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New Possible HIV Treatment!

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  • R. Mitchell Deighan
    hey guys, hope this isnĀ¹t considered off topic... it was extremely exciting to just hear about this possibly monumental medical breakthrough!!: Mitch (ps:
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 14, 2004
      New Possible HIV Treatment! hey guys, hope this isn’t considered off topic...
      it was extremely exciting to just hear about this possibly monumental medical breakthrough!!:
      Mitch
      (ps: last night, I heard this reported on our local FOX affiliate, WTXF-TV29, here in Philly)

      Discovery 'Can Destroy HIV' Researchers Claim
      by The Associated Press
      Posted: December 13, 2004 2:02 pm ET

      (Piscataway, New Jersey) Researchers at Rutgers University say they
      have developed a trio of drugs they believe can destroy HIV, the
      virus that causes AIDS.

      The drugs, called DAPYs, mimic the virus by changing shape, which
      enables them to interfere with the way HIV attacks the immune system.

      Tests conducted in conjunction with Johnson and Johnson have shown
      the drug to be easily absorbed with minimal side effects. It also can
      be taken in one pill, in contrast to the drug cocktails currently
      taken by many AIDS patients.

      "This could be it," Stephen Smith, the head of the department of
      infectious diseases at Saint Michael's Medical Center in Newark, told
      The Sunday Star-Ledger of Newark. "We're all looking for the next
      class of drugs."

      A research team led by Rutgers chemist Eddy Arnold pre-published
      details of the most promising of the three drugs, known as R278474,
      last month in the electronic edition of the Journal of Medicinal
      Chemistry. Full details will be published in the journal in early
      2005.

      Arnold, 47, has worked at dismantling the AIDS virus over the last 20
      years. He uses X-ray crystallography, a technique to determine the
      structure of molecules, the smallest particles that can retain all
      the characteristics of an element or compound.

      The research has targeted reverse transcriptase, a submiscroscopic
      protein composed of two coiled chains of amino acids. It is
      considered HIV's key protein.

      "Reverse transcriptase is very important in the biology of AIDS,"
      Smith said. "If you can really inhibit reverse transcriptase, you can
      stop AIDS."

      The optimism about R278474 stems from its potential to interfere with
      an enzyme that the virus needs to copy and insert itself into a human
      cell.

      "We're onto something very, very special," Arnold told the newspaper.

      Arnold established his lab at Rutgers' Center for Advanced
      Biotechnology and Medicine in 1987. His current 30-member research
      team is partnered with Johnson and Johnson subsidiaries Janssen
      Pharmaceutica and Tibotec-Virco NV.

      An important advancement in Arnold's research came in 1990 when
      Belgian scientist Paul Janssen was added to the collaboration.
      Janssen, considered a drug pioneer, published a paper that year that
      described a new drug that blocked reverse transcriptase but caused
      resistant strains of the virus to pop up too quickly.

      Janssen sought out Arnold, who used crystallography to detail the
      structure of RT. Their work ultimately led to the RT inhibitors.

      Two earlier relatives of R278474, called TMC-120 and TMC-125, have
      showed promise in clinical trials. Johnson and Johnson officials told
      the newspaper that the two drugs are of major interest to them, but
      did not discuss R278474.

      "We may eventually win the war against HIV/AIDS. That would be an
      extremely rewarding and satisfying outcome," Arnold said. "But even
      to have contributed to helping the health and well-being of the many
      people infected with HIV will be very satisfying if that were to
      happen."

      ©Associated Press 2004
      ------------------------------------------------------------------
      ------------------------------------------------------------------
    • yank_canuck
      ... COOL!!! No more toxic cocktails? I wish I knew more abpout the so-called zappers - they are said to be good. http://www.zapperplans.com/plans.html
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 19, 2004
        --- In gaykingdom@yahoogroups.com, "R. Mitchell Deighan"
        <mitch.deighan@v...> wrote:
        > hey guys, hope this isn1t considered off topic...
        > it was extremely exciting to just hear about this possibly monumental
        > medical breakthrough!!:
        > Mitch
        > (ps: last night, I heard this reported on our local FOX affiliate,
        > WTXF-TV29, here in Philly)
        >
        > Discovery 'Can Destroy HIV' Researchers Claim
        > by The Associated Press
        > Posted: December 13, 2004 2:02 pm ET
        >
        > (Piscataway, New Jersey) Researchers at Rutgers University say they
        > have developed a trio of drugs they believe can destroy HIV, the
        > virus that causes AIDS.
        >
        > The drugs, called DAPYs, mimic the virus by changing shape, which
        > enables them to interfere with the way HIV attacks the immune system.
        >
        > Tests conducted in conjunction with Johnson and Johnson have shown
        > the drug to be easily absorbed with minimal side effects. It also can
        > be taken in one pill, in contrast to the drug cocktails currently
        > taken by many AIDS patients.
        >
        > "This could be it," Stephen Smith, the head of the department of
        > infectious diseases at Saint Michael's Medical Center in Newark, told
        > The Sunday Star-Ledger of Newark. "We're all looking for the next
        > class of drugs."
        >
        > A research team led by Rutgers chemist Eddy Arnold pre-published
        > details of the most promising of the three drugs, known as R278474,
        > last month in the electronic edition of the Journal of Medicinal
        > Chemistry. Full details will be published in the journal in early
        > 2005.
        >
        > Arnold, 47, has worked at dismantling the AIDS virus over the last 20
        > years. He uses X-ray crystallography, a technique to determine the
        > structure of molecules, the smallest particles that can retain all
        > the characteristics of an element or compound.
        >
        > The research has targeted reverse transcriptase, a submiscroscopic
        > protein composed of two coiled chains of amino acids. It is
        > considered HIV's key protein.
        >
        > "Reverse transcriptase is very important in the biology of AIDS,"
        > Smith said. "If you can really inhibit reverse transcriptase, you can
        > stop AIDS."
        >
        > The optimism about R278474 stems from its potential to interfere with
        > an enzyme that the virus needs to copy and insert itself into a human
        > cell.
        >
        > "We're onto something very, very special," Arnold told the newspaper.
        >
        > Arnold established his lab at Rutgers' Center for Advanced
        > Biotechnology and Medicine in 1987. His current 30-member research
        > team is partnered with Johnson and Johnson subsidiaries Janssen
        > Pharmaceutica and Tibotec-Virco NV.
        >
        > An important advancement in Arnold's research came in 1990 when
        > Belgian scientist Paul Janssen was added to the collaboration.
        > Janssen, considered a drug pioneer, published a paper that year that
        > described a new drug that blocked reverse transcriptase but caused
        > resistant strains of the virus to pop up too quickly.
        >
        > Janssen sought out Arnold, who used crystallography to detail the
        > structure of RT. Their work ultimately led to the RT inhibitors.
        >
        > Two earlier relatives of R278474, called TMC-120 and TMC-125, have
        > showed promise in clinical trials. Johnson and Johnson officials told
        > the newspaper that the two drugs are of major interest to them, but
        > did not discuss R278474.
        >
        > "We may eventually win the war against HIV/AIDS. That would be an
        > extremely rewarding and satisfying outcome," Arnold said. "But even
        > to have contributed to helping the health and well-being of the many
        > people infected with HIV will be very satisfying if that were to
        > happen."
        >
        > Ā©Associated Press 2004

        COOL!!! No more toxic cocktails?
        I wish I knew more abpout the so-called "zappers" - they are said to be good.
        http://www.zapperplans.com/plans.html
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