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Cylindrical Immersive Cinema.

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  • Videometry
    Hello fulldomers, I have been a member of this forum for a couple of years. Though I’m not fortunate enough to actually work in, or develop for a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 15, 2013
      Hello fulldomers,

      I have been a member of this forum for a couple of years. Though I’m not
      fortunate enough to actually work in, or develop for a planetarium,
      fulldome is the closest thing there is to my passion, namely cylindrical
      panoramic screens.

      I would really appreciate the communities opinions and input regarding a
      “new” format for immersive film and interactive experiences. As usual,
      nothing is trulynew, and panoramic cinematography has been around since
      the mid 50’s. Interestingly enough, back in 1955 it was the next “big
      thing” after 3D.

      For the past many years I’ve been attempting (and mostly failing!) to
      develop a display together with a film director friend of mine, for
      showing immersive, panoramic film, as well as real-time 3D, etc. for use
      in Museum installations. The standard screen, or “half-pipe” as it’s
      been dubbed, has a diameter of 10ft, and has a view height of over 7ft.
      So the entire screen has a diagonal size of over 200”.

      The screen is built of 6 sections, each 60 degrees, in a 3 x 2
      configuration.
      (example 3D rendering
      )
      Here’s a quick video of a single unit running in my workroom.


      Inside there’s a projector, and some newly developed optics to deliver a
      rear projected image that is in focus across the entire screen area,
      with even illumination, and virtually zero geometric distortion.
      We experimented with warping software, but in the end elected to make
      hardware that would alleviate the need for digital warping, to reduce
      cost, maximise pixel usage, eliminate latency, and give us one less hoop
      to jump through when creating stereoscopic 3D content.

      This format could, I feel, be a good supplement to full dome
      blockbusters, and even display content originally developed for
      fulldome, even though it has a distinctly different profile. Where a
      dome might seat 200 people, the halfpipe is designed for a large family,
      all standing. Where a dome is capable of 360 degree views, the half-pipe
      is 180. (It could in theory be a 360 degree “tube”, but I haven’t worked
      out how you’d get in and out!). The strengths of the half-pipe format,
      apart from being low cost, are that it canaccommodatethe continous flow
      of guests around a conventional museum, possibly running a film or
      animation in 3 minute loop. Also, it’s suited to interactive
      presentations, simulators, etc.

      I’d be very interested to hear the thoughts of content creators (do you
      think fulldome content could be successfully re-purposed?), curators (do
      you see a value in delivering your presentations in this way?) and
      anyone really with an opinion, be it positive or negative. Potential
      investors also most welcome :)

      We are a fledgling company just starting out, and all your feedback
      would be very much appreciated and extremely valuable to us.

      Thanks for listening!

      Peter Strømberg
    • Eric Knisley
      Hi Peter, (I did not see a video attached to your post, or a link) As it happens, I have a long history in immersive projection systems, starting with the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 15, 2013
        Hi Peter,
        (I did not see a video attached to your post, or a link)

        As it happens, I have a long history in immersive projection systems,
        starting with the Elumens immersive dome systems and carrying forward to
        a panoramic theater system at the North Carolina Museum of Natural
        Sciences, so I know a bit about the subject.

        I'm currently working on interactive 3D content for our Pano Theater.
        You can see a short demo here:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqKWrXX-yQ0&feature=youtu.be
        (I wrote the music too!)

        In my experience, pre-rendered fulldome presentations do not port very
        well to panoramic systems. There's just too much of the data missing.
        Real-time presentations, in my experience, are easier to port back and
        forth. For example, the Omnity plugin (from Elumenati) for Unity 3D
        allows pretty fast re-purposing, as does the WorldComposer software
        (also from Elumenati). Of course, no matter what approach you use, some
        re-formatting/re-coding/re-working will be involved.

        Real-time rendering obviously involves some trade-offs, but there are
        good reasons to consider that approach. I'd be happy to discuss it with
        you, if you like. You can reach me at the museum at 919.707.9275

        Hope that's helpful! Best luck with your system,

        --ek



        On 1/15/2013 2:09 PM, Videometry wrote:
        Hello fulldomers,

        I have been a member of this forum for a couple of years. Though I�m not
        fortunate enough to actually work in, or develop for a planetarium,
        fulldome is the closest thing there is to my passion, namely cylindrical
        panoramic screens.

        I would really appreciate the communities opinions and input regarding a
        �new� format for immersive film and interactive experiences. As usual,
        nothing is trulynew, and panoramic cinematography has been around since
        the mid 50�s. Interestingly enough, back in 1955 it was the next �big
        thing� after 3D.

        For the past many years I�ve been attempting (and mostly failing!) to
        develop a display together with a film director friend of mine, for
        showing immersive, panoramic film, as well as real-time 3D, etc. for use
        in Museum installations. The standard screen, or �half-pipe� as it�s
        been dubbed, has a diameter of 10ft, and has a view height of over 7ft.
        So the entire screen has a diagonal size of over 200�.

        The screen is built of 6 sections, each 60 degrees, in a 3 x 2
        configuration.
        (example 3D rendering
        )
        Here�s a quick video of a single unit running in my workroom.


        Inside there�s a projector, and some newly developed optics to deliver a
        rear projected image that is in focus across the entire screen area,
        with even illumination, and virtually zero geometric distortion.
        We experimented with warping software, but in the end elected to make
        hardware that would alleviate the need for digital warping, to reduce
        cost, maximise pixel usage, eliminate latency, and give us one less hoop
        to jump through when creating stereoscopic 3D content.

        This format could, I feel, be a good supplement to full dome
        blockbusters, and even display content originally developed for
        fulldome, even though it has a distinctly different profile. Where a
        dome might seat 200 people, the halfpipe is designed for a large family,
        all standing. Where a dome is capable of 360 degree views, the half-pipe
        is 180. (It could in theory be a 360 degree �tube�, but I haven�t worked
        out how you�d get in and out!). The strengths of the half-pipe format,
        apart from being low cost, are that it canaccommodatethe continous flow
        of guests around a conventional museum, possibly running a film or
        animation in 3 minute loop. Also, it�s suited to interactive
        presentations, simulators, etc.

        I�d be very interested to hear the thoughts of content creators (do you
        think fulldome content could be successfully re-purposed?), curators (do
        you see a value in delivering your presentations in this way?) and
        anyone really with an opinion, be it positive or negative. Potential
        investors also most welcome :)

        We are a fledgling company just starting out, and all your feedback
        would be very much appreciated and extremely valuable to us.

        Thanks for listening!

        Peter Str�mberg


        --

        Eric Knisley
        Cartoonist | Illustrator | Animator | Photographer
        Carrboro | NC | US | www.silent-k.net
        +1 919-491-7406
      • Videometry
        Seems HTML links were stripped. Here s a video of a single 60 degree bezeless unit, which can be used to build many configurations.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 15, 2013
          Seems HTML links were stripped.
          Here's a video of a single 60 degree bezeless unit, which can be used to
          build many configurations.
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zo7b8annwnw


          And a 3d render of a standard set-up.
          http://www.videometry.net/virturama/Virturama_rover.jpg


          [Note: I have HTML support turned off, to avoid viruses, etc. --Moderator]


          --
          Peter Strømberg
          Skovvej 11
          8382 Hinnerup
          DENMARK

          mobil: (+45) 60 44 08 80

          On Jan 15, 2013 20:09 "Videometry" wrote:

          Hello fulldomers,

          I have been a member of this forum for a couple of years. Though I�m not
          fortunate enough to actually work in, or develop for a planetarium,
          fulldome is the closest thing there is to my passion, namely cylindrical
          panoramic screens.

          I would really appreciate the communities opinions and input regarding a
          �new� format for immersive film and interactive experiences. As usual,
          nothing is trulynew, and panoramic cinematography has been around since
          the mid 50�s. Interestingly enough, back in 1955 it was the next �big
          thing� after 3D.

          For the past many years I�ve been attempting (and mostly failing!) to
          develop a display together with a film director friend of mine, for
          showing immersive, panoramic film, as well as real-time 3D, etc. for use
          in Museum installations. The standard screen, or �half-pipe� as it�s
          been dubbed, has a diameter of 10ft, and has a view height of over 7ft.
          So the entire screen has a diagonal size of over 200�.

          The screen is built of 6 sections, each 60 degrees, in a 3 x 2
          configuration.
          (example 3D rendering
          )
          Here�s a quick video of a single unit running in my workroom.


          Inside there�s a projector, and some newly developed optics to deliver a
          rear projected image that is in focus across the entire screen area,
          with even illumination, and virtually zero geometric distortion.
          We experimented with warping software, but in the end elected to make
          hardware that would alleviate the need for digital warping, to reduce
          cost, maximise pixel usage, eliminate latency, and give us one less hoop
          to jump through when creating stereoscopic 3D content.

          This format could, I feel, be a good supplement to full dome
          blockbusters, and even display content originally developed for
          fulldome, even though it has a distinctly different profile. Where a
          dome might seat 200 people, the halfpipe is designed for a large family,
          all standing. Where a dome is capable of 360 degree views, the half-pipe
          is 180. (It could in theory be a 360 degree �tube�, but I haven�t worked
          out how you�d get in and out!). The strengths of the half-pipe format,
          apart from being low cost, are that it canaccommodatethe continous flow
          of guests around a conventional museum, possibly running a film or
          animation in 3 minute loop. Also, it�s suited to interactive
          presentations, simulators, etc.

          I�d be very interested to hear the thoughts of content creators (do you
          think fulldome content could be successfully re-purposed?), curators (do
          you see a value in delivering your presentations in this way?) and
          anyone really with an opinion, be it positive or negative. Potential
          investors also most welcome :)

          We are a fledgling company just starting out, and all your feedback
          would be very much appreciated and extremely valuable to us.

          Thanks for listening!

          Peter Str�mberg
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