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Africom

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  • bobutne
    American Pentagon s plans to create a military command based in Africa to expand US security interests have met with disapproval from governments in the
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 1, 2007
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      American Pentagon's plans to create a military command based in
      Africa to expand US security interests have met with disapproval from
      governments in the region, reluctant to associate themselves with
      its "war on terror".

      The controversial military command plan, dubbed Africom, said
      to "help" local forces fight piracy and other criminal activity in
      the west African region, is however, already underway in the Republic
      of Benin.

      Libya and Algeria told a US delegation led by Ryan Henry, principal
      deputy under-secretary of defence for policy visiting the region that
      they would play no part in hosting "Africom". Even Morocco, the US
      closest north African ally, expressed misgivings. The U.S. military
      say the idea is to shore up "fragile nations and prevent failed
      states" from breeding radical groups, just like the Taliban grew in
      Afghanistan in the 1990s.

      The so-called security and social partnership to be replicated across
      west Africa, is expected to officially commence in October and but
      overseen from Stuttgart, Germany, where the U.S. military's
      operations centre for Europe is situated. Theresa Whelan, U.S. deputy
      assistant secretary of defence for African affairs, says U.S.
      intervention under Africom would be in partnership with regional
      actors and in "extraordinary circumstances after all other options
      had been exhausted." However, analysts argue that the U.S. military
      is only stepping up its activities in oil-producing countries of west
      Africa - chiefly Angola, Nigeria, Gabon and the Republic of Congo -
      to secure constant flow of oil to the United States. At present, west
      Africa supplies about 15 percent of the U.S.'s oil imports, a share
      that could rise to 25 per cent if aggression in the region can be
      checked and investment in new oil finds continues uninterrupted.

      http://africatoday.eh7.co.uk/cgi-bin/public.cgi?
      sub=news&action=one&cat=65&id=1121
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