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Air Cemac

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  • bobutne
    RABAT, Morocco (Reuters) -- Morocco s national flag carrier Royal Air Maroc (RAM) will soon launch an airline company with six Central African countries, a
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 18, 2005
      RABAT, Morocco (Reuters) -- Morocco's national flag carrier Royal Air
      Maroc (RAM) will soon launch an airline company with six Central
      African countries, a move set to expand further its presence in
      Africa, a company manager said on Thursday. The creation of Air Cemac
      aims at breaking the isolation of these countries and will offer an
      adequate solution to the crisis hitting central Africa's main,
      heavily indebted carriers, Camair of Cameroon and Air Gabon, the
      manager said.

      "The full details of this joint-venture will be revealed next week,"
      the manager told Reuters, declining to elaborate on the share-
      ownership of the new carrier. Shareholders in the new airline will
      include state-controlled RAM, Cameroon, Central African Republic,
      Congo Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Chad, he said.

      An accord between RAM and the six countries will be signed next week
      during a visit by King Mohammed to Gabon, he added.

      Air France, which holds minority stakes in Camair and Air Gabon, was
      a candidate to pilot the project but fears of conflicting commercial
      interests prompted the six countries to opt for RAM....

      It was not immediately known how Air Cemac would operate and what
      equipment it would use. Air Gabon and Camair have six aircraft each
      and both carry a million passengers each year. RAM has 32 mainly
      Boeing aircraft and operates 900 flights per week to 67 destinations
      in 40 countries. It carries up to 3.3 million passengers a year.
    • tom_leblanc_chico
      Dear Larry, So what do you think would be an effective use of US tax dollars? I didn t know that Peace Corps had a corruption and/or danger index to determine
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 8, 2005
        Dear Larry,

        So what do you think would be an effective use of US tax dollars? I
        didn't know that Peace Corps had a corruption and/or danger index to
        determine whether it should be in a country. As far as I know, all
        the countries where Peace Corps is present are corrupt and dangerous.

        Peace,

        Tom

        --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, SUPORTLINK@a... wrote:
        > Dear Bob:
        >
        > The Peace Corps in Gabon is not an effective use of USA tax
        dollars. The
        > government of Gabon is corrupt, and Peace Corps Volunteers are in
        too much
        > danger. The Peace Corps is NOT the end all to be all, or is the
        Peace Corps the
        > answer to every international issue of the USA.
        >
        > Yours Truly,
        > Larry R. Jackson, Support Links Services
        > 3700 Buchanan Ave., Space #68
        > Riverside, CA 92503
        > Phone: (951) 273-1776.....Fax: (951) 273-1755
        > Cell: (951) 850-8596
        > Web site: _www.SupLnk.com_ (http://www.suplnk.com/)
        >
        >
        > Email: Larry.Jackson@S...
        > "Failure Is Not An Option In This Lifetime!"
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • bobutne
        Gabon media bosses warned over double jobs; Libreville, Gabon 16 September 2005 Gabon s National Communication Council (CNC) has warned the bosses of 22
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 16, 2005
          Gabon media bosses warned over double jobs; Libreville, Gabon 16
          September 2005

          Gabon's National Communication Council (CNC) has warned the bosses of
          22 private newspapers and radio stations to stop doubling up jobs
          incompatible with their public duties, a CNC statement said. The CNC
          on Thursday quoted the code that regulates the media in the oil-rich
          Central African nation, whereby people with government, civil
          service, judicial or military office "cannot be owners or
          beneficiaries of audiovisual firms".

          CNC press officer Nestor Ella said the named chairpersons or
          publishing editors of six private radio stations and 16
          newspapers "are all in the civil service. That's not right." Those
          Ella identified include ministerial advisers and even an adviser to
          CNC president Pierre Marie Dong. The CNC order will not take
          immediate effect, but Ella said that "from December 31, those who
          haven't sorted out their situation will receive a final warning
          before their media outlets are shut down."

          Much of a lively private press in Gabon, though circulation is
          limited, is considered to be the mouthpiece of various officials in
          the regime, particularly government ministers, who use it to their
          own political ends. The CNC is appointed by President Omar Bongo and
          the speakers of the two Houses of Parliament. It has shut down a
          number of papers since 2003, and several private newspaper groups
          earlier this year accused it of actions leading to the muzzling of
          the press and democratic debate in Gabon, which has been ruled by
          Bongo since 1967. -- Sapa-AFP



          Air Gabon resumes flights to Paris

          LIBREVILLE, September 16 -- The management of Air Gabon, which has
          lacked wide-bodied passenger planes for several months, announced
          here Friday that the airline would resume flights to Paris on 26
          September. In a news released issued in Libreville, the management
          said that initially the airline will make a weekly flight using an
          Airbus A300-200 with a capacity of 364 seats (21 in business class
          and 343 in economic class). The government provided a grant to secure
          the aircraft. The ageing Air Gabon fleet had been reduced to a single
          Boeing 767-200 plane for long and middle distance flights.
          For lack of aircraft, the airline was obliged to completely halt all
          flights. Its Boeing 767-200 and 737-200 aircraft were grounded due to
          engine problems.

          In 2004, the airline reviewed its flight schedule along the African
          West coast and cancelled flights along unprofitable routes, including
          the Libreville-Dubai stretch that was very popular with West African
          business operators. According to the Prime Minister, Air Gabon has a
          heavy debt burden estimated at between 25 billion and 60 billion FCFA
          (about US$110 millions) and faces problems paying monthly wages to
          its employees. Air Gabon was created in 1977 with a capital ofe 6.5
          billion FCFA (US$10 million) after Libreville's withdrawal from the
          now defunct multinational airline, Air Afrique. - pana
        • bobutne
          Libreville, Gabon,09/26 - The Union of Air Gabon Workers (SYPAG) has sent a letter to President Omar Bongo Ondimba to ask him to choose the US firm,
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
            Libreville, Gabon,09/26 - The Union of Air Gabon Workers (SYPAG) has
            sent a letter to President Omar Bongo Ondimba to ask him to choose
            the US firm, International Trading Service Centre (ITSC), as
            a "strategic partner" in the privatisation of the troubled Air Gabon.

            According to SYPAG secretary-general, Pierre Boukila Boundzanga, the
            ITSC has proposed to lease for Air Gabon three aircraft (Boeing 777-
            200, 737-300 and 747-400) at the rate of 380 million CFA francs per
            month should the US firm get the right to run the airline. The
            company will also pay a two billion CFA franc deposit as a guarantee
            for the planes, he added.

            In an open letter copied to PANA, the SYPAG stressed that under the
            previous management, Air Atlanta Company had been renting to Air
            Gabon a Boeing 767-300 at a premium price of 220 million CFA francs
            for several months. In addition, the letter added, the ITSC is said
            to be interested in the opening of Air Gabon`s capital and ready to
            take 51 per cent shares of the company`s capital as planned in the
            Gabonese government`s "business plan."

            If ITSC`s proposal is accepted, the company may add a new Boeing to
            the company`s fleet, which would make it four the number of aircraft
            proposed by the US Company. Also, the ITSC would like to participate
            in the building of a new terminal in Libreville, the extension of
            Mvengue terminal in Franceville (south- east) as an alternative
            airport and set up an air logistics centre in Gabon, the SYPAG added.

            The Gabonese government, which remains the only shareholder of Air
            Gabon, whose the debt is estimated at 60 million CFA francs, after
            the withdrawal of Air France, has decided to find a strategic partner
            for the company`s survival.

            Talks are under way with Royal Air Maroc (RAM), in order to set up a
            company on the model of Air Senegal International, in which RAM has
            51 per cent of shares. But Gabonese NGOs and SYPAG denounced the
            talks with RAM.

            http://www.angolapress-angop.ao/noticia-e.asp?ID=377696
          • bobutne
            A decision by Africa s longest-serving leader to seek another seven years in power has been criticised. President Omar Bongo, who came to power in 1967, said
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 5, 2005
              A decision by Africa's longest-serving leader to seek another seven
              years in power has been criticised. President Omar Bongo, who came to
              power in 1967, said at the weekend that he had "listened to the
              people" and would seek another term in December's poll.

              The 69-year-old's government recently told opposition leaders they
              would lose their passports if they left Gabon. A group of exiles,
              called Bongo Must Leave, says Gabon's people have had enough of his
              authoritarian rule.

              "We are against the whole system, which Mr Bongo represents. We want
              to clean it all up," leader Serge Besac told the BBC's Network Africa
              by telephone from Washington.

              The 69-year-old president launched a crackdown after complaints by an
              opposition leader that the electoral register for December's
              presidential poll had been inflated.

              He was also said to be angered by a protest organised outside the
              United Nations last month, staged as he was addressing a summit.

              The government in Gabon has made changes to the constitution which
              would allow President Bongo to run for office as many times as he
              wishes.

              http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/4307838.stm
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