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Re: [gamebooks] Re: gamebook selling

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  • Dale A. Baker
    I agree.  The only accurate list that could be generated from eBay would always be in flux like a stock ticker, indicating the current value and how it
    Message 1 of 21 , Jan 6, 2009
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      I agree.� The only accurate list that could be generated from eBay would always be in flux�like a stock ticker, indicating the current�value and how it changed from day/week/auction.� Since eBay keeps that information in-house, about the only way it could be accurately determined, from outside the company, would be with something like ItsDeductible, which may or may not be specific enough to provide a value based on eBay's data.�

      eBay has a lot of dissatisfied users, these days, too, so a number of buyers have been going to alternative services, which reduces eBay's data pool and accuracy.

      Dale

      ---
      You may not be interested in the digital rights war, but that doesn't mean you'll have the luxury of sitting on the sidelines. Because the other side is very, very interested in you. - Bruce Sterling

      --- On Tue, 1/6/09, efroriz <efroriz@...> wrote:

      From: efroriz <efroriz@...>
      Subject: [gamebooks] Re: gamebook selling
      To: gamebooks@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, January 6, 2009, 8:09 AM






      My personal experience tells me that it is possible to get the
      majority of so-called "rare" gamebooks at prices much lower than most
      people would like you to believe. And this on eBay, not at obscure
      resellers. I have seen literally the same book sell for stellar prices
      one day and for less than half that a week later, so there's clearly
      no logic behind prices, and any pricing list you could write would be
      arbitrary - that's why I hope nobody will write one, as general
      consensus on somebody's idea is what ultimately defines "reality".

      I can tell that, for example, Mark Spezzano's Demonspawn 4 will hardly
      find a buyer at that price: I myself paid 3 or 4 times less for it. I
      agree that it's a book you don't see on eBay every other week, but
      that is a very high price even for some of the rarest pieces.

      In the two years since I began searching eBay for gamebooks, I have
      seen lots of craziness and contradiction. I have seen people pay well
      over a hundred GBP for ex-library copies of Lone Wolf 28, which is
      probably the most-wanted gamebook around and everything, but that's a
      price I would pay (maybe) for a mint copy. On the other hand, I saw a
      copy of Buccaneers of Shadaki go for about 90 quids, and one month
      later I won mine for about 40 quids, which I can consider an absolute
      bargain for this book after seeing the average price it goes for. I
      have also bought a very good copy of Puffin FF59 for about 10 GBP,
      while many people used to consider this book unfoundable until the
      Wizard re-issue came out. And last summer I saw (and, unfortunately,
      couldn't bid for) a VG copy of Blood Sword 3 go for just �3, and a
      Grailquest 8 for around �8. All this happened on eBay: I would rule
      second-hand- shop prices out of the list of true bargains, because I
      know some people have found their copy of Sejanoz there for 20p,
      something that will never happen on the Internet no matter how
      oblivious the seller is of the book's quotations. That's no bargain,
      that's dumb luck :-)

      So you see, the price at which every single copy is sold just reflects
      the price that the buyer agrees to pay, and not some intrinsic value
      of the book itself. That's why my suggestion for all eBay sellers is
      to start from a very low price, because that way people WILL consider
      their auctions, and the final price will probably be satisfactory
      anyway. A high starting price will drive many bidders away instead -
      consider that copy of LW25 that's floating around eBay: I'm very
      interested in the book, but I'd never spend the equivalent of �85 that
      the seller is asking as starting price.

      Then there are books that you see much, much less than even the most
      sought-after LW and FF, yet I strongly believe than nobody would pay
      high prices for them, and that's just because they're not famous
      books. Of course I won't say which books I'm thinking about here - I'm
      still after them myself!

      As a final note, I can say that people going after books in English
      probably never equalled the craziness of many gamebook buyers I saw on
      eBay Italy, where every single copy of the Italian edition of Stephen
      Thraves' "Cup Heroes" never goes for less than 200 Euros, and in at
      least two occasions was sold for more than 400 Euros!


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • robert.a.mammone@nab.com.au
      ... 15 ... Usually ... I m not sure about that, I think they generally go for something in the 20s on eBay though higher on places like amazon and abebooks. I
      Message 2 of 21 , Jan 6, 2009
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        > > FF 57 and 58 are by far the rarest. I snatched a copy of each at
        15
        > > quid apiece and while it hurt, I think I was pretty lucky.
        Usually
        > > a copy of either sells in the range of 40-45 quid or more.

        I'm not sure about that, I think they generally go for something in
        the 20s on eBay though higher on places like amazon and abebooks. I
        got FF57 for 4.75 on eBay and FF58 for about £14 I think. FF59 cost me
        £18 but that was before the re-issue.

        That sounds about right. I've found and sold 2 copies of FF58 (the
        vampire one) and haven't got more than GBP25 for each. But, since they
        cost a couple of $, who am I to complain?

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      • Guillermo Paredes
        Well, my estimates come from years of keeping watch over prices. Yes, you can find them cheaper but only on occasion. Guillermo ... De:: Kieran Coghlan
        Message 3 of 21 , Jan 7, 2009
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          Well, my estimates come from years of keeping watch over prices. Yes, you can find them cheaper but only on occasion.


          Guillermo


          --- El mar 6-ene-09, Kieran Coghlan <herc_freak@...> escribió:
          De:: Kieran Coghlan <herc_freak@...>
          Asunto: [gamebooks] Re: gamebook selling
          A: gamebooks@yahoogroups.com
          Fecha: martes, 6 enero, 2009, 4:59 am











          > > FF 57 and 58 are by far the rarest. I snatched a copy of each at

          15

          > > quid apiece and while it hurt, I think I was pretty lucky.

          Usually

          > > a copy of either sells in the range of 40-45 quid or more.



          I'm not sure about that, I think they generally go for something in

          the 20s on eBay though higher on places like amazon and abebooks. I

          got FF57 for 4.75 on eBay and FF58 for about £14 I think. FF59 cost me

          £18 but that was before the re-issue.


























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        • Guillermo Paredes
          Well, some of the rarest Holy Grials of gamebook collecting are the Italian Galactic Foundation Games. The rarity of those makes LW 22 pale in comparison. Do I
          Message 4 of 21 , Jan 7, 2009
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            Well, some of the rarest Holy Grials of gamebook collecting are the Italian Galactic Foundation Games. The rarity of those makes LW 22 pale in comparison. Do I get a sock full of candy or something like that for guessing some books you might be after?


            Guillermo



            --- El mar 6-ene-09, efroriz <efroriz@...> escribió:
            De:: efroriz <efroriz@...>
            Asunto: [gamebooks] Re: gamebook selling
            A: gamebooks@yahoogroups.com
            Fecha: martes, 6 enero, 2009, 8:09 am











            My personal experience tells me that it is possible to get the

            majority of so-called "rare" gamebooks at prices much lower than most

            people would like you to believe. And this on eBay, not at obscure

            resellers. I have seen literally the same book sell for stellar prices

            one day and for less than half that a week later, so there's clearly

            no logic behind prices, and any pricing list you could write would be

            arbitrary - that's why I hope nobody will write one, as general

            consensus on somebody's idea is what ultimately defines "reality".



            I can tell that, for example, Mark Spezzano's Demonspawn 4 will hardly

            find a buyer at that price: I myself paid 3 or 4 times less for it. I

            agree that it's a book you don't see on eBay every other week, but

            that is a very high price even for some of the rarest pieces.



            In the two years since I began searching eBay for gamebooks, I have

            seen lots of craziness and contradiction. I have seen people pay well

            over a hundred GBP for ex-library copies of Lone Wolf 28, which is

            probably the most-wanted gamebook around and everything, but that's a

            price I would pay (maybe) for a mint copy. On the other hand, I saw a

            copy of Buccaneers of Shadaki go for about 90 quids, and one month

            later I won mine for about 40 quids, which I can consider an absolute

            bargain for this book after seeing the average price it goes for. I

            have also bought a very good copy of Puffin FF59 for about 10 GBP,

            while many people used to consider this book unfoundable until the

            Wizard re-issue came out. And last summer I saw (and, unfortunately,

            couldn't bid for) a VG copy of Blood Sword 3 go for just £3, and a

            Grailquest 8 for around £8. All this happened on eBay: I would rule

            second-hand- shop prices out of the list of true bargains, because I

            know some people have found their copy of Sejanoz there for 20p,

            something that will never happen on the Internet no matter how

            oblivious the seller is of the book's quotations. That's no bargain,

            that's dumb luck :-)



            So you see, the price at which every single copy is sold just reflects

            the price that the buyer agrees to pay, and not some intrinsic value

            of the book itself. That's why my suggestion for all eBay sellers is

            to start from a very low price, because that way people WILL consider

            their auctions, and the final price will probably be satisfactory

            anyway. A high starting price will drive many bidders away instead -

            consider that copy of LW25 that's floating around eBay: I'm very

            interested in the book, but I'd never spend the equivalent of €85 that

            the seller is asking as starting price.



            Then there are books that you see much, much less than even the most

            sought-after LW and FF, yet I strongly believe than nobody would pay

            high prices for them, and that's just because they're not famous

            books. Of course I won't say which books I'm thinking about here - I'm

            still after them myself!



            As a final note, I can say that people going after books in English

            probably never equalled the craziness of many gamebook buyers I saw on

            eBay Italy, where every single copy of the Italian edition of Stephen

            Thraves' "Cup Heroes" never goes for less than 200 Euros, and in at

            least two occasions was sold for more than 400 Euros!


























            __________________________________________________
            Correo Yahoo!
            Espacio para todos tus mensajes, antivirus y antispam ¡gratis!
            Regístrate ya - http://correo.yahoo.com.mx/

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • efroriz
            No Guillermo, you missed the target entirely :-) I have completed the Asimov Galactic Foundation gamebooks series just recently, and actually they aren t that
            Message 5 of 21 , Jan 8, 2009
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              No Guillermo, you missed the target entirely :-) I have completed the
              Asimov Galactic Foundation gamebooks series just recently, and
              actually they aren't that rare, if you consider that there's
              proportionately less people interested in buying them than people
              after LW22. I could say that the last 2 Asimovs are as scarce as
              Buccaneers, but not more. It's much, much harder to find copies of
              Falcon 4, 5 and 6 in Italian, for example - that's why I got the
              series in English! :-D



              --- In gamebooks@yahoogroups.com, Guillermo Paredes <gparedes76@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Well, some of the rarest Holy Grials of gamebook collecting are the
              Italian Galactic Foundation Games. The rarity of those makes LW 22
              pale in comparison. Do I get a sock full of candy or something like
              that for guessing some books you might be after?
              >
              >
              > Guillermo
            • Guillermo
              ... The truth is that I did not intend to make this a discussion about supply and demand. My comment was more in the direction of not seeing sense in spending
              Message 6 of 21 , Jan 8, 2009
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                --- In gamebooks@yahoogroups.com, Ben <yahoo@...> wrote:
                >
                > I think the high prices might be due partly to the convenience factor
                > and partly the bidding frenzy from the non-snipers. As a percentage
                > how much more do you think they are going for over their worth?
                >


                The truth is that I did not intend to make this a discussion about
                supply and demand. My comment was more in the direction of not seeing
                sense in spending a month's worth of my retirement fund in a single
                gaming book.


                Guillermo
              • Gabriel Seah
                ... Their prices can only go up, and seeing how the markets have been doing, it might bring better returns than your retirement fund =D
                Message 7 of 21 , Jan 9, 2009
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                  > The truth is that I did not intend to make this a discussion about
                  > supply and demand. My comment was more in the direction of not seeing
                  > sense in spending a month's worth of my retirement fund in a single
                  > gaming book.

                  Their prices can only go up, and seeing how the markets have been
                  doing, it might bring better returns than your retirement fund =D
                • Guillermo
                  ... that these books cultural and sentimental value far outweigh their economic value to me (I don t doubt they could be a valuable asset, though). The school
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jan 10, 2009
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                    --- In gamebooks@yahoogroups.com, "Gabriel Seah" <gabrielseah@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Their prices can only go up, and seeing how the markets have been
                    > doing, it might bring better returns than your retirement fund =D
                    >



                    :) Usually I would have said "touche", but the truth of the matter is
                    that these books' cultural and sentimental value far outweigh their
                    economic value to me (I don't doubt they could be a valuable asset,
                    though). The school of hard knocks has taught me that parting with
                    these books is a choice I would only regret later.

                    Another factor is that, unlike the Brits and Aussies here, I don't
                    live in a country where you can throw a rock and very likely hit a
                    wagon full of the things. If I sell a gamebook, I know beforehand that
                    I'll go through a lot of trouble to find another copy later. That's
                    another reason why I personally don't like to think of them as
                    merchandise.


                    Guillermo
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