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Re: Michael Fay on MSNBC

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  • bobutne
    Fay took a lot of heat, after initially sending back daily messages posted on the Internet, for often calling his trek crew, boys . His crew must have thought
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 2, 2002
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      Fay took a lot of heat, after initially sending back daily messages
      posted on the Internet, for often calling his trek crew, "boys". His
      crew must have thought him crazy but for about $7 a day, and no other
      jobs to be had, they joined. He appeared a little "nuts" to me, too.
      According to Fay, he never wore a shirt, long pants or boots. Just
      shorts and floppy sandals. Maybe he thought that it's the pygmy/macho
      way and not how the rest of the world treks through deep, insect-
      infected bush. Yelling and waving arms at elephants is rather bizarre
      behavior, too. I know, from personal experience, better to just leave
      them at peace and if they charge, run like hell and hide.

      I take issue, also, about his condemnation of all logging and hunting
      within the virgin forests.

      Where once there were thousands of small villages throughout the
      forests, there remain few today. Practically everyone in Gabon,
      including most pygmies, has migrated to the towns or near the main
      roads leaving old villages to disappear back into the bush and fauna
      to replenish. Forests that were harvested for Okume and other
      valuable trees over 20 years ago, have fully regrown with the old
      logging trails spreading new forms of plants and trees. This is the
      case in Mikongo/La Lope that was harvested over 20 years ago and
      elsewhere in Gabon.

      Hunting has been a way of life for hundreds of miillions of years for
      the forest dwellers. There are still hundreds if not thousands of
      pygmies within the Gabon forests who hunt for survival and villagers
      of all tribes who hunt for their village's dietary needs. Where it
      makes sense to stop hunting are the poachers who sell for export to
      Libreville and other urban markets since these markets have an
      abundant supply of alternatives meats. Heavy fines could be imposed
      on anyone selling bush meat outside of their village and to
      restaurants in Libreville and elsewhere that feature bush meat.

      Looking forward to what others think about these issues.
    • jonathonwithano
      I don t think Gabonese villagers cause that much damage to the forest. Yes, they cut down a small section of forest each year to plant their plantations. Yes,
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 3, 2002
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        I don't think Gabonese villagers cause that much damage to the forest.

        Yes, they cut down a small section of forest each year to plant their
        plantations. Yes, they kill an occassional gazelle or pangolin to feed
        their families. But, I honestly believe that those actions of survival
        hardly have a real effect on the forest.

        On the other hand, I would suspect that one logging company probably
        cuts down more trees and disrupts the environments of more animals in
        one day than several villages of people do in one year.




        --- In gabondiscussion@y..., "bobutne" <bobutne@a...> wrote:
        > Fay took a lot of heat, after initially sending back daily messages
        > posted on the Internet, for often calling his trek crew, "boys". His
        > crew must have thought him crazy but for about $7 a day, and no other
        > jobs to be had, they joined. He appeared a little "nuts" to me, too.
        > According to Fay, he never wore a shirt, long pants or boots. Just
        > shorts and floppy sandals. Maybe he thought that it's the pygmy/macho
        > way and not how the rest of the world treks through deep, insect-
        > infected bush. Yelling and waving arms at elephants is rather bizarre
        > behavior, too. I know, from personal experience, better to just leave
        > them at peace and if they charge, run like hell and hide.
        >
        > I take issue, also, about his condemnation of all logging and hunting
        > within the virgin forests.
        >
        > Where once there were thousands of small villages throughout the
        > forests, there remain few today. Practically everyone in Gabon,
        > including most pygmies, has migrated to the towns or near the main
        > roads leaving old villages to disappear back into the bush and fauna
        > to replenish. Forests that were harvested for Okume and other
        > valuable trees over 20 years ago, have fully regrown with the old
        > logging trails spreading new forms of plants and trees. This is the
        > case in Mikongo/La Lope that was harvested over 20 years ago and
        > elsewhere in Gabon.
        >
        > Hunting has been a way of life for hundreds of miillions of years for
        > the forest dwellers. There are still hundreds if not thousands of
        > pygmies within the Gabon forests who hunt for survival and villagers
        > of all tribes who hunt for their village's dietary needs. Where it
        > makes sense to stop hunting are the poachers who sell for export to
        > Libreville and other urban markets since these markets have an
        > abundant supply of alternatives meats. Heavy fines could be imposed
        > on anyone selling bush meat outside of their village and to
        > restaurants in Libreville and elsewhere that feature bush meat.
        >
        > Looking forward to what others think about these issues.
      • bobutne
        Wilds of Africa s Gabon slated for vast park system Wed Sep 4, Tim Friend, USA TODAY One of the last wild places on Earth, brimming with chimpanzees, lowland
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 4, 2002
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          Wilds of Africa's Gabon slated for vast park system
          Wed Sep 4, Tim Friend, USA TODAY

          One of the last wild places on Earth, brimming with chimpanzees,
          lowland gorillas and forest elephants, will be preserved as a system
          of national parks by the government of Gabon in Central Africa,
          Gabonese officials announced Tuesday.

          More than 10,000 square miles, about 10% of Gabon, is being
          designated for 13 national parks. Conservationists say establishment
          of the parks -- the largest in Africa -- is one of the most
          significant ecological victories achieved anywhere because the
          tropical rain forests of Gabon are among the most pristine in the
          world. Rain forest covers about 75% of Gabon.

          ''Gabon is one of the last great wild expanses in the world, so this
          has tremendous value,'' said Steven Sanderson, president and CEO of
          the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society, which has worked
          with Gabonese officials for more than a decade to preserve important
          habitats. ''This is really one of the most ambitious and forward-
          looking political acts that we've seen in recent years.''

          Gabon President El Hadj Omar Bongo said: ''By creating these national
          parks, we will develop a viable alternative to simple exploitation of
          natural resources that will promote the preservation of our
          environment. Gabon has the potential to become a natural Mecca,
          attracting pilgrims from the four points of the compass in search of
          the last remaining natural wonders on Earth.''

          In 2000, Lee White of the conservation society persuaded logging
          companies to stay away from certain key habitats. White used
          scientific data obtained from surveys that revealed areas where
          wildlife was particularly abundant. The World Wildlife Fund and
          Conservation International also worked on the project. Logging
          companies are steadily encroaching into remote regions of Central
          Africa, and with the loggers come poachers who massacre wildlife to
          sell the meat.

          Gabon's rain forests drew global attention last year after WCS
          conservationist Michael Fay completed a 2,000-mile expedition, called
          Megatransect, through Central Africa.

          The pristine forests and wildlife were seen by millions in a
          documentary produced by the National Geographic ( news - web sites)
          Society, which co-sponsored Fay's expedition. The attention also
          influenced Bongo's decision to set aside such a large amount of land.

          ''This is a pretty dramatic illustration of the power of
          information,'' says Terry Garcia, vice president of the National
          Geographic Society. ''I like the saying 'Give people light, and they
          will find their own way.' The Megatransect really helped people to
          see what is happening in Central Africa, what is at stake, and what
          was about to be lost.''

          According to Fay, the clincher for Bongo was a photograph taken by
          the National Geographic's Nick Nichols depicting a hippopotamus
          frolicking in the surf on the country's western shore. Fay says Bongo
          exclaimed that he had been unaware Gabon possessed such a diversity
          of wildlife.

          Secretary of State Colin Powell ( news - web sites) is expected to
          announce a $36 million program today to assist Gabon and other
          nations in the Congo Basin with preserving rain forest and wildlife
          habitat.
        • bobutne
          Below is message #154 written in July 2002. In it, I dissed Fay for acting foolishly and dangerously around elephants. In January 2003, this is what happened
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 23, 2003
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            Below is message #154 written in July 2002. In it, I dissed Fay for
            acting foolishly and dangerously around elephants. In January 2003,
            this is what happened to this "bush fool":

            http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/01/0108_030108_fay.html


            --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "bobutne" <bobutne@a...>
            wrote:
            > Fay took a lot of heat, after initially sending back daily
            messages
            > posted on the Internet, for often calling his trek crew, "boys".
            His
            > crew must have thought him crazy but for about $7 a day, and no
            other
            > jobs to be had, they joined. He appeared a little "nuts" to me,
            too.
            > According to Fay, he never wore a shirt, long pants or boots. Just
            > shorts and floppy sandals. Maybe he thought that it's the
            pygmy/macho
            > way and not how the rest of the world treks through deep, insect-
            > infected bush. Yelling and waving arms at elephants is rather
            bizarre
            > behavior, too. I know, from personal experience, better to just
            leave
            > them at peace and if they charge, run like hell and hide.
            >
            > I take issue, also, about his condemnation of all logging and
            hunting
            > within the virgin forests.
            >
            > Where once there were thousands of small villages throughout the
            > forests, there remain few today. Practically everyone in Gabon,
            > including most pygmies, has migrated to the towns or near the main
            > roads leaving old villages to disappear back into the bush and
            fauna
            > to replenish. Forests that were harvested for Okume and other
            > valuable trees over 20 years ago, have fully regrown with the old
            > logging trails spreading new forms of plants and trees. This is
            the
            > case in Mikongo/La Lope that was harvested over 20 years ago and
            > elsewhere in Gabon.
            >
            > Hunting has been a way of life for hundreds of miillions of years
            for
            > the forest dwellers. There are still hundreds if not thousands of
            > pygmies within the Gabon forests who hunt for survival and
            villagers
            > of all tribes who hunt for their village's dietary needs. Where it
            > makes sense to stop hunting are the poachers who sell for export
            to
            > Libreville and other urban markets since these markets have an
            > abundant supply of alternatives meats. Heavy fines could be
            imposed
            > on anyone selling bush meat outside of their village and to
            > restaurants in Libreville and elsewhere that feature bush meat.
            >
            > Looking forward to what others think about these issues.
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