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Re: [gwmg] - Re: been so long, practically a newbie

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  • Reginald Blue
    ... You have anything that you can share for that? That sounds very interesting.
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 1, 2006
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      On 2/1/06, Mars <allshallworshipmeanddespair@...> wrote:
      I cobbled a patchwork system with GW 2nd
      Ed and d20 D&D core books. My players knew the D&D rules which made
      it easier for everyone. It seemed to keep the 'GW' feel.

      You have anything that you can share for that?  That sounds very interesting.
    • Soylent Green
      I ll get on topic soon, so just bear with me. Recently I was discussing among friends about games to run. We decided on a space opera game, and narrowed the
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 1, 2006
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        I'll get on topic soon, so just bear with me. Recently I was discussing
        among friends about games to run. We decided on a space opera game, and
        narrowed the option down to classic d6 Star Wars or the new 'Serenity' rpg
        (based on the Firefly series). We are all big Firefly fans, the system
        looked pretty good and being brand new, Serenity was really tempting. But it
        occurred to me that those same things that made Firefly outstanding as a TV
        show (the unheroic, no-frills style and the absence of alien races,
        glittering technological toys or other things to make you go wow) can make
        gaming a good deal harder.

        For example, in "Serenity" would have to work pretty hard to establish the
        character and credentials of a crimelord NPC. In Star Wars, you just need to
        suggest said crimelord NPC is "a Hutt" and the jobs down. It's corny, but by
        that device the GM can convey a lot of meaning to the player very
        economically. And it's not that we understand the Star Wars universe better
        than the Firefly 'Verse. It's the fact that in Star Wars things tend to
        simplified and exaggerated. It not subtle, but then subtle isn't always best
        when rolepalying games are concerned.

        And I was thinking this sort of thing might apply to Gamma World . Gamma
        World is not subtle, but it gives the GM a lot of freedom. The GM has the
        ability to cast an NPC as a mutant dog or a mutant scorpion and in doing so
        tell us something about that NPC's character (loyal or treacherous) without
        having to go into much detail. He can use artifacts from the present and the
        past in the plot which have symbolic value of some sort (say A heavy Metal
        CD, The Declaration of Independence, a bottle of vintage champagne) to us to
        also convey meaning.

        Contrary to popular belief, cliches are a roleplayers best friend.
        Role-playing is a messy activity. The players and the GM are all struggling
        to imagine the same thing, but inevitably each one sees it somewhat
        differently and the nuances are lost. Something like "Serenity" which is
        based on nuances is going to have a lot harder time than something like
        Gamma World which is designed to be loud, colourful and larger than life.

        Agree? Disagree?
      • artikid2002
        ... This is one of the truest sentences I ve read about game mastering, or at least one I can relate too 100% Regards Luigi
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 1, 2006
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          --- In gammaworld@yahoogroups.com, "Soylent Green" <gsoylent@h...> wrote:

          > Contrary to popular belief, cliches are a roleplayers best friend.
          > Role-playing is a messy activity.
          > Agree? Disagree?
          >
          This is one of the truest sentences I've read about game mastering, or
          at least one I can relate too 100%
          Regards
          Luigi
        • Elizabeth Woodward
          Without cliches you ve got nothing to use to define the game world and the PCs. You can of course turn a cliche on its head sometimes. Elizabeth W. ... This is
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 1, 2006
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            Without cliches you've got nothing to use to define the game world and the PCs. You can of course turn a cliche on its head sometimes.
             
            Elizabeth W.


            artikid2002 <artikid@...> wrote:
            --- In gammaworld@yahoogroups.com, "Soylent Green" <gsoylent@h...> wrote:

            > Contrary to popular belief, cliches are a roleplayers best friend.
            > Role-playing is a messy activity.
            > Agree? Disagree?
            >
            This is one of the truest sentences I've read about game mastering, or
            at least one I can relate too 100%
            Regards
            Luigi





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          • John Steele
            Dear Listees, ... as a TV ... can make ... -Possibly, but that depends on your audiance and the skill of the GM... ... life. ... -Again, it s not about a given
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 2, 2006
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              Dear Listees,
              --- In gammaworld@yahoogroups.com, "Soylent Green" <gsoylent@...> wrote:
              > But it
              > occurred to me that those same things that made Firefly outstanding
              as a TV
              > show (the unheroic, no-frills style and the absence of alien races,
              > glittering technological toys or other things to make you go wow)
              can make
              > gaming a good deal harder.

              -Possibly, but that depends on your audiance and the skill of the GM...


              > Something like "Serenity" which is
              > based on nuances is going to have a lot harder time than something like
              > Gamma World which is designed to be loud, colourful and larger than
              life.
              >
              > Agree? Disagree?

              -Again, it's not about a given setting's subtle flavors that can make
              the conveyance of the GM's thoughts difficult. It is the ability to
              effectively communicate a given idea to the players, with or without a
              standing level of experience that players may or may not have with the
              setting. If you can make players shiver when you describe the biting
              cold of winter, or hear the emotion in their words when the critical
              moment occurs, then you're doing just fine. It's all about the FUN...
              ;}~
            • Scott Webster
              I ve played Serenity several times recently, and I think as long as everyone in your own group has seen several of the episodes and the movie, there could be
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 2, 2006
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                I've played Serenity several times recently, and I think as long as
                everyone in your own group has seen several of the episodes and the
                movie, there could be plenty of cliches everyone would grasp.

                We have big fun swearing in Chinese. I looked up more phrases on the
                internet just so I could have a few that weren't in the book. Even
                though there aren't any character classes, we tended to fall into
                cliched roles similar to those in the shows. When we had a new player
                one evening, he identified two of the other players as acting
                like 'Janes'. We all busted up. It can be a fun game, especially if
                you're drawling, swaggering, spouting witticisms, and posturing like
                Mal or Jane.
              • Mars
                ... It is in the Files section under Mars puts stuff Here . It uses the 3 main D&D books. The Monster Manual has Anthropormorphic animal stats, and the DMG
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 9, 2006
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                  --- In gammaworld@yahoogroups.com, Reginald Blue <reginald.blue@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > On 2/1/06, Mars <allshallworshipmeanddespair@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I cobbled a patchwork system with GW 2nd
                  > > Ed and d20 D&D core books. My players knew the D&D rules which made
                  > > it easier for everyone. It seemed to keep the 'GW' feel.
                  >
                  >
                  > You have anything that you can share for that? That sounds very
                  > interesting.
                  >
                  It is in the Files section under 'Mars puts stuff Here'. It uses the 3
                  main D&D books. The Monster Manual has Anthropormorphic animal stats,
                  and the DMG has a brief section on modern and futurific weapons.
                  this is a lot sketchier than I had remembered it. One thing not
                  mentioned is that the rogue's skill 'Use Magic Item' is changed
                  to 'Understand Ancient Technology'. Someone else has
                  made a list of GW creatures with d20 stats so I did not finish the
                  creatures section. I probably found it here or at PA forge. I can post
                  it if desired.

                  I would appreciate any feedback on it.

                  Mars
                • Jory Earl
                  For anyone in the Portland/Vancouver area, I have a large box of notes and scenarios I wrote. You want, come and get. Free.
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 9, 2006
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                    For anyone in the Portland/Vancouver area, I have a large box of notes and
                    scenarios I wrote. You want, come and get. Free.
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