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[gwmg] - Re: Need Some Help

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  • ten_jinn
    Chris, Very good points and I agree. All I was saying is two things: 1. If there is a reaction (which there should be), I feel that it should be an appropriate
    Message 1 of 31 , Jun 1, 2009
      Chris,

      Very good points and I agree.

      All I was saying is two things:

      1. If there is a reaction (which there should be), I feel that it should be an appropriate one and one that makes sense and is consistent with the campaign.
      2. The GM needs to be careful about how the reaction is perceived by the players. It's about having fun and I don't think anyone would think it's fun if the GM is perceived as "vindictive."

      Rereading my post, I'm not sure if I expressed myself clearly enough.

      Again, good discussion!

      Ten_Jinn


      --- In gammaworld@yahoogroups.com, Christopher Hinderliter <hinderli1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Honestly, guys, the need for finess was lost when the players detonated a nuke in a town full of living people. It doesn't matter that it is not real, the act of nuking an entire community is not the sort of thing that should be able to happen without repercussions - even in a game. 
      >  
      > Imagine what would  happen in a James Bond (r), Master Spy (tm), or d20 Modern(r) campaign if the PCs nuked a town... do you not think that the PCs would be disavowed, branded as rogue agents and terrorists, before being hounded to the ends of the earth by the powers that be? Of course they would, and there is plenty of interesting options for roleplaying if you like that kind of thing.  
      >  
      > Rather than worrying about being considered petty or vindictive because he had his "master plan"... what was the word... "spoiled" by the players, I commend the GM on trying to figure out an innovative way to continue the campaign after the PCs essentially ended it.
      >  
      > And I do mean end it. After all, a campaign is about running a series of adventures within a setting filled with a variety of political factions, tribes, city-states, cryptic alliances, etc. Each interacting in political balancing act, in order to maintain some sense of normalcy within the region. With the wanton destruction of a major faction, like an iron society stronghold, there will be a huge power vacuum that is going to destabilize the entire region, effectively causing the GM to have to alter the entire campaign setting; because everything has changed.
      >  
      > Don't believe me? Think of 9-11. Everything changed.
      >  
      > Now, how does this relate to the fun involved in roleplaying?
      > By creating opportunities.
      >  
      > In the case in question, our GM took this event in stride and asked for assistance in coming up with some reasonable ideas with handling a campaign-shattering event. Again he is to be commended for this. Remember, the whole purpose of playing an RPG is to respond to the unpredictableness of the players in a manner that is fun to everyone in question; after all, playing rpgs are supposed to be social events. This is why the MA and GW rules were originally set out as an adjustable framework to meet the gaming needs of all of the players (GM included). (***Thanks be to Jim Ward***)
      >  
      > So why all of this worrying?
      >  
      > The players don't need to be warned that there will be consequences to nuking a town. They don't live in a vacuum, heck the whole game is about consequences... with a little randomization thrown in for general effect. Indeed, when you think of it, all games (including tic-tac-toe) are really about having fun dealing with the consequences of your actions.
      >  
      > So, what is an appropriate reaction?
      >  
      > There is a lot of things which could be done, based on the campaign as a whole. Here are a half-dozen possibilities, off the top of my head.
      >  
      > 1) The PCs could be hounded by a band of Radioactivists trying to declare them as saints for sanctifying the region by bringing the glory of the divine Ay-tom to it; Radioactivist which wish to bring them to live at the shrine they have built them on ground zero....
      >  
      > 2) The Restorationists could have set up a hit squad to capture them (dead or partially alive) in order to question their brains regarding scientific details about the construction, use, and after-effects of dealing with an "actual nuke", completely oblivious to the horror which it caused.
      >  
      > 3) The Healers could brand them as untouchables, forever barring them from getting aid from any with whom they associate - this sort of sanction could have interesting long term effects in a campaign which the GM could expoit in the sake of cool roleplaying opportunities.
      >  
      > 4) The KoGP, though pleased at the overall death count, might be horrified at the creation of an entire dead zone capable of destroying the human genome, and likely to attract the attention of those crazed radioactivist cults. As a result, they might refuse to harbor or aid the PCs, shunning them whenever they attempt to pass through KoGP territory and refusing to allow them to stay in towns under their influence ("For they bear a stench of mutants that cannot be washed from their skins, and bring risk to the human populace by attracting the interest of iron society agents in an unnatural manner.")
      >  
      > 5) Seeker death squads whose cause is just... Need I say more?
      >  
      > 6) Following the blast, several small tribes were displaced as their normal prey fled the region; additionally, due to the ensuing radioactive destruction, changes in weather patterns, a pattern of chaos and destruction followed as newly mutated, carnivorous, monstrous animals stagger out of the blast zone looking to feed, plants adapt to the radiation in strange new ways (giant fungus horrors, etc), and electronics are disrupted. In response, a large band of entropists get all excited and sends a highly armed force into the region as an occupying force, seeking to take advantage of the new, potential opportunities for fulfilling their objectives as a CA.
      >  
      > The list could go on, but I only promissed six ideas. As for me, thought, I really like the idea of "Rise of the Death Machine" and the potential roleplaying opportunities that could occur in the wake of its overt path of destruction, and the manner in which the characters should choose to react to their impending contact.
      >  
      > Regards,
      > Chris 
    • ten_jinn
      Chris, Very good points and I agree. All I was saying is two things: 1. If there is a reaction (which there should be), I feel that it should be an appropriate
      Message 31 of 31 , Jun 1, 2009
        Chris,

        Very good points and I agree.

        All I was saying is two things:

        1. If there is a reaction (which there should be), I feel that it should be an appropriate one and one that makes sense and is consistent with the campaign.
        2. The GM needs to be careful about how the reaction is perceived by the players. It's about having fun and I don't think anyone would think it's fun if the GM is perceived as "vindictive."

        Rereading my post, I'm not sure if I expressed myself clearly enough.

        Again, good discussion!

        Ten_Jinn


        --- In gammaworld@yahoogroups.com, Christopher Hinderliter <hinderli1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Honestly, guys, the need for finess was lost when the players detonated a nuke in a town full of living people. It doesn't matter that it is not real, the act of nuking an entire community is not the sort of thing that should be able to happen without repercussions - even in a game. 
        >  
        > Imagine what would  happen in a James Bond (r), Master Spy (tm), or d20 Modern(r) campaign if the PCs nuked a town... do you not think that the PCs would be disavowed, branded as rogue agents and terrorists, before being hounded to the ends of the earth by the powers that be? Of course they would, and there is plenty of interesting options for roleplaying if you like that kind of thing.  
        >  
        > Rather than worrying about being considered petty or vindictive because he had his "master plan"... what was the word... "spoiled" by the players, I commend the GM on trying to figure out an innovative way to continue the campaign after the PCs essentially ended it.
        >  
        > And I do mean end it. After all, a campaign is about running a series of adventures within a setting filled with a variety of political factions, tribes, city-states, cryptic alliances, etc. Each interacting in political balancing act, in order to maintain some sense of normalcy within the region. With the wanton destruction of a major faction, like an iron society stronghold, there will be a huge power vacuum that is going to destabilize the entire region, effectively causing the GM to have to alter the entire campaign setting; because everything has changed.
        >  
        > Don't believe me? Think of 9-11. Everything changed.
        >  
        > Now, how does this relate to the fun involved in roleplaying?
        > By creating opportunities.
        >  
        > In the case in question, our GM took this event in stride and asked for assistance in coming up with some reasonable ideas with handling a campaign-shattering event. Again he is to be commended for this. Remember, the whole purpose of playing an RPG is to respond to the unpredictableness of the players in a manner that is fun to everyone in question; after all, playing rpgs are supposed to be social events. This is why the MA and GW rules were originally set out as an adjustable framework to meet the gaming needs of all of the players (GM included). (***Thanks be to Jim Ward***)
        >  
        > So why all of this worrying?
        >  
        > The players don't need to be warned that there will be consequences to nuking a town. They don't live in a vacuum, heck the whole game is about consequences... with a little randomization thrown in for general effect. Indeed, when you think of it, all games (including tic-tac-toe) are really about having fun dealing with the consequences of your actions.
        >  
        > So, what is an appropriate reaction?
        >  
        > There is a lot of things which could be done, based on the campaign as a whole. Here are a half-dozen possibilities, off the top of my head.
        >  
        > 1) The PCs could be hounded by a band of Radioactivists trying to declare them as saints for sanctifying the region by bringing the glory of the divine Ay-tom to it; Radioactivist which wish to bring them to live at the shrine they have built them on ground zero....
        >  
        > 2) The Restorationists could have set up a hit squad to capture them (dead or partially alive) in order to question their brains regarding scientific details about the construction, use, and after-effects of dealing with an "actual nuke", completely oblivious to the horror which it caused.
        >  
        > 3) The Healers could brand them as untouchables, forever barring them from getting aid from any with whom they associate - this sort of sanction could have interesting long term effects in a campaign which the GM could expoit in the sake of cool roleplaying opportunities.
        >  
        > 4) The KoGP, though pleased at the overall death count, might be horrified at the creation of an entire dead zone capable of destroying the human genome, and likely to attract the attention of those crazed radioactivist cults. As a result, they might refuse to harbor or aid the PCs, shunning them whenever they attempt to pass through KoGP territory and refusing to allow them to stay in towns under their influence ("For they bear a stench of mutants that cannot be washed from their skins, and bring risk to the human populace by attracting the interest of iron society agents in an unnatural manner.")
        >  
        > 5) Seeker death squads whose cause is just... Need I say more?
        >  
        > 6) Following the blast, several small tribes were displaced as their normal prey fled the region; additionally, due to the ensuing radioactive destruction, changes in weather patterns, a pattern of chaos and destruction followed as newly mutated, carnivorous, monstrous animals stagger out of the blast zone looking to feed, plants adapt to the radiation in strange new ways (giant fungus horrors, etc), and electronics are disrupted. In response, a large band of entropists get all excited and sends a highly armed force into the region as an occupying force, seeking to take advantage of the new, potential opportunities for fulfilling their objectives as a CA.
        >  
        > The list could go on, but I only promissed six ideas. As for me, thought, I really like the idea of "Rise of the Death Machine" and the potential roleplaying opportunities that could occur in the wake of its overt path of destruction, and the manner in which the characters should choose to react to their impending contact.
        >  
        > Regards,
        > Chris 
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