Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Gabon among World’s Top Ten Most Expensive Cities for Expatriates

Expand Messages
  • Bradley Alan Hodges
    What a tiring issue this has become, of how much expatriates must spend on luxury goods, restaurant meals, and grocery costs. C mon RPCVS, help me out here.
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
      What a tiring issue this has become, of how much expatriates must
      spend on "luxury goods, restaurant meals, and grocery costs." C'mon
      RPCVS, help me out here. It's rather sad to see U.S. Americans
      buying frozen pizzas and Pringles cans in a Central African version
      of Wal-Mart (Mbolo). Why the hell don't you go back to the U.S., if
      this was how you expected to live here?!? LBV isn't at all an
      expensive place to live, that is, if you would only learn how to
      shop, eat, and live like the locals. Arghhh...

      Moussavou

      --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "tom_leblanc_chico"
      <tom_leblanc_chico@...> wrote:
      >
      > A survey by Employee Conditions Abroad International, a membership
      > organization for international human resources, has ranked Harare,
      > Zimbabwe, as the world's most expensive city for expatriates, due
      > largely to the country's soaring inflation of 1,700%. Luanda,
      Angola
      > ranks number two. The survey takes into account more than 125
      > economic factors such as the cost of luxury goods, restaurant
      meals,
      > and grocery costs. The world's 10 most expensive cities for
      > expatriates according to the survey are:
      >
      > 1. Harare, Zimbabwe
      > 2. Luanda, Angola
      > 3. Oslo, Norway
      > 4. Moscow, Russia
      > 5. Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
      > 6. Stavanger, Norway
      > 7. Copenhagen, Denmark
      > 8. Seoul, South Korea
      > 9. Libreville, Gabon
      > 10. Tokyo, Japan
      >
    • Amin F. Abari
      I personally, very rarely saw any U.S. Americans (or other Americans) buying Pringles or anything else. Gabon is not like some other sub-Saharan African
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
        I personally, very rarely saw any "U.S. Americans" (or other
        Americans) buying Pringles or anything else. Gabon is not like some
        other sub-Saharan African countries and just a quick head count in
        any shop would tell you that. Most people buying the things you
        mention are Gabonese, French, Lebanese, ... - in that order. Most
        Americans in Libreville work for the Embassy and they order all their
        Pringles from NetGrocer and have it delivered vat and duty free.

        I once met a French man who had married a Gabonese. I had a
        conversation with him concerning cost of living in Gabon. He argued
        how Gabon was cheap while his wife was sulking on the couch! Later,
        she told me he would give her and her family very little money
        arguing the same thing. Why would they need money in such a cheap
        country?

        BTW, here is a quote from you from a year ago:

        "Let me start by saying that, even with all its corruption,
        mosquitoes, hot and muggy rainy seasons and ridiculous cost of
        living, I really miss Gabon a lot."

        Maybe prices have dropped significantly since last year for you to
        have changed your tune or maybe you meant ridiculously "LOW" cost of
        living!

        But while you are still on your high horse and telling the rest to
        get the "hell" out of Gabon, and if you really want to stay native,
        then stop giving milk* to your children (if you have children). Once
        the breast milk is finished most locals can't afford it on a regular
        basis. But then again life is cheap in Gabon.

        Amin

        *For the record there is no milk production in Gabon. All is
        imported from France. Most local women I spoke with would not be
        able to afford milk for their children after their breast milk was
        finished. If the children got any protein after was from locally
        caught fish. I can't think of any other country that does not have
        milk!


        --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "Bradley Alan Hodges"
        <niakurondi@...> wrote:
        >
        > What a tiring issue this has become, of how much expatriates must
        > spend on "luxury goods, restaurant meals, and grocery costs." C'mon
        > RPCVS, help me out here. It's rather sad to see U.S. Americans
        > buying frozen pizzas and Pringles cans in a Central African version
        > of Wal-Mart (Mbolo). Why the hell don't you go back to the U.S., if
        > this was how you expected to live here?!? LBV isn't at all an
        > expensive place to live, that is, if you would only learn how to
        > shop, eat, and live like the locals. Arghhh...
        >
        > Moussavou
        >
        > --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "tom_leblanc_chico"
        > <tom_leblanc_chico@> wrote:
        > >
        > > A survey by Employee Conditions Abroad International, a
        membership
        > > organization for international human resources, has ranked
        Harare,
        > > Zimbabwe, as the world's most expensive city for expatriates, due
        > > largely to the country's soaring inflation of 1,700%. Luanda,
        > Angola
        > > ranks number two. The survey takes into account more than 125
        > > economic factors such as the cost of luxury goods, restaurant
        > meals,
        > > and grocery costs. The world's 10 most expensive cities for
        > > expatriates according to the survey are:
        > >
        > > 1. Harare, Zimbabwe
        > > 2. Luanda, Angola
        > > 3. Oslo, Norway
        > > 4. Moscow, Russia
        > > 5. Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
        > > 6. Stavanger, Norway
        > > 7. Copenhagen, Denmark
        > > 8. Seoul, South Korea
        > > 9. Libreville, Gabon
        > > 10. Tokyo, Japan
        > >
        >
      • Bradley Alan Hodges
        Which proves my point entirely. If you re going to order your food over the Internet and have it shipped in from another part of the world, you shouldn t have
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
          Which proves my point entirely. If you're going to order your food
          over the Internet and have it shipped in from another part of the
          world, you shouldn't have the right to complain about how expensive
          it is when smoked fish and plantains are $1-$2 a pile.

          By the way, a large can of Nido costs $3.

          --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "Amin F. Abari"
          <aminabari@...> wrote:
          >
          > I personally, very rarely saw any "U.S. Americans" (or other
          > Americans) buying Pringles or anything else. Gabon is not like
          some
          > other sub-Saharan African countries and just a quick head count in
          > any shop would tell you that. Most people buying the things you
          > mention are Gabonese, French, Lebanese, ... - in that order. Most
          > Americans in Libreville work for the Embassy and they order all
          their
          > Pringles from NetGrocer and have it delivered vat and duty free.
          >
          > I once met a French man who had married a Gabonese. I had a
          > conversation with him concerning cost of living in Gabon. He
          argued
          > how Gabon was cheap while his wife was sulking on the couch!
          Later,
          > she told me he would give her and her family very little money
          > arguing the same thing. Why would they need money in such a cheap
          > country?
          >
          > BTW, here is a quote from you from a year ago:
          >
          > "Let me start by saying that, even with all its corruption,
          > mosquitoes, hot and muggy rainy seasons and ridiculous cost of
          > living, I really miss Gabon a lot."
          >
          > Maybe prices have dropped significantly since last year for you to
          > have changed your tune or maybe you meant ridiculously "LOW" cost
          of
          > living!
          >
          > But while you are still on your high horse and telling the rest to
          > get the "hell" out of Gabon, and if you really want to stay
          native,
          > then stop giving milk* to your children (if you have children).
          Once
          > the breast milk is finished most locals can't afford it on a
          regular
          > basis. But then again life is cheap in Gabon.
          >
          > Amin
          >
          > *For the record there is no milk production in Gabon. All is
          > imported from France. Most local women I spoke with would not be
          > able to afford milk for their children after their breast milk was
          > finished. If the children got any protein after was from locally
          > caught fish. I can't think of any other country that does not
          have
          > milk!
          >
          >
          > --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "Bradley Alan Hodges"
          > <niakurondi@> wrote:
          > >
          > > What a tiring issue this has become, of how much expatriates
          must
          > > spend on "luxury goods, restaurant meals, and grocery costs."
          C'mon
          > > RPCVS, help me out here. It's rather sad to see U.S. Americans
          > > buying frozen pizzas and Pringles cans in a Central African
          version
          > > of Wal-Mart (Mbolo). Why the hell don't you go back to the U.S.,
          if
          > > this was how you expected to live here?!? LBV isn't at all an
          > > expensive place to live, that is, if you would only learn how to
          > > shop, eat, and live like the locals. Arghhh...
          > >
          > > Moussavou
          > >
          > > --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "tom_leblanc_chico"
          > > <tom_leblanc_chico@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > A survey by Employee Conditions Abroad International, a
          > membership
          > > > organization for international human resources, has ranked
          > Harare,
          > > > Zimbabwe, as the world's most expensive city for expatriates,
          due
          > > > largely to the country's soaring inflation of 1,700%. Luanda,
          > > Angola
          > > > ranks number two. The survey takes into account more than 125
          > > > economic factors such as the cost of luxury goods, restaurant
          > > meals,
          > > > and grocery costs. The world's 10 most expensive cities for
          > > > expatriates according to the survey are:
          > > >
          > > > 1. Harare, Zimbabwe
          > > > 2. Luanda, Angola
          > > > 3. Oslo, Norway
          > > > 4. Moscow, Russia
          > > > 5. Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
          > > > 6. Stavanger, Norway
          > > > 7. Copenhagen, Denmark
          > > > 8. Seoul, South Korea
          > > > 9. Libreville, Gabon
          > > > 10. Tokyo, Japan
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • bobutne
          How many US expatriates reside in Gabon? My guess, besides the US embassy staff, only a few missionaries and a few others working in the petroleum industry; in
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
            How many US expatriates reside in Gabon? My guess, besides the US
            embassy staff, only a few missionaries and a few others working in the
            petroleum industry; in total, about 30.
          • Tom LeBlanc
            I must admit that at first I was taken aback but then pleasantly surprised by the strong responses in both directions (both pro and con) to this simple
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
              I must admit that at first I was taken aback but then
              pleasantly surprised by the strong responses in both
              directions (both pro and con) to this simple
              statistic. This data points out the stark contrast
              between how expensive it is for the poorest of the
              poor (who have no money) to live in Libreville and the
              reality that for most middle class people (both
              foreigners and locals who seek to lead a middle class
              lifestyle), Libreville is one of THE most expensive
              cities on the planet. I mean, it's more expensive for
              a middle class expat to live in Libreville than it is
              for a middle class expat to live in Tokyo! This is an
              outrage when you think that more than 60% of all
              Gabonese still live at or below the poverty line (in
              fact, 30% of the Gabonese living in Libreville live
              below what is called the "absolute poverty line"--that
              means they have no money whatsoever so those dried
              fish for a buck might as well cost a million bucks)
              whereas the vast majority of Japanese are middle
              class. Not only that, there are only about half a
              million people living in Libreville and 12 million
              living in Tokyo. One more statistic of interest: the
              average life expectancy in Libreville is 56; in Tokyo
              it's 81.

              I remember not too long ago (maybe a few years ago) I
              saw another statistic that ranked Gabon as the highest
              consumer of champagne per capita in the world. Do you
              think it's middle class expats who are sitting around
              sipping tons of French champagne? There is a severe
              gap between the very richest Gabonese and the rest of
              the population. When I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in
              Gabon in the early 1980s, the contrast was no
              different. In more that 20 years, it seems nothing has
              changed. If anything, the fact that it's more
              expensive to live in Libreville than Tokyo suggests it
              may be getting worse.

              --- bobutne <bobutne@...> wrote:

              > How many US expatriates reside in Gabon? My guess,
              > besides the US
              > embassy staff, only a few missionaries and a few
              > others working in the
              > petroleum industry; in total, about 30.
              >
              >




              ____________________________________________________________________________________
              Yahoo! Music Unlimited
              Access over 1 million songs.
              http://music.yahoo.com/unlimited
            • Amin F. Abari
              I like your logic!! All it proves is that Gabon is so expensive that it is more cost efficient for the people to have food shipped all the way from the US and
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 15, 2006
                I like your logic!!

                All it proves is that Gabon is so expensive that it is more cost
                efficient for the people to have food shipped all the way from the US
                and still save money! And these are the few lucky American diplomats
                that have access and are allowed to do this. You can imagine how
                expensive it is for the rest.

                BTW, you didn't explain why you thought Gabon was expensive last year
                and now you think it is cheap? What could have changed?

                "What's for dinner honey?" "The usual. Plantains and smoked fish.
                What else would there be?" "Wow. Aren't we lucky to live in a cheap
                country where we can eat that every night? I wonder why the rest of
                the world doesn't move here. It is so cheap!"

                Also, based on your logic and the fact that $1-$2 for a pile of
                plantain is also more expensive than any other country in the world;
                why don't you move to the bush, stop paying the 1000CFA an hour for
                your internet cafe luxury and live off the land? Life would be free
                and then you can truly claim Gabon is the cheapest country in the
                World.

                I'd say anyone lazy enough to pay a dollar to buy plantains and is
                not willing to walk into the wild and find it for themselves should
                get the hell out of Gabon. And should automatically loose all rights
                to complain, whine, and pass judgment on others. :-)

                Amin




                --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "Bradley Alan Hodges"
                <niakurondi@...> wrote:
                >
                > Which proves my point entirely. If you're going to order your food
                > over the Internet and have it shipped in from another part of the
                > world, you shouldn't have the right to complain about how expensive
                > it is when smoked fish and plantains are $1-$2 a pile.
                >
                > By the way, a large can of Nido costs $3.
                >
                > --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "Amin F. Abari"
                > <aminabari@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I personally, very rarely saw any "U.S. Americans" (or other
                > > Americans) buying Pringles or anything else. Gabon is not like
                > some
                > > other sub-Saharan African countries and just a quick head count
                in
                > > any shop would tell you that. Most people buying the things you
                > > mention are Gabonese, French, Lebanese, ... - in that order.
                Most
                > > Americans in Libreville work for the Embassy and they order all
                > their
                > > Pringles from NetGrocer and have it delivered vat and duty free.
                > >
                > > I once met a French man who had married a Gabonese. I had a
                > > conversation with him concerning cost of living in Gabon. He
                > argued
                > > how Gabon was cheap while his wife was sulking on the couch!
                > Later,
                > > she told me he would give her and her family very little money
                > > arguing the same thing. Why would they need money in such a
                cheap
                > > country?
                > >
                > > BTW, here is a quote from you from a year ago:
                > >
                > > "Let me start by saying that, even with all its corruption,
                > > mosquitoes, hot and muggy rainy seasons and ridiculous cost of
                > > living, I really miss Gabon a lot."
                > >
                > > Maybe prices have dropped significantly since last year for you
                to
                > > have changed your tune or maybe you meant ridiculously "LOW" cost
                > of
                > > living!
                > >
                > > But while you are still on your high horse and telling the rest
                to
                > > get the "hell" out of Gabon, and if you really want to stay
                > native,
                > > then stop giving milk* to your children (if you have children).
                > Once
                > > the breast milk is finished most locals can't afford it on a
                > regular
                > > basis. But then again life is cheap in Gabon.
                > >
                > > Amin
                > >
                > > *For the record there is no milk production in Gabon. All is
                > > imported from France. Most local women I spoke with would not be
                > > able to afford milk for their children after their breast milk
                was
                > > finished. If the children got any protein after was from locally
                > > caught fish. I can't think of any other country that does not
                > have
                > > milk!
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "Bradley Alan Hodges"
                > > <niakurondi@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > What a tiring issue this has become, of how much expatriates
                > must
                > > > spend on "luxury goods, restaurant meals, and grocery costs."
                > C'mon
                > > > RPCVS, help me out here. It's rather sad to see U.S. Americans
                > > > buying frozen pizzas and Pringles cans in a Central African
                > version
                > > > of Wal-Mart (Mbolo). Why the hell don't you go back to the
                U.S.,
                > if
                > > > this was how you expected to live here?!? LBV isn't at all an
                > > > expensive place to live, that is, if you would only learn how
                to
                > > > shop, eat, and live like the locals. Arghhh...
                > > >
                > > > Moussavou
                > > >
                > > > --- In gabondiscussion@yahoogroups.com, "tom_leblanc_chico"
                > > > <tom_leblanc_chico@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > A survey by Employee Conditions Abroad International, a
                > > membership
                > > > > organization for international human resources, has ranked
                > > Harare,
                > > > > Zimbabwe, as the world's most expensive city for expatriates,
                > due
                > > > > largely to the country's soaring inflation of 1,700%.
                Luanda,
                > > > Angola
                > > > > ranks number two. The survey takes into account more than
                125
                > > > > economic factors such as the cost of luxury goods, restaurant
                > > > meals,
                > > > > and grocery costs. The world's 10 most expensive cities for
                > > > > expatriates according to the survey are:
                > > > >
                > > > > 1. Harare, Zimbabwe
                > > > > 2. Luanda, Angola
                > > > > 3. Oslo, Norway
                > > > > 4. Moscow, Russia
                > > > > 5. Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
                > > > > 6. Stavanger, Norway
                > > > > 7. Copenhagen, Denmark
                > > > > 8. Seoul, South Korea
                > > > > 9. Libreville, Gabon
                > > > > 10. Tokyo, Japan
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.