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Re: [future-fuels-and-vehicles] Re: Stirling engines see them work

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  • James Wilson
    The heat engine,or Striling Cycle Engine,operates of an internal pressure & then quickly changes to a vaccuum,as the air inside is cooled by the cold end.
    Message 1 of 13 , May 1, 2006
      The heat engine,or Striling Cycle Engine,operates of
      an internal pressure & then quickly changes to a
      vaccuum,as the air inside is cooled by the cold end.
      There is no air leaving or intering the engine.Hope
      this link will help. James Wilson

      http://www.keveney.com/Engines.html

      --- jonnyy40 <jonnyy100@...> wrote:

      > Are there any REALLY simple books that can help the
      > untrained person
      > get started in heat engines?ie like a previous
      > poster I don't really
      > understand WHY the hot side needs to be compressed
      > by a piston.If the
      > carnot cycle seeks the greatest differential in
      > temperature between the
      > hot and cold side,what on earth is the purpose of
      > the regenerator?Why
      > is it necessary for the cold side to be compressed
      > also (and any
      > ensuing heat to be removed by the cold heat
      > exchanger)?I'm sorry to
      > pose such basic questions but I've got a feeling
      > that was what an
      > earlier poster was asking for but was too
      > embarrassed to ask (in my
      > case it's friday so what the heck)I have looked up
      > the laws of
      > thermodynamics so I'm not completely lazy but
      > applying them to a
      > concept is not so easy for me.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


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    • murdoch
      ... Actually, Stirling technology is being applied and used, to get greater efficiencies, in what appear to be (by far) the largest solar-to-electricity
      Message 2 of 13 , May 2, 2006
        >A solar reflector, for example, can run a Stirling engine to spin a
        >generator to make electricity. A solar reflector big enough to boil
        >water or oil to run a turbine to run the generator would generate
        >higher temperatures and presumably incur higher radiation losses.
        >
        >Stirling engines are old enough that expectations for them to
        >revolutionize mechanical engineering are beginning to fade. However,
        >we will keep them in mind as a potential tool to apply when the right
        >problem appears.

        Actually, Stirling technology is being applied and used, to get
        greater efficiencies, in what appear to be (by far) the largest
        solar-to-electricity projects in history (if they come off):

        Stirling Energy Systems and Edison International:
        500-850 MW:
        Mojave Desert


        Stirling Energy Systems and San Diego Gas And Electric
        300-900 MW:
        Imperial Valley, CA:

        http://www.stirlingenergy.com/breaking_news.htm

        The test plants appear to have been built and appear to be
        functioning:

        >The “highlight” of the tour was the start up and operation of the six-dish system mini power plant of Stirling Energy Systems (SES). The President and Dr. Hunter were standing in the middle of the dishes as they tracked on sun and started producing electricity. Dr. Hunter described the operation of the systems emphasized the unique laboratory-industry relationship between DOE/SNL and SES that is making this happen. (During the start up of the dish field, Dr. Hunter recognized Chuck Andraka, Sandia's Chief Engineer on the SES Project, who was standing with the press core. The President invited Chuck to join them and shook his hand.)

        I have researched this, and I believe the actual stirling tech itself
        comes under license or origin from a European outfit which, in turn, I
        think developed the technology for use on board a submarine, but it
        was hard to trace.
      • murdoch
        Ah, I see, you were making a distinction between mechanical and electrical output. In the case I cited it is electrical output, ultimately, so it is not
        Message 3 of 13 , May 2, 2006
          Ah, I see, you were making a distinction between mechanical and
          electrical output. In the case I cited it is electrical output,
          ultimately, so it is not exactly to the point you were making.


          On Fri, 21 Apr 2006 19:24:09 -0700, you wrote:

          >At 8:12 PM -0500 4/21/06, Mark Garvey wrote:
          >>Sorry to sound so dense. But when I look up Stirling engines, I find
          >>basically ...nothing useful.
          >
          >The one role they might have in our system designs is to capture the
          >energy of heat flowing from hot to cold, when there is not enough
          >heat differential to boil the working fluid. Steam engines require
          >boiling; Stirling engines do not.
          >
          >While there are a few practical applications using Stirling engines
          >to generate electricity, I know of no Stirling engine used
          >practically (toys excepted) for its mechanical output.
          >
          >A solar reflector, for example, can run a Stirling engine to spin a
          >generator to make electricity. A solar reflector big enough to boil
          >water or oil to run a turbine to run the generator would generate
          >higher temperatures and presumably incur higher radiation losses.
          >
          >Stirling engines are old enough that expectations for them to
          >revolutionize mechanical engineering are beginning to fade. However,
          >we will keep them in mind as a potential tool to apply when the right
          >problem appears.
          >
          >--Gil
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • esbuck@aol.com
          Yes, you can buy working models. Back in the 70s, NASA spent $millions trying to get a Stirling-powered automobile to work. Their Stirling-powered Volvo
          Message 4 of 13 , May 2, 2006
            Yes, you can buy working models. Back in the '70s, NASA spent $millions
            trying to get a Stirling-powered automobile to work. Their Stirling-powered
            Volvo looked nice, but I nev er saw it run. Yes, in theory a Stirling engine
            is thermodynamically efficient, but it appears difficult to produce and
            maintain them economically.

            If anyone is interested, I have an expired patent on a very simple hot air
            engine which could use solar heat. The trick is "junk yard" engineering. A
            motor with only a few moving parts and sunlight, which is cheap, can make up
            for a lot. Generating electricity is fairly demanding, when simple
            mechanical power is fine for many uses, like pumping water.


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