Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [future-fuels-and-vehicles] safety tradeoffs of smaller cars

Expand Messages
  • Ron Cochran
    This sounds like yet another good reason to get rid of the large cars! Ron _____ From: future-fuels-and-vehicles@yahoogroups.com
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 19, 2009
      This sounds like yet another good reason to get rid of the large cars!

      Ron


      _____

      From: future-fuels-and-vehicles@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:future-fuels-and-vehicles@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of murdoch
      Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2009 5:01 PM
      To: murdoch@...
      Subject: [future-fuels-and-vehicles] safety tradeoffs of smaller cars







      http://money.
      <http://money.cnn.com/2009/04/14/autos/iihs_small_vs_big/index.htm?iref=were
      commend>
      cnn.com/2009/04/14/autos/iihs_small_vs_big/index.htm?iref=werecommend

      >Danger even in 'safe' small cars
      >The Insurance Institute crashes small cars into larger ones to show what
      could happen in real wrecks.

      >By Peter Valdes-Dapena, CNNMoney.com senior writer
      >April 14, 2009: 4:08 AM ET
      >

      [...]

      >The small cars involved in all three tests - the Toyota Yaris,
      >Honda Fit and Smart ForTwo - had already earned top scores for
      >front impact protection in the Institute's standard front impact
      >test in which cars are crashed into a crushable barrier, not
      >another car.
      >
      >That test simulates two cars of roughly equal size hitting almost
      >head-on.
      >
      >In these new experimental tests the Institute wanted to show what
      >would happen to a small car in a crash with a larger vehicle. So
      >instead of crashing the cars into a stationary barrier,
      >researchers created actual collisions between small and midsized
      >cars.
      >
      >This time, the same small cars that had top marks in regular
      >crash tests earned poor ratings for impact protection.

      [...]






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • arcologic
      I have another idea on how to deal with the danger of large cars. (Yes, it s the large cars that are dangerous.) I suggest replacing simple speed limits with
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 20, 2009
        I have another idea on how to deal with the danger of large cars. (Yes, it's the large cars that are dangerous.)

        I suggest replacing simple speed limits with momentum limits instead. Your individual limit on a highway would be the product of the car's empty weight and its speed. If a 3000 pound car is allowed to go 60, then a 6000 pound car would be limited to 30 mph.

        This is a practical way of dealing with the problems of big cars, and I think many people would think it is fair.

        In my view, all speed limits should be lowered just a small amount while we are trying to deal with our energy and GHG crisis.

        Ernie Rogers


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • murdoch
        I tend to agree to remind people that the answer is not for everyone to size up to some humongous tanks for everyone. Many people drive a higher-mass car
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 20, 2009
          I tend to agree to remind people that the answer is not for everyone
          to "size up" to some humongous tanks for everyone. Many people drive
          a higher-mass car than they need to drive and hopefully we can find a
          policy solution (as Ernie strives to do) to incentivize them to move
          to lower-mass vehicles.

          However, a separate issue is that any move toward reducing the mass of
          cars does not take into account that cars (and 2-wheelers) share the
          road with trucks, delivery vehicles, buses, other larger vehicles and
          18-wheelers.

          The mixing of those heavier vehicles with the smaller cars cannot be
          dealt with so easily as just getting rid of them. They are necessary
          and important for a variety of transportation tasks. We have done a
          bit to try to make the roads safer to share, but this does not make
          the roads fully safe.

          I suppose a primitive example of executing a portion of Ernie's
          suggestion is the lower speed limit for 18-wheelers that you see in
          some areas California = 55 mph and drive on the right?).



          [Default] On Sun, 19 Apr 2009 22:44:53 -0400, "Ron Cochran"
          <rcochran@...> wrote:

          >This sounds like yet another good reason to get rid of the large cars!
          >
          >Ron
          >
          >
          > _____
          >
          >From: future-fuels-and-vehicles@yahoogroups.com
          >[mailto:future-fuels-and-vehicles@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of murdoch
          >Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2009 5:01 PM
          >To: murdoch@...
          >Subject: [future-fuels-and-vehicles] safety tradeoffs of smaller cars
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >http://money.
          ><http://money.cnn.com/2009/04/14/autos/iihs_small_vs_big/index.htm?iref=were
          >commend>
          >cnn.com/2009/04/14/autos/iihs_small_vs_big/index.htm?iref=werecommend
          >
          >>Danger even in 'safe' small cars
          >>The Insurance Institute crashes small cars into larger ones to show what
          >could happen in real wrecks.
          >
          >>By Peter Valdes-Dapena, CNNMoney.com senior writer
          >>April 14, 2009: 4:08 AM ET
          >>
          >
          >[...]
          >
          >>The small cars involved in all three tests - the Toyota Yaris,
          >>Honda Fit and Smart ForTwo - had already earned top scores for
          >>front impact protection in the Institute's standard front impact
          >>test in which cars are crashed into a crushable barrier, not
          >>another car.
          >>
          >>That test simulates two cars of roughly equal size hitting almost
          >>head-on.
          >>
          >>In these new experimental tests the Institute wanted to show what
          >>would happen to a small car in a crash with a larger vehicle. So
          >>instead of crashing the cars into a stationary barrier,
          >>researchers created actual collisions between small and midsized
          >>cars.
          >>
          >>This time, the same small cars that had top marks in regular
          >>crash tests earned poor ratings for impact protection.
          >
          >[...]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.