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Good Game Music?

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  • Lee, Chia Chin
    Welcome to the list! This list just started last night, and I m glad to have people join already. Anyway, to get the ball rolling, I ll start out with a couple
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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      Welcome to the list!
      This list just started last night, and I'm glad to have people join already.

      Anyway, to get the ball rolling, I'll start out with a couple of questions:

      1) I'm curious to find out if you guys have played any games recently that
      blew you away in terms of the game music or sound design.

      2) Also, I wouldn't mind a few introductions and tooting of your own horn.
      Tell us what about your gear, job, or
      any products that you have worked or are working on.
    • Mitch Brink
      ... I just bought Goldeneye (N64) and I am TOTALLY blown away by the clarity and punch of the sound fx. The musical arrangements and execution are also
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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        Lee, Chia Chin wrote:

        > 1) I'm curious to find out if you guys have played any games recently that
        > blew you away in terms of the game music or sound design.

        I just bought Goldeneye (N64) and I am TOTALLY blown away by the clarity and
        "punch" of the sound fx.
        The musical arrangements and execution are also excellent.


        > 2) Also, I wouldn't mind a few introductions and tooting of your own horn.
        > Tell us what about your gear, job, or
        > any products that you have worked or are working on.
        >

        My name is Mitch Brink, and I'm a freelance composer/sound designer (although
        I'm a relative newbie to sound design).
        I've done GM scores for Neophyte: Koplio's Story, Hovertank, The Voyage, and a
        Redbook score for DefCon Cow.

        Being freelance makes it a bit difficult to find work. I'm happy working out of
        my own office/studio, and have plans to take a salaried job that requires me to
        relocate.

        I hope to get more freelance work as game producers realize that geography is
        not relevant to the quality of one's work. :-)

        Gear: Alesis QS+, Ensoniq EPS16+, Korg 01/W, various rack effects/processors,
        Mackie SR24 mixer, Roland RD 300 digital piano, Cakewalk Pro Audio, Sound Forge,
        Cool Edit Pro.

        Gear that I want: K2500 loaded. ;)


        --
        ______________________________________________________________________
        Mitch Brink, Keyboardist/ Composer
        E-mail: mitchb2@...
        WWW: http://www.geocities.com/~mitchb2/
      • Lee, Chia Chin
        Does geography affect the wage you can command, even though you re a freelancer? For example, if you took an assignment from New York, and you live in Kenosha,
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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          Does geography affect the wage you can command, even though you're a
          freelancer?
          For example, if you took an assignment from New York, and you live in
          Kenosha, Ilinois, do you ask for the New York rates, or the Kenosha rates?


          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Mitch Brink [SMTP:mitchb2@...]
          > Sent: Thursday, September 03, 1998 11:30 AM
          > To: gameaudiopro@onelist.com
          > Subject: [gameaudiopro] Re: Good Game Music?
          >
          > From: Mitch Brink <mitchb2@...>
          >
          > Being freelance makes it a bit difficult to find work. I'm happy working
          > out of
          > my own office/studio, and have plans to take a salaried job that requires
          > me to
          > relocate.
          >
          > I hope to get more freelance work as game producers realize that geography
          > is
          > not relevant to the quality of one's work. :-)
          >
        • dpaulsen
          ... Hiya, nice to be here. Believe it or not, Quake-II still has some of the best/high-quality sounds I ve heard in awhile. The railgun really sounds like
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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            > From: "Lee, Chia Chin" <CCLee@...>
            >
            > Anyway, to get the ball rolling, I'll start out with a couple of
            > questions:
            >
            > 1) I'm curious to find out if you guys have played any games recently that
            > blew you away in terms of the game music or sound design.

            Hiya, nice to be here.

            Believe it or not, Quake-II still has some of the best/high-quality sounds
            I've heard in awhile. The railgun really sounds like you've got a big
            dangerous pile-driving machine-o-death jammed in your shoulder when it
            fires. The ambient hum it generates is a beeeeutiful touch. The other
            weapons are equally well-tuned and just sound *right*.

            UnReal was an audio disappointment. Everything sounded tinny and... uh..
            unreal. The weapons you'd expect to thump you hard (the eightball gun,
            especially) sound silly. Where I'd expect my woofers to bottom out they
            barely move. I've been tempted a few times to remix the sounds myself and
            boost the bass...

            For good ambient background music, I like Master of Orion II's etherial
            soundtrack. I can listen to that for hours without it becoming annoying or
            intrusive, yet when it kicks into "tactical mode" it gets the heart
            pounding. By contrast, Command & Conquor's music is good for one or two
            listens but then I shut it off due to its intrusive nature.

            X-COM I has the best creepy/disturbing soundtrack I've ever heard. I had
            nightmares for weeks when that game first came out, and I attribute a lot of
            it to the music.

            Carmageddon's music (courtesy of Fear Factory) is so good I burned a
            music-only version of the CD for my car. I prefer those devocalized
            versions of the tracks that ship with Carmageddon to the actual Fear Factory
            albums. I REALLY hope they keep FF on for Carpocalypse.

            I liked Full Throttle's soundtrack so much I hunted down the Gone Jackals
            and bought their album. It, too, is in my car for late-night high-speed
            rental movie returns.

            > 2) Also, I wouldn't mind a few introductions and tooting of your own horn.
            > Tell us what about your gear, job, or
            > any products that you have worked or are working on.

            My name's David Paulsen, and I'm a hobbyist, I guess. In other words, some
            projects completed for my own amusement but nothing published.

            I love science fiction strategy games, of the space warfare/resource
            management sub-species. My current project is converting a 16-bit single
            player thingie I wrote to 32-bit multiplayer. Convert? More like
            rewrite-from-scratch-but-keep-the-art...

            My dabbling in sound has been restricted (so far) to the mechanics of making
            DirectX work with my apps, and creatively smashing samples together with
            CoolEdit. Slice'n'splice, add some filters, and you have explosions and
            weapons-discharge sounds in space, where physics dictates there should be
            none. :-P

            Seriously, I would love some pointers on how best to proceed with a new
            sound requirement. Is creative sound nothing more than banging pots
            together, recording the results and filtering everything to within an inch
            of its life?

            Thanks,
            David
            --
            dpaulsen@...

            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > Help support ONElist, while generating interest in your product or
            > service. ONElist has a variety of advertising packages. Visit
            > http://www.onelist.com/advert.html for more information.
            >
          • Lee, Chia Chin
            I think good sound design is manipulating real sounds to create believable non-existant or exaggerated in-game sounds. Foley artists strive to *re-create*
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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              I think good sound design is manipulating "real" sounds to create believable
              non-existant or exaggerated in-game sounds.
              Foley artists strive to *re-create* reality (woman walking on concrete with
              high-heel), but sound designers *create* reality (giant bats gnawing on the
              entrails of a dinosaur). Most people who handle sfx for games perform both
              taks.
              I think the most important repetoire of a good sound designer is aural
              imagination. That is, to imagine sounds being used fluently in another
              context. For example, boots stepping in mud could be altered to sound like
              a phlegmy monster breathing.

              Any other thoughts on the music for Unreal?
              I too was a bit disappointed in it.
              I think the unfortunate part about MOD music is that you can always tell
              that it was created with a tracker!
              ...and the "interactive" part wasn't the impressive either. I guess I was
              just expecting too much. :)

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: dpaulsen [SMTP:dpaulsen@...]
              > Sent: Thursday, September 03, 1998 11:36 AM
              > To: gameaudiopro@onelist.com
              > Subject: [gameaudiopro] Re: Good Game Music?
              >
              > From: "dpaulsen" <dpaulsen@...>
              >
              > > From: "Lee, Chia Chin" <CCLee@...>
              > >
              > > Anyway, to get the ball rolling, I'll start out with a couple of
              > > questions:
              > >
              > > 1) I'm curious to find out if you guys have played any games recently
              > that
              > > blew you away in terms of the game music or sound design.
              >
              > Hiya, nice to be here.
              >
              > Believe it or not, Quake-II still has some of the best/high-quality sounds
              > I've heard in awhile. The railgun really sounds like you've got a big
              > dangerous pile-driving machine-o-death jammed in your shoulder when it
              > fires. The ambient hum it generates is a beeeeutiful touch. The other
              > weapons are equally well-tuned and just sound *right*.
              >
              > UnReal was an audio disappointment. Everything sounded tinny and... uh..
              > unreal. The weapons you'd expect to thump you hard (the eightball gun,
              > especially) sound silly. Where I'd expect my woofers to bottom out they
              > barely move. I've been tempted a few times to remix the sounds myself and
              > boost the bass...
              >
              > For good ambient background music, I like Master of Orion II's etherial
              > soundtrack. I can listen to that for hours without it becoming annoying
              > or
              > intrusive, yet when it kicks into "tactical mode" it gets the heart
              > pounding. By contrast, Command & Conquor's music is good for one or two
              > listens but then I shut it off due to its intrusive nature.
              >
              > X-COM I has the best creepy/disturbing soundtrack I've ever heard. I had
              > nightmares for weeks when that game first came out, and I attribute a lot
              > of
              > it to the music.
              >
              > Carmageddon's music (courtesy of Fear Factory) is so good I burned a
              > music-only version of the CD for my car. I prefer those devocalized
              > versions of the tracks that ship with Carmageddon to the actual Fear
              > Factory
              > albums. I REALLY hope they keep FF on for Carpocalypse.
              >
              > I liked Full Throttle's soundtrack so much I hunted down the Gone Jackals
              > and bought their album. It, too, is in my car for late-night high-speed
              > rental movie returns.
              >
              > > 2) Also, I wouldn't mind a few introductions and tooting of your own
              > horn.
              > > Tell us what about your gear, job, or
              > > any products that you have worked or are working on.
              >
              > My name's David Paulsen, and I'm a hobbyist, I guess. In other words,
              > some
              > projects completed for my own amusement but nothing published.
              >
              > I love science fiction strategy games, of the space warfare/resource
              > management sub-species. My current project is converting a 16-bit single
              > player thingie I wrote to 32-bit multiplayer. Convert? More like
              > rewrite-from-scratch-but-keep-the-art...
              >
              > My dabbling in sound has been restricted (so far) to the mechanics of
              > making
              > DirectX work with my apps, and creatively smashing samples together with
              > CoolEdit. Slice'n'splice, add some filters, and you have explosions and
              > weapons-discharge sounds in space, where physics dictates there should be
              > none. :-P
              >
              > Seriously, I would love some pointers on how best to proceed with a new
              > sound requirement. Is creative sound nothing more than banging pots
              > together, recording the results and filtering everything to within an inch
              > of its life?
              >
              > Thanks,
              > David
              > --
              > dpaulsen@...
              >
              > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > > Help support ONElist, while generating interest in your product or
              > > service. ONElist has a variety of advertising packages. Visit
              > > http://www.onelist.com/advert.html for more information.
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > Help support ONElist, while generating interest in your product or
              > service. ONElist has a variety of advertising packages. Visit
              > http://www.onelist.com/advert.html for more information.
            • Mitch Brink
              ... Hmmm....I don t think of like that, really. I charge my rates. With each project, I get a little better in terms of composition, arrangement, as well as
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                Lee, Chia Chin wrote:

                > Does geography affect the wage you can command, even though you're a
                > freelancer?
                > For example, if you took an assignment from New York, and you live in
                > Kenosha, Ilinois, do you ask for the New York rates, or the Kenosha rates?
                >

                Hmmm....I don't think of like that, really. I charge "my" rates.
                With each project, I get a little better in terms of composition, arrangement,
                as well as producing/engineering.
                So, with each project, my rates go up a little more. :-)

                Hopefully this list will be populated by some folks who have done PSX/N64
                development....I'd love to hear what it takes hardware/software wise to do music
                for those platforms.


                --
                ______________________________________________________________________
                Mitch Brink, Keyboardist/ Composer
                E-mail: mitchb2@...
                WWW: http://www.geocities.com/~mitchb2/
              • Ryan Harris
                I think experimentation is also a key factor in sound design. What you come up with might not be what you need, but you might be able to use it later or with
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                  I think experimentation is also a key factor in sound design. What you
                  come up with might not be what you need, but you might be able to use it
                  later or with something else. Creativity is of utmost importance. I
                  like live sampling. Who would have ever though of sampling a vaccuum
                  cleaner then transposing it down an octave to get a great space-aged
                  elevator sound or an octave up to get a robotic movement sound. The
                  speeder bike in Star Wars was an air drill with a rock stuck in it,
                  sampled right out front of the studio. Keeping your ears open at all
                  times is important in my opinion as well.

                  Tracker music quality is getting better. The programmers are realizing
                  that people want to use better samples. I use IT v2.14 and have played
                  live with it. It sounded great. IT was a big step up from Scream
                  Tracker. I used Scream tracker for three years and made the switch over
                  a year ago and am not going back. Live performance is a bit different
                  then game music, but I know someone who released a CD using only a
                  tracker. The great thing about trackers is you have the music playing
                  realtime. My old programmer would sync portions of the program to
                  certain dumby notes in my sequences to trigger events. It's like Ghetto
                  SMPTE :) It was very cool to have an explosion perfectly synced to the
                  appropriate sound instead of hearing the sound then seeing what happens
                  (I am talking back in the day using a slow 486 PC).

                  This is a cool list! I haven't done music or FX in a game for quite a
                  while (2 years), but I definitly want to. Funny, my music gets better,
                  but I don't have as many oppourtunities as I used to...

                  Ryan

                  >I think good sound design is manipulating "real" sounds to create
                  believable
                  >non-existant or exaggerated in-game sounds.
                  >Foley artists strive to *re-create* reality (woman walking on concrete
                  with
                  >high-heel), but sound designers *create* reality (giant bats gnawing on
                  the
                  >entrails of a dinosaur). Most people who handle sfx for games perform
                  both
                  >taks.
                  >I think the most important repetoire of a good sound designer is aural
                  >imagination. That is, to imagine sounds being used fluently in another
                  >context. For example, boots stepping in mud could be altered to sound
                  like
                  >a phlegmy monster breathing.
                  >
                  >Any other thoughts on the music for Unreal?
                  >I too was a bit disappointed in it.
                  >I think the unfortunate part about MOD music is that you can always
                  tell
                  >that it was created with a tracker!
                  >...and the "interactive" part wasn't the impressive either. I guess I
                  was
                  >just expecting too much. :)
                • dpaulsen
                  ... As far as I m concerned, Unreal was a total bust. The 3D engine may be a technological marvel, but as a *game* it sucks hard. No product could have lived
                  Message 8 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                    > From: "Lee, Chia Chin" <CCLee@...>
                    >
                    > Any other thoughts on the music for Unreal?
                    > I too was a bit disappointed in it.
                    > I think the unfortunate part about MOD music is that you can always tell
                    > that it was created with a tracker!
                    > ...and the "interactive" part wasn't the impressive either. I guess I was
                    > just expecting too much. :)

                    As far as I'm concerned, Unreal was a total bust. The 3D engine may be a
                    technological marvel, but as a *game* it sucks hard. No product could have
                    lived up to the hype, but that doesn't excuse the fact that Unreal's entire
                    reason for being was to out-Quake Quake.

                    At least Quake-II had Rob Zombie do a real soundtrack. Unreal's music is
                    the same relentlessly silly techno stuff that plagues 3/4 of the shooters
                    out there.

                    BTW, if you want a totally breakout DIFFERENT kind of soundtrack, listen to
                    Rocket Jockey. Dick Dale recorded a completely original instrumental surf
                    soundtrack that stands on its own. I got tired of RJ a few months back,
                    but still listen to it as a musical CD. THAT's quality.

                    David
                  • dpaulsen
                    ... Here s a really silly question from a raw newbie... How *do* you capture live sounds? I mean besides the obvious tactic of a $12.95 RadioShack cassette
                    Message 9 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                      > From: "Ryan Harris" <r0cketscientist@...>
                      >
                      > I think experimentation is also a key factor in sound design. What you
                      > come up with might not be what you need, but you might be able to use it
                      > later or with something else. Creativity is of utmost importance. I
                      > like live sampling. Who would have ever though of sampling a vaccuum
                      > cleaner then transposing it down an octave to get a great space-aged
                      > elevator sound or an octave up to get a robotic movement sound. The
                      > speeder bike in Star Wars was an air drill with a rock stuck in it,
                      > sampled right out front of the studio. Keeping your ears open at all
                      > times is important in my opinion as well.

                      Here's a really silly question from a raw newbie...

                      How *do* you capture live sounds? I mean besides the obvious tactic
                      of a $12.95 RadioShack cassette recorder held next to the vaccuum
                      cleaner or snarling pitbull or whatever... isn't there some magical
                      gear that makes a difference?

                      I've seen "Movie Magic" specials on TLC where they show foley guys
                      strapped to 100-pound backpacks of sound gear, monster headphones,
                      boom mikes, and (I guess) hours of patience standing in a rice
                      paddy waiting for the ultimate insect sound. Or whatever.

                      That's beyond my means, I'm afraid.

                      What's a good, cheap, alternative?

                      Thanks,
                      David
                    • Lee, Chia Chin
                      A good stereo microphone and a portable DAT deck can go a long way. Another good, cheap alternative is a portable MINIDISC player. The sound quality is good
                      Message 10 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                        A good stereo microphone and a portable DAT deck can go a long way.
                        Another good, cheap alternative is a portable MINIDISC player. The sound
                        quality is good enough for capturing sound, and it's also quite small.

                        Personally though, I enjoy manipulating and synthesizing sound more than
                        capturing sound. Although I do record stuff, I get a lot done by processing
                        the hell out of sound effects libraries on CDs and creating ambiences on
                        analogue synths...


                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: dpaulsen [SMTP:dpaulsen@...]
                        > Sent: Thursday, September 03, 1998 4:40 PM
                        > To: gameaudiopro@onelist.com
                        > Subject: [gameaudiopro] Re: Good Game Music?
                        >
                        > From: "dpaulsen" <dpaulsen@...>
                        >
                        > Here's a really silly question from a raw newbie...
                        >
                        > How *do* you capture live sounds? I mean besides the obvious tactic
                        > of a $12.95 RadioShack cassette recorder held next to the vaccuum
                        > cleaner or snarling pitbull or whatever... isn't there some magical
                        > gear that makes a difference?
                        >
                        > I've seen "Movie Magic" specials on TLC where they show foley guys
                        > strapped to 100-pound backpacks of sound gear, monster headphones,
                        > boom mikes, and (I guess) hours of patience standing in a rice
                        > paddy waiting for the ultimate insect sound. Or whatever.
                        >
                        > That's beyond my means, I'm afraid.
                        >
                        > What's a good, cheap, alternative?
                        >
                        > Thanks,
                        > David
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        > To unsubscribe from this mailing list, or to change your subscription
                        > to digest, go to the ONElist web site, at http://www.onelist.com and
                        > select the User Center link from the menu bar on the left.
                      • Mitch Brink
                        ... Check out the Demo s section of http://www.geocities.com/~mitchb2/ heh heh heh -- ______________________________________________________________________
                        Message 11 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                          dpaulsen wrote:

                          > Unreal's music is the same relentlessly silly techno stuff that plagues 3/4
                          > of the shooters
                          > out there.
                          >

                          Check out the "Demo's" section of http://www.geocities.com/~mitchb2/

                          heh heh heh


                          --
                          ______________________________________________________________________
                          Mitch Brink, Keyboardist/ Composer
                          E-mail: mitchb2@...
                          WWW: http://www.geocities.com/~mitchb2/
                        • tanman
                          For me a good place to buy Sound FX (until i get enough to buy a sound fx library, Chia, wanna make a donation?) is Sounddogs.com. From there i process the
                          Message 12 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                            For me a good place to buy Sound FX (until i get enough to buy a sound fx
                            library, Chia, wanna make a donation?) is Sounddogs.com. From there i "process
                            the hell" out them also... soon enough however i plan to get either a portable
                            DAT deck or a portable Mini-disk deck.
                            There was no real meaning to this post, other than to say that i love this
                            idea, good job Chia, for those of you who've seen my name in
                            comp.games.development.audio, i'm gonna post here from now on. i also have a few
                            question and statements here they are:
                            Statement: Having just watched the movie Robin Hood: Men in tights, i went
                            upstairs to play Daggerfall and realized that the sound of a door or gate
                            opening in Daggerfall was the exact same sound used in the last scene in the
                            movie when the tower's ("he's gonna deflower her, in the tower!") door opens...
                            Question: What is a good way to get sword effects, the foley way? i was thinking
                            metal bars but they don't get the "clash of steel" that i want... any ideas?
                            also, i want to do rain noises, but i don't want it to be so over powering, i
                            want the visuals of rain to do most of the "talking" so to speak and just
                            ocasionally have a rain sound, maybe like a continual brown noise in the
                            background, very low, would do the trick, then have it cut whenever the
                            character goes inside, or have the pitch and volume change to reflect the rain
                            on the roof.... but i don't want it to sound like a torrential down poor, thats
                            over doing it with sfx.
                            Question: does anyone have any SFX libraries that they'd sell me?

                            Well thats about it for now, i love this new group, thanks!

                            Tanner McCuin
                            APvault

                            Lee, Chia Chin wrote:

                            > From: "Lee, Chia Chin" <CCLee@...>
                            >
                            > A good stereo microphone and a portable DAT deck can go a long way.
                            > Another good, cheap alternative is a portable MINIDISC player. The sound
                            > quality is good enough for capturing sound, and it's also quite small.
                            >
                            > Personally though, I enjoy manipulating and synthesizing sound more than
                            > capturing sound. Although I do record stuff, I get a lot done by processing
                            > the hell out of sound effects libraries on CDs and creating ambiences on
                            > analogue synths...
                            >
                            > > -----Original Message-----
                            > > From: dpaulsen [SMTP:dpaulsen@...]
                            > > Sent: Thursday, September 03, 1998 4:40 PM
                            > > To: gameaudiopro@onelist.com
                            > > Subject: [gameaudiopro] Re: Good Game Music?
                            > >
                            > > From: "dpaulsen" <dpaulsen@...>
                            > >
                            > > Here's a really silly question from a raw newbie...
                            > >
                            > > How *do* you capture live sounds? I mean besides the obvious tactic
                            > > of a $12.95 RadioShack cassette recorder held next to the vaccuum
                            > > cleaner or snarling pitbull or whatever... isn't there some magical
                            > > gear that makes a difference?
                            > >
                            > > I've seen "Movie Magic" specials on TLC where they show foley guys
                            > > strapped to 100-pound backpacks of sound gear, monster headphones,
                            > > boom mikes, and (I guess) hours of patience standing in a rice
                            > > paddy waiting for the ultimate insect sound. Or whatever.
                            > >
                            > > That's beyond my means, I'm afraid.
                            > >
                            > > What's a good, cheap, alternative?
                            > >
                            > > Thanks,
                            > > David
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            > > To unsubscribe from this mailing list, or to change your subscription
                            > > to digest, go to the ONElist web site, at http://www.onelist.com and
                            > > select the User Center link from the menu bar on the left.
                            >
                            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            > Help support ONElist, while generating interest in your product or
                            > service. ONElist has a variety of advertising packages. Visit
                            > http://www.onelist.com/advert.html for more information.
                          • Ryan Harris
                            hey, I am a newbie to, that was my first post :) i think someone else answered your question though. Minidisk is cool. Tascam makes a nice portable DAT (the
                            Message 13 of 13 , Sep 3, 1998
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                              hey, I am a newbie to, that was my first post :) i think someone else
                              answered your question though. Minidisk is cool. Tascam makes a nice
                              portable DAT (the DA-P1) with should strap and all (but it is like
                              $1400) as well. It depends on what you are sampling to. you are not
                              going to need a 48k sampling rate for recording a phone conversation or
                              banging on a wall or whatever.

                              All that gear is for people on multi-million dollar budgets... I suggest
                              the Shure SM81 as a mic. 20-20k flat frequency response. If that's too
                              much, go for an SM57. You'll need two for doing stereo though. There
                              are stereo mics available but I don't know too much about them.

                              For a cool stereo effect, put a piece of plywood in between one of the
                              mics and the sound source...

                              Ryan

                              >Here's a really silly question from a raw newbie...
                              >
                              >How *do* you capture live sounds? I mean besides the obvious tactic
                              >of a $12.95 RadioShack cassette recorder held next to the vaccuum
                              >cleaner or snarling pitbull or whatever... isn't there some magical
                              >gear that makes a difference?
                              >
                              >I've seen "Movie Magic" specials on TLC where they show foley guys
                              >strapped to 100-pound backpacks of sound gear, monster headphones,
                              >boom mikes, and (I guess) hours of patience standing in a rice
                              >paddy waiting for the ultimate insect sound. Or whatever.
                              >
                              >That's beyond my means, I'm afraid.
                              >
                              >What's a good, cheap, alternative?
                              >
                              >Thanks,
                              >David
                              >
                              >
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