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Re: [gwmg] - hey all, few GW 4th ed questions

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  • Aragaith
    ok but there has to be someone here who has done gamma knights at some point, i d like to find out what they did for damaging the armor rules.
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 1 9:39 AM
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      ok but there has to be someone here who has done gamma knights at some point, i'd like to find out what they did for damaging the armor rules.

      On 8/30/06, Soylent Green <gsoylent@...> wrote:

      iI'm pretty sure neither Overlord of Bonparr or Home before the Sky Falls
      contain rules for power armor. The whole slotting thing was contained
      exclusively in the Gamma Knights boxed set. If you think there are holes in
      the rules you are probably right. I'm afraid that is just the way
      roleplaying were written back then.

      Not to say that editing and play testing of rpgs has improved that much.

      >From: "aragaith" < Aragaith@...>
      >Reply-To: gammaworld@yahoogroups.com
      >To: gammaworld@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [gwmg] - hey all, few GW 4th ed questions
      >Date: Wed, 30 Aug 2006 06:38:45 -0000


      >
      >hello, just found this group, was wondering if i could get some help
      >trying to locate some rules that seem to be missing.
      >
      >Gamma knights, the powered armor rules for use in the main gamma world
      >stuff, theres alot of stuff in the descriptiosn about systems beign
      >damaged but there doens't seem to be any rules on how to damage the
      >systems. no translation of slots to hit points ot anything...
      >
      >my GM and i have been trying to figure out systems but they start to
      >get over complicated, we have most of the books, missing "the overlord
      >of bonparr" and "home before the sky falls". i'm thinking there might
      >be these rules in "home ebfore the sky falls"
      >
      >anyone know? or has anyone devised some rules that work well?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


    • aragaith
      ... some ... rules. ... and i mean for using the powered armor in gamma world rules, not the gamma knights mini game.
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 1 9:44 AM
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        --- In gammaworld@yahoogroups.com, Aragaith <Aragaith@...> wrote:
        >
        > ok but there has to be someone here who has done gamma knights at
        some
        > point, i'd like to find out what they did for damaging the armor
        rules.
        >


        and i mean for using the powered armor in gamma world rules, not the
        gamma knights mini game.
      • Reginald Blue
        Perhaps this would be of some use: http://www.identicalsoftware.com/rpg/gw/secrets.pdf Look at the Robotic Critical Hit system on page 27 and see if you might
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 5 11:46 AM
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          Perhaps this would be of some use:

          http://www.identicalsoftware.com/rpg/gw/secrets.pdf

          Look at the Robotic Critical Hit system on page 27 and see if you
          might be able to adapt it to the armor rules?

          On 9/1/06, Aragaith <Aragaith@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > ok but there has to be someone here who has done gamma knights at some point, i'd like to find out what they did for damaging the armor rules.
          >
          >
          >
        • Soylent Green
          Say one wanted to run a Thundaar inspired GW min-campaign. Not as a spoof or as a nostalgia trip (much), but just taking the same simple premise in which the
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 5 3:47 PM
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            Say one wanted to run a Thundaar inspired GW min-campaign. Not as a spoof or
            as a nostalgia trip (much), but just taking the same simple premise in which
            the party are post-apocalyptic super-heroes who protect innocent villagers
            from natural hazards and super-criminal mutants (the "Wizards" in Thundaar).

            On the face of it GW rules are perfectly suited for this (though you might
            want to tweak it so that ordinary villagers do not have many hitpoints are
            useful mutations).

            The trouble I have visualising it is with the plot structure. There are
            things that you can get away with in a cartoon. And in most Thundaar
            adventures really just happen by accident. Thundaar just happens to be
            passing through when the Wizard attacks the village or some threat emerges,
            they save day and hit the road once again. All in all I don't think my
            players would go for a campaign in which all the adventures occur by
            accident ( it's also never quite explained why Thundaar and co are always
            travelling).

            So I guess what I am looking for is some sort of plot device that can serve
            on an ongoing basis to alert the party as to where trouble is brewing. Some
            possibilities may include:

            1. Premunitions: someone in the party get premunitions of where trouble the
            next crisis is going to strike. Given that the premunitions are for future
            events, the party have the opportunity to get to the right place just in
            time.

            2. Technology: The party have access to some super-technology (computer and
            satellites links) that allow them to monitor events on the continent
            (world?) and possibly some sort of flying machine to get there.

            3. The various villages have a way to contact the heroes and ask for help
            (long-range telepaths? beacon towers? Radio? ).

            4. The party has some sort of informant among the Wizards.

            5. The party have in their possesion some sort of secret "list of Wizards by
            territory" document and are sort of knocking them out one by one.

            Thoughts?

            James B
          • Ralph Glatt
            Well, as I had always seen on the show, the Wizards made no effort to conceal their plans of conquest. I just figured that naturally word would get out that
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 5 4:36 PM
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              Well, as I had always seen on the show, the Wizards made no effort to conceal their plans of conquest. I just figured that naturally word would get out that so-and-so was opressing people in this section here, and Thundaar, having known what it's like to be in thrall to a Wizard, would hear about it and go there to put a stop to it. Bad news travels fast, even without the help of technology.
               
               
               
              Ralph

              Soylent Green <gsoylent@...> wrote:
              Say one wanted to run a Thundaar inspired GW min-campaign. Not as a spoof or
              as a nostalgia trip (much), but just taking the same simple premise in which
              the party are post-apocalyptic super-heroes who protect innocent villagers
              from natural hazards and super-criminal mutants (the "Wizards" in Thundaar).

              On the face of it GW rules are perfectly suited for this (though you might
              want to tweak it so that ordinary villagers do not have many hitpoints are
              useful mutations).

              The trouble I have visualising it is with the plot structure. There are
              things that you can get away with in a cartoon. And in most Thundaar
              adventures really just happen by accident. Thundaar just happens to be
              passing through when the Wizard attacks the village or some threat emerges,
              they save day and hit the road once again. All in all I don't think my
              players would go for a campaign in which all the adventures occur by
              accident ( it's also never quite explained why Thundaar and co are always
              travelling).

              So I guess what I am looking for is some sort of plot device that can serve
              on an ongoing basis to alert the party as to where trouble is brewing. Some
              possibilities may include:

              1. Premunitions: someone in the party get premunitions of where trouble the
              next crisis is going to strike. Given that the premunitions are for future
              events, the party have the opportunity to get to the right place just in
              time.

              2. Technology: The party have access to some super-technology (computer and
              satellites links) that allow them to monitor events on the continent
              (world?) and possibly some sort of flying machine to get there.

              3. The various villages have a way to contact the heroes and ask for help
              (long-range telepaths? beacon towers? Radio? ).

              4. The party has some sort of informant among the Wizards.

              5. The party have in their possesion some sort of secret "list of Wizards by
              territory" document and are sort of knocking them out one by one.

              Thoughts?

              James B



              Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2ยข/min or less.

            • Dan InklebargerII
              The point behind Thundarr was that he had escaped Aeriel s evil Father Wizard (Wizards are bad - Sorcerers are good) taking the Sun sword in the process. He
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 5 7:16 PM
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                The point behind Thundarr was that he had escaped
                Aeriel's evil Father Wizard (Wizards are bad -
                Sorcerers are good) taking the Sun sword in the
                process. He then set out to take down the 7 Citadels
                that were ran by the Wizards.
                Thundarr's people, the Barbarians, are a strong
                independant race that dwells in the Central plain
                region. Thundarr goes after the Wizards, because they
                - like all evil conquerers - are enslaving the people
                of "new" earth, and gathering the tech of the Ancients
                in order to build their own twisted Wizard
                societies(I'm assuming their societies would be
                twisted - I mean look at Gemini - Now there's a guy
                who could use some decaf.). . . Moks are from Virginia
                by the way - just thought I would throw that in.
                You can run a gajillion(That's alot) of adventures
                off of this premise alone - I know I did. I used D&D
                3.5 to get all of my nifty spell abilities(Light
                Bridge), and I grabbed Future Tech, Weapons Locker,
                D20 Apocalypse and all the episodes of Thudarr - which
                you can find on Ebay pretty cheap(This will fill you
                in on all the cool races that live in Thundarr's world
                - Not to mention it gives a good - if not somewhat
                crazy look at all of the Wizards he encounters)not to
                mention the nostalgia . . sigh.
                It was almost like running old D&D - exploring the
                realm of the ancients Under the Broken Moon(BTW Google
                "Under the Broken Moon" - Someone made their own game
                for Thundarr - I didn't like the simplicity of the
                rules, But he had scads of awesome info!!!
                I hope all this rambling was a little helpful - Good
                Luck with it - and remember, it just a mix of Conan
                and Star Wars.
                Dan

                Aerial: "Whatever it is, it wasn't created on this
                Earth"
                Thundarr: "But it may meet it end here, To
                Battle!!!!!!!!!"
                Stalker From the Stars



                --- Soylent Green <gsoylent@...> wrote:

                > Say one wanted to run a Thundaar inspired GW
                > min-campaign. Not as a spoof or
                > as a nostalgia trip (much), but just taking the same
                > simple premise in which
                > the party are post-apocalyptic super-heroes who
                > protect innocent villagers
                > from natural hazards and super-criminal mutants (the
                > "Wizards" in Thundaar).
                >
                > On the face of it GW rules are perfectly suited for
                > this (though you might
                > want to tweak it so that ordinary villagers do not
                > have many hitpoints are
                > useful mutations).
                >
                > The trouble I have visualising it is with the plot
                > structure. There are
                > things that you can get away with in a cartoon. And
                > in most Thundaar
                > adventures really just happen by accident. Thundaar
                > just happens to be
                > passing through when the Wizard attacks the village
                > or some threat emerges,
                > they save day and hit the road once again. All in
                > all I don't think my
                > players would go for a campaign in which all the
                > adventures occur by
                > accident ( it's also never quite explained why
                > Thundaar and co are always
                > travelling).
                >
                > So I guess what I am looking for is some sort of
                > plot device that can serve
                > on an ongoing basis to alert the party as to where
                > trouble is brewing. Some
                > possibilities may include:
                >
                > 1. Premunitions: someone in the party get
                > premunitions of where trouble the
                > next crisis is going to strike. Given that the
                > premunitions are for future
                > events, the party have the opportunity to get to the
                > right place just in
                > time.
                >
                > 2. Technology: The party have access to some
                > super-technology (computer and
                > satellites links) that allow them to monitor events
                > on the continent
                > (world?) and possibly some sort of flying machine to
                > get there.
                >
                > 3. The various villages have a way to contact the
                > heroes and ask for help
                > (long-range telepaths? beacon towers? Radio? ).
                >
                > 4. The party has some sort of informant among the
                > Wizards.
                >
                > 5. The party have in their possesion some sort of
                > secret "list of Wizards by
                > territory" document and are sort of knocking them
                > out one by one.
                >
                > Thoughts?
                >
                > James B
                >
                >
                >


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              • Reginald Blue
                ... ... One of the things that the Champions rules suggested was that you could run a game in two modes... serial or episodic. I would argue that
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 8 4:43 PM
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                  On 9/5/06, Soylent Green <gsoylent@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Say one wanted to run a Thundaar inspired GW min-campaign.

                  <snip>
                  >
                  > The trouble I have visualising it is with the plot structure. There are
                  > things that you can get away with in a cartoon. And in most Thundaar
                  > adventures really just happen by accident. Thundaar just happens to be
                  > passing through when the Wizard attacks the village or some threat emerges,
                  > they save day and hit the road once again. All in all I don't think my
                  > players would go for a campaign in which all the adventures occur by
                  > accident ( it's also never quite explained why Thundaar and co are always
                  > travelling).

                  One of the things that the Champions rules suggested was that you
                  could run a game in two modes... serial or episodic.

                  I would argue that Thundarr was an episodic cartoon... one cartoon
                  rarely had anything to do with the previous or next cartoon.

                  The question is, would you want to run your game that way, and would
                  your players enjoy that?

                  Personally, I would, but that's just me.
                • Soylent Green
                  I would have to be episodic if for no other reason that our gaming group only manages to meet up very irregularly.
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 9 1:24 AM
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                    I would have to be episodic if for no other reason that our gaming group
                    only manages to meet up very irregularly.

                    >One of the things that the Champions rules suggested was that you
                    >could run a game in two modes... serial or episodic.
                    >
                    >I would argue that Thundarr was an episodic cartoon... one cartoon
                    >rarely had anything to do with the previous or next cartoon.
                    >
                    >The question is, would you want to run your game that way, and would
                    >your players enjoy that?
                    >
                    >Personally, I would, but that's just me.
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