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Good job, Ali

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  • bobutne
    Ali Bongo has been instrumental in helping to curb the rapacious international logging industry within Gabon by requiring the logging companies to process most
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 8, 2010
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      Ali Bongo has been instrumental in helping to curb the rapacious international logging industry within Gabon by requiring the logging companies to process most of their logs at Gabon-based timber processing facilities. Previously, the companies just cut the timber and then shipped the logs out to China and elsewhere. Now the timber companies want Ali to relax the restrictions. See:

      http://www.ihb.de/wood/news/logs_softwood_plywood_24959.html

      In my opinion, there is no more destructive force affecting Gabon's wildlife (especially the primates) than the logging industry. They go in and cut roads into Gabon's vast virgin forests opening the way for the poachers (many from other countries) to come in and slaughter the primates and other wildlife for bush meat sales in Libreville and even exported to Europe and elsewhere.

      Of special note, by processing the logs in Gabon versus just shipping them overseas in raw form, there are excellent employment opportunities for the locals.
    • Gary Marsh
      Bob,It looks like Ali Bongo is becoming more of a conservationist thanhis father. I hope other African leaders take a cue from him.So many times African
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 8, 2010
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        Bob,It looks like Ali Bongo is becoming more of a conservationist thanhis father. I hope other African leaders take a cue from him.So many times African leaders have allowed exploiters to "rape and run" away with valuable raw materials at lowprices contributing little to the local economy. Newly developing countries have allowed this because theyinitially viewed this practice as "free money".The best example I can give is big game hunting licenses.When some international hotshot wants to bag an elephant,he can pay $1000 for a "license" hand written on a piece of scrap paper. It didn't cost the country anything, an official got $1000which he probably pocketed.

        To: gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com
        From: bobutne@...
        Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2010 15:54:21 +0000
        Subject: [Gabon Discussion] Good job, Ali




























        Ali Bongo has been instrumental in helping to curb the rapacious international logging industry within Gabon by requiring the logging companies to process most of their logs at Gabon-based timber processing facilities. Previously, the companies just cut the timber and then shipped the logs out to China and elsewhere. Now the timber companies want Ali to relax the restrictions. See:



        http://www.ihb.de/wood/news/logs_softwood_plywood_24959.html



        In my opinion, there is no more destructive force affecting Gabon's wildlife (especially the primates) than the logging industry. They go in and cut roads into Gabon's vast virgin forests opening the way for the poachers (many from other countries) to come in and slaughter the primates and other wildlife for bush meat sales in Libreville and even exported to Europe and elsewhere.



        Of special note, by processing the logs in Gabon versus just shipping them overseas in raw form, there are excellent employment opportunities for the locals.



















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • François Gouahinga
        Friends Bongo talk and talks but does little. On this specific policy, please remember that earlier this year his lieutenant Paul Biyoghe Mba came forward and
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 8, 2010
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          Friends

          Bongo talk and talks but does little. On this specific policy, please remember that earlier this year his lieutenant Paul Biyoghe Mba came forward and admitted that they had not carefully examined the question before making an announcement. As a result, they reversed course and declared a 2-year moratorium on their own policy. This will likely be extended upon expiration. You can read more here: http://gaboneco.com/show_article.php?IDActu=17079

          Don't fall for their big announcements: il apprend l'art de gouverner par les effets d'annonce.

          -Francois



          --- En date de : Mer 8.12.10, Gary Marsh <garymmarsh@...> a écrit :

          De: Gary Marsh <garymmarsh@...>
          Objet: RE: [Gabon Discussion] Good job, Ali
          À: "Gabondiscussion Gabondiscussion" <gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Mercredi 8 décembre 2010, 20h51


          Bob,It looks like Ali Bongo is becoming more of a conservationist thanhis father. I hope other African leaders take a cue from him.So many times African leaders have allowed exploiters to "rape and run" away with valuable raw materials at lowprices contributing little to the local economy.  Newly developing countries have allowed this because theyinitially viewed this practice as "free money".The best example I can give is big game hunting licenses.When some international hotshot wants to bag an elephant,he can pay $1000 for a "license" hand written on a piece of scrap paper.  It didn't cost the country anything, an official got $1000which he probably pocketed.

          To: gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com
          From: bobutne@...
          Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2010 15:54:21 +0000
          Subject: [Gabon Discussion] Good job, Ali






















           


             
               
               
                Ali Bongo has been instrumental in helping to curb the rapacious international logging industry within Gabon by requiring the logging companies to process most of their logs at Gabon-based timber processing facilities. Previously, the companies just cut the timber and then shipped the logs out to China and elsewhere. Now the timber companies want Ali to relax the restrictions. See:



          http://www.ihb.de/wood/news/logs_softwood_plywood_24959.html



          In my opinion, there is no more destructive force affecting Gabon's wildlife (especially the primates) than the logging industry. They go in and cut roads into Gabon's vast virgin forests opening the way for the poachers (many from other countries) to come in and slaughter the primates and other wildlife for bush meat sales in Libreville and even exported to Europe and elsewhere.



          Of special note, by processing the logs in Gabon versus just shipping them overseas in raw form, there are excellent employment opportunities for the locals.






             
               

             
             






                                      

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          Yahoo! Groups Links








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        • bobutne
          Thanks, François, for the clarification. Be interesting to see if Ali Bongo is more than hot air. In his defense, hard to process the timber locally without
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 8, 2010
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            Thanks, François, for the clarification. Be interesting to see if Ali Bongo is more than hot air.

            In his defense, hard to process the timber locally without the required human and physical infrastructure. Let's hope that the timber companies are required by the government to make the human and physical investments to keep this a sustainable Gabonese resource including the expansion of employment opportunities for the locals.



            --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, François Gouahinga <gouaf@...> wrote:
            >
            > Friends
            >
            > Bongo talk and talks but does little. On this specific policy, please remember that earlier this year his lieutenant Paul Biyoghe Mba came forward and admitted that they had not carefully examined the question before making an announcement. As a result, they reversed course and declared a 2-year moratorium on their own policy. This will likely be extended upon expiration. You can read more here: http://gaboneco.com/show_article.php?IDActu=17079
            >
            > Don't fall for their big announcements: il apprend l'art de gouverner par les effets d'annonce.
            >
            > -Francois
            >
            >
            >
            > --- En date de : Mer 8.12.10, Gary Marsh <garymmarsh@...> a écrit :
            >
            > De: Gary Marsh <garymmarsh@...>
            > Objet: RE: [Gabon Discussion] Good job, Ali
            > À: "Gabondiscussion Gabondiscussion" <gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com>
            > Date: Mercredi 8 décembre 2010, 20h51
            >
            >
            > Bob,It looks like Ali Bongo is becoming more of a conservationist thanhis father. I hope other African leaders take a cue from him.So many times African leaders have allowed exploiters to "rape and run" away with valuable raw materials at lowprices contributing little to the local economy.  Newly developing countries have allowed this because theyinitially viewed this practice as "free money".The best example I can give is big game hunting licenses.When some international hotshot wants to bag an elephant,he can pay $1000 for a "license" hand written on a piece of scrap paper.  It didn't cost the country anything, an official got $1000which he probably pocketed.
            >
            > To: gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com
            > From: bobutne@...
            > Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2010 15:54:21 +0000
            > Subject: [Gabon Discussion] Good job, Ali
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            >       Ali Bongo has been instrumental in helping to curb the rapacious international logging industry within Gabon by requiring the logging companies to process most of their logs at Gabon-based timber processing facilities. Previously, the companies just cut the timber and then shipped the logs out to China and elsewhere. Now the timber companies want Ali to relax the restrictions. See:
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            > In my opinion, there is no more destructive force affecting Gabon's wildlife (especially the primates) than the logging industry. They go in and cut roads into Gabon's vast virgin forests opening the way for the poachers (many from other countries) to come in and slaughter the primates and other wildlife for bush meat sales in Libreville and even exported to Europe and elsewhere.
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            > Of special note, by processing the logs in Gabon versus just shipping them overseas in raw form, there are excellent employment opportunities for the locals.
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          • bobutne
            FORDAQ, The Timber Network, The Gabon export ban continues and the authorities have made it clear that the ban includes logs, as well as boules and through
            Message 5 of 6 , May 2, 2011
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              FORDAQ, The Timber Network, "The Gabon export ban continues and the authorities have made it clear that the ban includes logs, as well as boules and through cut logs with trimmed heart and edges. Producers seem to have accepted the log export ban and have started to bring sawmills and other downstream facilities back into full production."

              http://timber.fordaq.com/fordaq/news/logs_softwood_plywood_26271.html
              -----------------------------------------------------------------------

              In Gabon, if companies want to cut down and export timber out of Gabon, they first must build sawmills and other downstream facilities and then use the sawmills to process the timber for export. Provides many more jobs for Gabonese and brings more income to Gabon.
            • Isaac Zama
              One of the rare instances that a central african president stands up for the interest of his people and country. Great job. ... From: bobutne
              Message 6 of 6 , May 2, 2011
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                One of the rare instances that a central african president stands up for the interest of his people and country.
                Great job.

                --- On Mon, 5/2/11, bobutne <bobutne@...> wrote:


                From: bobutne <bobutne@...>
                Subject: [Gabon Discussion] Good job, Ali
                To: gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, May 2, 2011, 8:38 PM


                FORDAQ, The Timber Network,  "The Gabon export ban continues and the authorities have made it clear that the ban includes logs, as well as boules and through cut logs with trimmed heart and edges. Producers seem to have accepted the log export ban and have started to bring sawmills and other downstream facilities back into full production."

                http://timber.fordaq.com/fordaq/news/logs_softwood_plywood_26271.html
                -----------------------------------------------------------------------

                In Gabon, if companies want to cut down and export timber out of Gabon, they first must build sawmills and other downstream facilities and then use the sawmills to process the timber for export. Provides many more jobs for Gabonese and brings more income to Gabon.



                ------------------------------------

                Yahoo! Groups Links





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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