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Re: [gamedesign-l] Coward - the CRPG

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  • Wismerhill
    ... No, no loot. You are fighting for your country, not a thief. Moral is safe. Missions consist in opening a safe, killing a target, protecting a man,
    Message 1 of 80 , Aug 1, 2003
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      Brandon J. Van Every wrote:

      > But do you steal loot in Splinter Cell? I suppose you could steal
      > classified documents or something.

      No, no loot. You are fighting for your country, not a thief. Moral is safe.
      Missions consist in opening a safe, killing a target, protecting a man,
      recording a distant conversation with a micro (funny one, when dogs are after
      you), and so on. Worth it, if you forgive the linearity of the levels and the
      story. Fortunately, the gameplay is rich enough and you can more or less create
      your own play style.

      You could also try Tenshu (1, 2 or 3, on ps1 and ps2), where you basically play
      a ninja, hu, assassin. Or the game I'm working on, if it goes out one day :-\,
      where you'll play a ninja, hu, assassin.

      --
      Wismerhill,
      http://www.xingstudios.com
    • John Ludlow
      ... note ... they ... immersed by ... certainly ... No, I don t either. Realism does contribute to it, but only if it s actually realistic. If it s /kinda/
      Message 80 of 80 , Aug 9, 2003
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        --- In gamedesign-l@yahoogroups.com, "Brandon J. Van Every"
        <vanevery@3...> wrote:
        > From: Rainer Deyke [mailto:rainerd@e...]
        > >
        > > To me, computer games often feel "more real" than books or
        > > movies.
        > >
        > > I agree that "realism" in computer games is the wrong
        > > approach.
        >
        > I define "immersion." Before I give my definition, I just want to
        note
        > that I actually define it. I think most of the game industry takes
        > "immersion" as an axiom that they don't have to think about, once
        they
        > utter that magic word. :-)
        >
        > I define "immersion" as psychological engagement to material. For
        > instance, a good book is immersive. I've also been totally
        immersed by
        > text MUDs, much moreso than any other gaming experience. I
        certainly
        > don't define it in terms of "realism,"

        No, I don't either. Realism does contribute to it, but only if it's
        actually realistic. If it's /kinda/ realistic (like, say, MOH), but
        not really, then there's no point.
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