Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

losing

Expand Messages
  • Brandon J. Van Every
    ... What s so bad about just getting summarily nuked, thereby ending your suffering? Do you bitch and moan when playing tennis against someone who s clearly a
    Message 1 of 125 , Feb 28, 2001
      > If the players can attempt to do something about these nukes then it
      > increases tension. If they can't then it leads to the "I'm sick of
      > this - you win" scenario before the game is actually completed.
      >
      > *That* sucks.

      What's so bad about just getting summarily nuked, thereby ending your
      suffering? Do you bitch and moan when playing tennis against someone who's
      clearly a lot better than you, or do you attempt to learn from the
      experience? Do we design a game for people who don't want to put hours of
      practice into being good at it? That certainly wouldn't be tennis, and
      consider how trivial the rules of tennis are. The complexity comes from the
      players, not the game rules. I think there's a big question of how much
      pandering to player ego we really need, vs. just forcing "sportsmanship."
      Sportsmanship says it's ok for there to be winners and losers, because it's
      a game.

      If getting nukes was random, yes I'd have a problem with it. I don't think
      shuffling a deck of cards and waiting to see who's the first to draw an Ace
      of Spades is much of a game. But getting nukes in these games is never
      random, there's always some known mechanism you have to go through to
      acquire the nukes. What do you want, reminders for the attention
      challenged? "Hey dumbass, your opponent is using early 20th century
      technology. Mighn't you be worried about your sunblock level?"



      Cheers, www.3DProgrammer.com
      Brandon Van Every Seattle, WA

      For plot and pace, writers use words; game designers use numbers.
      Anything understood over time has plot and pace.
    • John Ludlow
      What have the mechanisms been like in real life? The promise of unbelievable wealth (oil, gold, spice)? Basically, you are asking why don t nations grow in
      Message 125 of 125 , Mar 28, 2001
        What have the mechanisms been like in real life? The promise of unbelievable
        wealth (oil, gold, spice)?

        Basically, you are asking "why don't nations grow in one big city?" You are
        very close, but these resources are rare (geographically), so a game
        shouldn't rely too much on them.

        Farmland for food would be a more common reason for expansion, or a source
        of building materials. These are important items, in heavy demand, and a
        person with access to them in large quantities could become very wealthy
        very quickly. Other resources may play a part.

        Another reason is interaction with other races. A person being able to
        provide items not available in their homeland (such as jewels, rare food,
        or technology) could also become wealthy. Now this in itself does not
        directly cause new cities to be set up, but it does cause expansion of your
        population, and way-stations may be set up to take advantage of merchants
        moving between cities.

        In addition, certain civilizations may be slightly xenophobic, forcing
        merchants to set up smaller enclosures outside a city. In theory, these
        could act like embassies, which count as the owning country's soil. In
        other words, if you set up one of these enclosures, it would be like a
        small city, as people would live there, and it would have its own services
        (subject to certain local laws, of course). Hmmm, how to model this, though?

        But you also have to remember that, when many of these settlements were set
        up, they were independent (especially somewhere like Greece) and not always
        friendly to each other. An independent city may have split up, with the
        more passive faction being forced out to set up camp elsewhere.

        Lastly, as you mention, the government may offer incentives for settling in
        a certain area.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.