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Re: H2 as the motor fuel of the future

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  • csceadraham
    ... http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/future-fuels-and-vehicles/message/12052 ... No. The only thing that can leak anywhere near as well as hydrogen is
    Message 1 of 24 , Jul 5, 2008
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      --- In
      http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/future-fuels-and-vehicles/message/12052
      Yodda Pierce <ntsl532@...> wrote:

      > It was interesting to read the DOE hydrogen report
      > to see that hydrogen is flammable at a very wide range of
      > mixtures from 4-75%, while gasoline is only flammable
      > from 1-7.6%. Gasoline has a very limited and narrow range
      > for flammability compared with hydrogen.
      >
      > Also, the article discussed the leakage issues surrounding
      > hydrogen. It would seem that hydrogen presents a much
      > greater leakage concern than other gas and liquid fuels.
      > The report does discuss that the hydrogen gas can diffuse
      > easily, however, what if the gas leaked into the passenger
      > compartment of the car. Is there a tracer gas with it?

      No. The only thing that can leak anywhere near
      as well as hydrogen is helium.

      > If not then it is orderless and you can't smell it
      > unlike gasoline leaks.
      > You could have a hydrogen gas leak into the passenger
      > compartment and someone could light a cigarette
      > and the whole car blows up.

      I understand the minimum spark energy to ignite H2-air
      is much less than for any other fuel-air mixture.
      Just shifting in one's seat would probably do it.

      Thus, in the hydrogen accident postmortems I've read,
      I have seen no evidence that they even tried to figure
      out what the ignition source was. Could have been anything.

      All this, I learned *after* I noticed that it's not
      the zero-local-emission fuel with the lowest mass
      per unit energy; not unless you have a thousand-tonne car.
      And in that case, you would probably want direct nuclear
      propulsion.


      --- G.R.L. Cowan, H2 energy fan 'til ~1996
      http://www.eagle.ca/~gcowan/boron_blast.html
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