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The Book of Unwritten Tales

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  • Brandon Van Every
    http://bout.kingart-games.com/ I played the demo of this, and liked it enough that I might consider buying it, were it not for imminent self-imposed pressure
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 25, 2012
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      http://bout.kingart-games.com/ I played the demo of this, and liked
      it enough that I might consider buying it, were it not for imminent
      self-imposed pressure to do more programming. Maybe I'll loosen up at
      some point but not today. It's a point-and-click adventure game using
      a modern 3d engine to implement it. Characters, dialogue, and humor
      are reasonably good. I liked the fact that it was somewhat easy, so
      that I didn't have to spend a lot of time pulling my hair out and
      could just enjoy the narrative aspects. I also appreciated that the
      UI would let you highlight all the interest points in the scene, so
      that you don't have to tediously hunt and peck for whether something
      is usable or investigable. Many years ago I talked about the need for
      "puzzleless adventures" because the beat-your-head-against-a-wall
      medium seemed commercially dead. Perhaps "easy adventures" is a good
      design compromise.

      In other news I played the Tropico 4 demo, found it mildly
      interesting, but also futzy to play on my laptop mousepad and GeForce
      8600M GT card. I got tired of fighting the sluggish 3D and deleted
      it. I could have turned the 3D down to bare bones options and
      experimented with whether that would result in better playability, but
      it felt like work, so I didn't. I think city builder games need to
      plunk, plunk, plunk down the buildings fairly readily or they just
      don't work. I had similar issues with a futzy Rome city builder game
      whose name escapes me. Too much time aligning cameras and worrying
      about whether I was placing the buildings well enough. There's
      something to be said for those old school large 2D isometric grids
      where you can see exactly what goes where.


      Cheers,
      Brandon Van Every
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