Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Dar Fox

Expand Messages
  • bobutne
    Dar Fox was in the first Peace Corps group sent to Gabon (1963-64) and subseqauently returned to Gabon from 1976-79 to help construct the TransGabonais
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 27, 2007
      Dar Fox was in the first Peace Corps group sent to Gabon (1963-64)
      and subseqauently returned to Gabon from 1976-79 to help construct
      the TransGabonais (Transgabon Railroad). From Dar's curriculum vitae:

      SENIOR FIELD RESIDENT ENGINEER,
      TRANSGABON RAILROAD,
      GABON, WEST EQUATORIAL AFRICA

      Directed multinational, French-speaking resident engineering office
      engaged in the construction management of a major section of the 600
      kilometre long Transgabon Railroad. Special consultant and advisor to
      the client (OCTRA) and to other resident engineering offices.

      Personnel supervised consisted of six engineers, land surveyors and
      geologists. Duties consisted of inspection and verification of
      surveying work, deforestation, and right-of-way preparation;
      continuous monitoring of earthworks and construction of drainage
      structures; design of subdrains; stability analysis and design of
      rock cuts; studies of geologic formations exposed by tunnelling and
      hard rock excavation activities; establishment of vegetation for
      erosion control of exposed slopes; preparation of as-built plan file;
      and review and approval of payment quantities submitted by
      contractor.

      Due to the length of the project, it was divided into a number of
      construction lots, with construction base camps located within each
      division for the large number of expatriate and local workers. The
      Engineer was responsible for approving all planning and inspected all
      construction and camp installations. Potable water supplies were from
      treated surface water sources and electricity was provided by
      generators. The camps were maintained to a high standard and the
      Engineer made periodic reports to assure that water supplies were
      safe and that waste water was properly treated to prevent pollution
      of the water ways.

      Because of the dense tropical rain forest and rugged landscape, the
      construction plans often lacked important engineering details. The
      highly-variable and difficult geological conditions and extreme
      tropical weathering also contributed to inaccurate construction
      plans. Exercised authority to make field plan revisions during
      execution of works. Hard-rock tunnel about 500 metres long used open-
      face blasting and encountered numerous problems with water intrusions
      and unstable rock reinforcement. Average monthly progress included
      150,000 cubic metres of earthwork, 5000 cubic metres of rock blasting
      and excavation, and 100 metric tonnes of corrugated metal culverts
      per construction division.
      -----------------------------------------------------------
      Dar is presently teaching civil engineering in Siegen, Germany.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.