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Law Enforcement And The Costs Of Fuel

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  • murdoch_1998
    I spoke to a person the other day who commented that he thought that fuel constituted a very significant portion (even of a majority) of a law enforcement
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 8, 2004
      I spoke to a person the other day who commented that he thought that
      fuel constituted a very significant portion (even of a majority) of
      a law enforcement department's (non-salary?) expenses. I wonder
      what some law enforcement agencies might be doing to aggressively
      pursue alt-fuel options, as the price for conventional fuel rises.
    • James Wilson
      Find a good hiding spot,lay in wait,(not entrapment)and write more tickets? JW ... _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Declare Yourself - Register
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 8, 2004
        Find a good hiding spot,lay in wait,(not
        entrapment)and write more tickets? JW

        --- murdoch_1998 <murdoch@...> wrote:

        >
        > I spoke to a person the other day who commented that
        > he thought that
        > fuel constituted a very significant portion (even of
        > a majority) of
        > a law enforcement department's (non-salary?)
        > expenses. I wonder
        > what some law enforcement agencies might be doing to
        > aggressively
        > pursue alt-fuel options, as the price for
        > conventional fuel rises.
        >
        >
        >
        >




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      • Steve Erlsten
        I talked to a former police chief in Titusville, FL about gasoline a few months ago. He comment on how it was impossible to set a budget when the price of
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 9, 2004
          I talked to a former police chief in Titusville, FL about gasoline a few months ago. He comment on how it was impossible to set a budget when the price of gasoline might fluctuate by 50% between the time the budget is written and the time the budget period ends (potentially an 18-month period). I talked to him about hybrid cop cars, and he seemed to agree that they could be perfectly suited. A vehicle that idles for hours on end could save a huge percentage of its fuel if it could turn off the ICE and run the electronics on battery power. In fact, cop cars already have a second battery (like commercial diesel work trucks do sometimes). He said he was constantly trying to get the cops to turn the engines off more and idle less because the electronics can run on battery power alone--it's just the A/C that needs the engine. An oversized hybrid passenger car (a crown vic or chevy impala) could save a lot of fuel and emissions in taxi and police fleets. It seems like it would be pretty easy to save money overall, too. I haven't been able to find any good fuel economy estimates for those fleets, though.

          To bring that back to alt-fuels, Alacua County (in Florida) used that as another selling point when it switched its diesels to B20. They had a contract with the supplier that kept the price steady for 12 months. The biodiesel made it a little easier to write a budget by removing some of the price fluctuations. Hopefully they are still on B20.



          -----Original Message-----
          From: murdoch_1998 <murdoch@...>
          Sent: Oct 8, 2004 9:00 PM
          To: evworld@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [evworld] Law Enforcement And The Costs Of Fuel



          I spoke to a person the other day who commented that he thought that
          fuel constituted a very significant portion (even of a majority) of
          a law enforcement department's (non-salary?) expenses. I wonder
          what some law enforcement agencies might be doing to aggressively
          pursue alt-fuel options, as the price for conventional fuel rises.







          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • murdoch_1998
          Yes, this is along the lines of what I was wondering. Even if we take James s idea that they can modify some of their behaviours to lessen their fuel use
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 9, 2004
            Yes, this is along the lines of what I was wondering. Even if we
            take James's idea that they can modify some of their behaviours to
            lessen their fuel use (such as by lying in wait instead of cruising
            the highway), the bottom line is they still need to be able to
            patrol, to do their jobs, to project a presence, etc.

            In my brief visit to Florida a few years ago, I was told in no
            uncertain terms to turn on the A/C the instant we ever enterred a
            vehicle. This wouldn't be my choice, but some I think treat it as a
            right and obligation, and not as an option to be sacrificed in the
            face of high energy costs. In my own case, living in a dry but hot
            area, I did just spend money on window tinting, which I hope will
            somewhat decrease the costs of A/C, though I often will just choose
            to roll down a window instead of turning on the A/C. The window
            tinting thing won't make a huge difference, but I just thought I'd
            mention it. Every tiny little energy saving feature can be of
            interest to some of us. I also increased mileage recently by
            replacing tires, because the new tires had a higher recommended
            inflation rate. I haven't noticed a difference in ride-feel.

            In some cases, some Law Enforcement needs lead to officers on
            horseback, such as when you have very rugged terrain and the need to
            patrol a border.

            Getting back to the example you give, it's a good reminder that some
            hybrids can save us the energy of idling at a stoplight or other
            area. Those who order vehicles may be hamstrung by having to order
            only American. I haven't verified that Ford has made its hybrid
            available yet, but assuming they have, maybe this would be the only
            hybrid option on the menu. Not grid-chargeable, and probably not
            diesel, so far as I know, but a larger hybrid that I guess could be
            modified for some police use?

            I bet that somewhere out there, there are additional law enforcement
            agencies which have sought to address these issues in innovative
            ways (such as the B20 program you mention), though they may have run
            into some of the same problems that we have run into... including
            the no-can-do philosophy of the auto companies, when it comes to
            alternatives to fossil-derived fuels... even when those companies
            are dealing with very good customers.


            --- In evworld@yahoogroups.com, Steve Erlsten <sje333@e...> wrote:
            > I talked to a former police chief in Titusville, FL about gasoline
            a few months ago. He comment on how it was impossible to set a
            budget when the price of gasoline might fluctuate by 50% between the
            time the budget is written and the time the budget period ends
            (potentially an 18-month period). I talked to him about hybrid cop
            cars, and he seemed to agree that they could be perfectly suited. A
            vehicle that idles for hours on end could save a huge percentage of
            its fuel if it could turn off the ICE and run the electronics on
            battery power. In fact, cop cars already have a second battery
            (like commercial diesel work trucks do sometimes). He said he was
            constantly trying to get the cops to turn the engines off more and
            idle less because the electronics can run on battery power alone--
            it's just the A/C that needs the engine. An oversized hybrid
            passenger car (a crown vic or chevy impala) could save a lot of fuel
            and emissions in taxi and police fleets. It seems like it would be
            pretty easy to save money overall, too. I haven't been able to find
            any good fuel economy estimates for those fleets, though.
            >
            > To bring that back to alt-fuels, Alacua County (in Florida) used
            that as another selling point when it switched its diesels to B20.
            They had a contract with the supplier that kept the price steady for
            12 months. The biodiesel made it a little easier to write a budget
            by removing some of the price fluctuations. Hopefully they are
            still on B20.
            >
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: murdoch_1998 <murdoch@h...>
            > Sent: Oct 8, 2004 9:00 PM
            > To: evworld@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [evworld] Law Enforcement And The Costs Of Fuel
            >
            >
            >
            > I spoke to a person the other day who commented that he thought
            that
            > fuel constituted a very significant portion (even of a majority)
            of
            > a law enforcement department's (non-salary?) expenses. I wonder
            > what some law enforcement agencies might be doing to aggressively
            > pursue alt-fuel options, as the price for conventional fuel rises.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
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