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Could BMW's Mini E go the way of the EV1 and RAV 4 EV?

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  • Matt Kelly
    I just wrote an article on this topic-- The similarities are starting to look eerily similar. Consider this: BMW’s one-year pilot program consists of just
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 2009
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      I just wrote an article on this topic--

      The similarities are starting to look eerily similar. Consider this:

      BMW’s one-year pilot program consists of just 500 converted electric Mini Coopers leased for an exorbitant $850 per month.

      Sound familiar?

      GM never offered the EV1 for public sale. It was only available to consumers under a lease program that had a "no purchase" clause, disallowing the vehicle's re-purchase at the conclusion of the lease.

      But it get's even freakier.

      If you'd like to read the whole article, the link is here: http://shar.es/5jkp

      Thanks,

      -mk
    • murdoch
      Also, in addition to what you ve said, I discussed with one person that apparently some important tax credits are not applying to the BMW vehicles (I don t
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Also, in addition to what you've said, I discussed with one person
        that apparently some important tax credits are not applying to the BMW
        vehicles (I don't recall for certain why not, but perhaps because they
        are not for sale) and so, given their extremely high price, BMW was
        having some difficulty leasing all of them.... hence the low lease
        prices you mentioned in your article ($10 per month).... At least,
        that's the chain of logic I heard.

        It is wrong in several ways that while the world clamors for oil-free
        solutions, BMW plays this game. However, it is a dangerous game, in
        my view. My hypothesis is that the Chinese vehicle manufacturers did
        not get whatever memo was sent out telling to play these idiotic
        games, and at some point within the next year or two or three, they
        are going to actually be offering highway-or-at-least-city-capable
        4-wheel plug-in vehicles to American consumers, without the hassle,
        without the outrageous prices, and without the games.

        In other words, there may be actual competition in response to actual
        consumer demand, and then we'll see how BMW does. Maybe they will go
        the way of GM.



        [Default] On Wed, 01 Jul 2009 17:44:19 -0000, "Matt Kelly"
        <majicmattyla@...> wrote:

        >I just wrote an article on this topic--
        >
        >The similarities are starting to look eerily similar. Consider this:
        >
        >BMW’s one-year pilot program consists of just 500 converted electric Mini Coopers leased for an exorbitant $850 per month.
        >
        >Sound familiar?
        >
        >GM never offered the EV1 for public sale. It was only available to consumers under a lease program that had a "no purchase" clause, disallowing the vehicle's re-purchase at the conclusion of the lease.
        >
        >But it get's even freakier.
        >
        >If you'd like to read the whole article, the link is here: http://shar.es/5jkp
        >
        >Thanks,
        >
        >-mk
        >
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Lee Dekker
        Sometimes it seems like the only way impossible things such as electric vehicles are able to move forward is when someone doesn t get the message and
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 2, 2009
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          Sometimes it seems like the only way "impossible" things such as electric vehicles are able to move forward is when "someone doesn't get the message" and builds them anyway.



          --- On Wed, 7/1/09, murdoch <murdoch@...> wrote:

          From: murdoch <murdoch@...>
          Subject: Re: [future-fuels-and-vehicles] Could BMW's Mini E go the way of the EV1 and RAV 4 EV?
          To: future-fuels-and-vehicles@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 5:00 PM


























          Also, in addition to what you've said, I discussed with one person

          that apparently some important tax credits are not applying to the BMW

          vehicles (I don't recall for certain why not, but perhaps because they

          are not for sale) and so, given their extremely high price, BMW was

          having some difficulty leasing all of them.... hence the low lease

          prices you mentioned in your article ($10 per month).... At least,

          that's the chain of logic I heard.



          It is wrong in several ways that while the world clamors for oil-free

          solutions, BMW plays this game. However, it is a dangerous game, in

          my view. My hypothesis is that the Chinese vehicle manufacturers did

          not get whatever memo was sent out telling to play these idiotic

          games, and at some point within the next year or two or three, they

          are going to actually be offering highway-or-at- least-city- capable

          4-wheel plug-in vehicles to American consumers, without the hassle,

          without the outrageous prices, and without the games.



          In other words, there may be actual competition in response to actual

          consumer demand, and then we'll see how BMW does. Maybe they will go

          the way of GM.



          [Default] On Wed, 01 Jul 2009 17:44:19 -0000, "Matt Kelly"

          <majicmattyla@ gmail.com> wrote:



          >I just wrote an article on this topic--

          >

          >The similarities are starting to look eerily similar. Consider this:

          >

          >BMW’s one-year pilot program consists of just 500 converted electric Mini Coopers leased for an exorbitant $850 per month.

          >

          >Sound familiar?

          >

          >GM never offered the EV1 for public sale. It was only available to consumers under a lease program that had a "no purchase" clause, disallowing the vehicle's re-purchase at the conclusion of the lease.

          >

          >But it get's even freakier.

          >

          >If you'd like to read the whole article, the link is here: http://shar. es/5jkp

          >

          >Thanks,

          >

          >-mk

          >

          >

          >

          >----------- --------- --------- -------

          >

          >Yahoo! Groups Links

          >

          >

          >


































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