunlop Ayrshire Cheddar Cheese. There is a lot of history behind this cheese made from the milk of Ayrshire cows. If you happen to taste it, let me know how it is : )

      Anny

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Kay Gordon
      To: genealogychatfriends@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 6:27 AM
      Subject: [genchatfriends] Introducing Myself


      Hi,

      My name is Kay and I live in Scotland.

      I've been researching my family for about 3 years and have managed to
      find abt 3,000 people so far. My focus at the moment is my maternal
      grandparents and their ancestors. I have only just recently made a
      crack in that brickwall - still have some things to check out and
      hopefully someone on here will be able to help me finish smashing it down.

      The surnames that are my focus at the moment are Carter and Page
      located in Cambridgeshire/Huntingdonshire, England abt 1850ish-1890ish.

      Other surnames I'm researching are: Gordon, Low, Middleton, Mollison,
      Taylor, Anderson, Kerr, Lamb, Edwards, McDonald/MacDonald,
      Tweedale/Tweeddale/Tweddle, Bruce, Adie, Truelove/Trulove,
      Fairweather, Carnegie and some others in Scotland and elsewhere, but
      mainly in Angus, Scotland.

      I started off with the intention of researching my family tree for the
      sake of my daughter so that when she turned around and asked "where do
      I come from?" I could show her. Done great with my family, but not
      even started my ex-partner's family yet. Maybe with time and help
      I'll be in a position to start on that side of her ancestry.

      I'm also looking forward to gettng to knwo all of you and hopefully
      help some of you with your ancestors.

      Hugs and good wishes

      Kay Gordon
      Scotland





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kay
      April, I know the feeling well enough. What info do you have? Maybe I can tie it in to mine someplace. I have Kerr info as far back as 1780 in Scotland. If
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 1, 2008
        April,

        I know the feeling well enough. What info do you have? Maybe I can tie it in to mine someplace. I have Kerr info as far back as 1780 in Scotland. If you want I can send you the info off list.

        Kay Gordon


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kay
        Hi Anny, I ll certainly look out for your family s cheese. My 8 yr old daughter and I love cheese, so will definitely give it a try if we see it. As for the
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 1, 2008
          Hi Anny,

          I'll certainly look out for your family's cheese. My 8 yr old daughter and I love cheese, so will definitely give it a try if we see it.

          As for the Giffen name, I have seen it someplace on a tree that I was sent information from. I'll have a look and see if I can find it again. If I do, I'll pass it along.

          Regards & best wishes

          Kay Gordon


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • annystokes
          Kay-- How cool -- I d love to know about the cheese. It was considered so unique when it was first introduced in Scotland that the Dunlop woman was almost
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 1, 2008
            Kay--

            How cool -- I'd love to know about the cheese. It was considered so unique when it was first introduced in Scotland that the Dunlop woman was almost considered a witch. There is a memorial to her along with a cheese press which is dated after her death. I'll look again for the story ...

            Here it is (though wikipedia isn't the best resource ...) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunlop_cheese (lots of cool pictures on the site).

            My other family names over there are Dromgoole. I think the Dromgoole's, along with some of the Giffens, went to Ireland during the persecution of the Covenanters. A lot of the Giffen's were from an area just southwest of Glasgow. There was the Giffen Castle there. The retaining wall is still there (from which I have 2 small stones which I cherish). The Giffen Manor House is now the Giffen Castle Apartment for tourist rental (there are pictures on the website):

            http://www.unique-cottages.co.uk/cottages/south/ayrshire/the_giffen_castle_apartment?view=printfriendly
            The Giffen Castle Apartment is superbly situated on the top floor of a small baronial castle tucked away at the end of half a mile of private drive and amongst mature woodland. Set in the rolling hills of North Ayrshire in the South West of Scotland, its delightful grounds feature rhododendrons, monkey puzzle trees and Scots pine. Only 30 minutes from Prestwick and Glasgow International Airports, the Giffen Castle Apartment is an ideal base for keen golfers (the championship courses of Troon and Turnberry can be reached within the hour). For those interested in Scottish heritage and literature, it stands right on the edge of Burns country. It also affords a tranquil haven from which to explore the cultural and shopping attractions of Glasgow (40minutes), Edinburgh (90 minutes) and central and south west Scotland in general. There is also the option of leaving the car at Dalry (4m), from where there is a regular train service to Glasgow (journey time only 20 minutes)...


            My maternal grandfather is an Anderson of the Scottish Anderson's though we don't have his direct line back over the Atlantic yet. As you see, I'm pretty well filled with some good Scottish blood : )

            My father's side came from the Yarbrough's which I think originated in the Lincolnshire area of England. His mother was a "Henry". I haven't been able to learn much at all about the Henry's. I haven't been able to trace them before they settled in East Texas - just a generation before my grandmother was born.

            It's fun to find out some of these things!

            Anny

            Part of the Dunlop Cheese story:

            Barbara Gilmour or Barbra Gilmor in the spelling of her time, was a woman whose wits had been sharpened by her exile as a presbyterian in Ireland around 1660, during Scotland's troubles between the Restoration of Charles II and the dirk & drublie dayis after the revolution.[2] In Ireland she is thought to have learned the art of making whole milk cheese. She may have been in the Bantry Bay area, County Cork, where James Hamilton was based. James was a strong presbyterian adherent and son of Hans Hamilton the first Protestant minister of Dunlop Kirk, later becoming Baron Hamilton, Viscount Clandeboye.[3]

            It is not known precisely where she came from, however 'Gilmore' or 'Gilmour' is a common local name, with for example a family of that name living in the 'Lands of Chapeltoun' at around the start of the 18th-century.[4]


            Eventually, according to the Rev. Brisbane[5] writing in 1793, after the Revolution of 1688, she returned to Dunlop, in what is now East Ayrshire, bringing the recipe for the cheese with her. Paterson states that she was from the wife of John Dunlop, the farmer of Overhill Farm, now known as 'The Hill'. Introducing a new style of cheese was not straightforward and "Knowing" that cheese could not be made from whole milk, some of the locals came close to accusing her of witchcraft which could have resulted in her being burned to death at the Cross of Irvine.
            Another source states that she was a pious young woman - a devout Covenanter; and, hearing of the martyrdom of Margaret Wilson (Scottish martyr) on Wigtown Sands, and being determined not to renounce the Covenant, she fled, like many others, from her home in Ayrshire to Ireland, and found employment in the county Down, where she acquired a knowledge of the Irish process of cheese making. The persecution of females having abated after the horrible event of Wigtown Sands, Miss Gilmour returned to her home in Dunlop, and became a farmer's wife.[6]

            Some others accused her of copying their recipes and indeed a farmer, Mr W. Aiton of Strathaven, pointed out that practical cheese makers were already aware of the benefit of adding cream to cheese before Barbara's time, and in his opinion Dunlop cheese was so named from a trader who took these cheeses from the parish up to Glasgow; others have cast doubt on the Irish origin of the 'recipe' without disputing Barbara Gilmour's introduction of Dunlop cheese.[7]


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Kay
            To: genealogychatfriends@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 4:27 PM
            Subject: Re: [genchatfriends] Introducing Myself




            Hi Anny,

            I'll certainly look out for your family's cheese. My 8 yr old daughter and I love cheese, so will definitely give it a try if we see it.

            As for the Giffen name, I have seen it someplace on a tree that I was sent information from. I'll have a look and see if I can find it again. If I do, I'll pass it along.

            Regards & best wishes

            Kay Gordon

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • April_Anastasia
            Kay, That would be great!  Thanks.  _;D   ~april     I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once! ... From: Kay
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 2, 2008
              Kay,
              That would be great!  Thanks.  _;D
               
              ~april
               
               
              "I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once!"



              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Kay <gnlgymd@...>
              To: genealogychatfriends@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, July 1, 2008 2:46:08 PM
              Subject: Re: [genchatfriends] Introducing Myself


              April,

              I know the feeling well enough. What info do you have? Maybe I can tie it in to mine someplace. I have Kerr info as far back as 1780 in Scotland. If you want I can send you the info off list.

              Kay Gordon

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.