Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Gabon Discussion] Gabon — Africa’s least African country?

Expand Messages
  • bobutne
    Yes, the Chinese are quickly controlling much of the world s remaining valuable natural resources while the rest of the world watches in apathy. Ali is riding
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 29, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Yes, the Chinese are quickly controlling much of the world's remaining valuable natural resources while the rest of the world watches in apathy. Ali is riding the China rickshaw, too.

      http://www.afriquejet.com/news/africa-news/gabonese-president-travels-to-china-2010042948525.html

      Libreville, Gabon - Gabonese President Ali Bongo Ondimba was billed to leave for China Wednesday to attend the opening of the 1 May-31 Oct. Universal Exhibition of Shanghai.

      During the visit, the Gabonese leader will also hold talks with his Chinese counterpart, Hu Jintao, on issues of bilateral cooperation, notably the exploitation of the iron deposit of Bélinga, and will meet Chinese industrialists.

      Both nations will also discuss timber exports from Gabon.

      President Bongo Ondimba will also use the opportunity of the visit to project the image of his country at the Exhibition, to be attended by more than 240 countries and international organizations and witnessed by 20 heads of state.

      According to official statistics, direct Chinese investments in Africa have gone from US$491 million in 2003 to US$7.8 billion at the end of 2008.


      --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, Gary Marsh <garymmarsh@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Bob,
      >
      > Your economic and political updates are always
      >
      > informative and interesting. Thanks for sending them.
      >
      > The Chinese enterprises always seem to have all the
      >
      > i's dotted and t's crossed. I don't ever recall hearing
      >
      > about any Chinese company (government activity)
      >
      > expelled from any country. They always seem to have
      >
      > an ace-up-the-sleeve and a way of schmoozing the
      >
      > local government with gifts or popular public projects
      >
      > as well as enormous economic clout.
      >
      >
      >
      > GM
      >
      >
      >
      > To: gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com
      > From: bobutne@...
      > Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2010 21:13:07 +0000
      > Subject: [Gabon Discussion] Gabon — Africa's least African country?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Reuters | April 28th, 2010 at 6:44 am
      >
      > Tucked between Cameroon and Congo Republic on Africa's Atlantic coast is Gabon, a country much unlike its neighbours. Many other African countries face problems that Gabon's President Ali Bongo has the luxury of not needing to worry about. Domestic insurgencies and armed rebel groups, the ruin caused by recent civil war, the presence of al Qaeda, refugees, rapid population growth, an economy dependent on aid rather than exports, an army inclined to overthrow its own president — Gabon is not bedevilled with such troubles.
      >
      > By contrast, Gabon is a picture of stability and relative wealth, densely forested and lightly populated, with an economy fuelled by rich energy deposits. But that's not to say the country is without difficulties. The oil reserves that provide most of the country's export income are dwindling, demanding the government does all it can to profit from its other natural resources such as minerals and
      > timber, a need Bongo recognises.
      >
      > And while Gabonese per capita gross domestic product of $13,900 is around four times that of its neighbours, most of the country's wealth is in the hands of a minority. The gap between rich and poor is huge — an issue not yet fully addressed by Bongo, who took over the presidency after his late father's four decades of rule in elections last year.
      >
      > For investors, the risks in Gabon are different to the risks in many other African countries. In Gabon, investors say the main problems are connected with a deadening bureaucracy, slow pace of work and poor infrastructure, rather than worrying about having their contracts torn up, being subject to long, unclear and often politically motivated reviews, or having to deal with sudden changes in government.
      >
      > The Belinga iron ore deposit is one exception in that the government has said it will review the 2006 contract it signed with a Chinese firm, but it seems unlikely Gabon will strip the Chinese of their rights.
      >
      > China's vice-minister of commerce, visiting Gabon last week, spoke about the contract with Bongo. And with the Chinese having promised to build Gabon a "Friendship Stadium" for football matches in the 2012 African Cup of Nations, co-hosting of which is a source of national pride, there will be little appetite for disturbing Sino-Gabonese ties.
      >
      > Bongo need not worry about domestic opposition. Having blown their chance to take him head on in the presidential election last year, the still disparate opposition parties continue to squabble about their own leadership.
      >
      > It is difficult to judge approval ratings, and many people are wary of criticising Bongo in public, but there is little sense that street-level discontent is rising, and the Gabonese population is largely unarmed and unradicalised.
      >
      > Gabon, far more insulated from political instability than any other country in the region, has in Bongo a president who claims to be a reformer, and who appears able to count on international support and patience as he attempts to modernise his country's system of government.
      >
      > It's no small challenge, effectively ending 40 years of patronage without denouncing his father's tenure, and shifting from that system to accountable, progressive government. But Bongo has a chance. Given his country's advantages, he will have no excuses if he fails.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > The New Busy is not the too busy. Combine all your e-mail accounts with Hotmail.
      > http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?tile=multiaccount&ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_4
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.