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IMERSA's Fulldome Summit takes a look at the up and coming

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  • SARAH
    Oct 26-28 Denver Fulldome in Development Producers will present teaser clips: Origins, Ryan Wyatt, California Academy of Sciences Dynamic Earth, Thomas Lucas,
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 12, 2010
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      Oct 26-28
      Denver

      Fulldome in Development
      Producers will present teaser clips:

      Origins, Ryan Wyatt, California Academy of Sciences
      Dynamic Earth, Thomas Lucas, DMNS – NCSA – Spitz
      Crossing Worlds, Eric Hanson, XRez – Grand Canyon by Nature
      Bella Gaia, Kenji Williams, Remedy Arts – Vortex Immersion Media
      Wildest Weather in The Solar System, National Geographic Cinema Ventures
      Listen This Good, Jeff Skinner

      The Summit is held in conjunction with the Symposium for Media and Museum Professionals
      hosted by the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science

      Register and find more info here ... http://www.jhfestival.org/jhsymposium/programs.htm
    • Ryan Wyatt
      ... Among others... Just to clarify, we will present the first three and a half minutes of Life: A Cosmic Journey, a new production which will premiere in
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 15, 2010
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        On Oct 12, 2010, at 10:44 AM, SARAH wrote:

        > Fulldome in Development
        > Producers will present teaser clips:

        > Origins, Ryan Wyatt, California Academy of Sciences

        Among others...

        Just to clarify, we will present the first three and a half minutes of
        "Life: A Cosmic Journey," a new production which will premiere in San
        Francisco on 6 November. As it happens, we just put up our trailer
        yesterday:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4LpmWe1YA4

        A distribution version is planned for early 2011.

        As an aside, something we've been thinking about here is how to
        promote our content without the carbon footprint (and other ecological
        impacts) of DVDs. Has anyone on the list looked at having limited-
        access content available online? Ideally, we'd do something like an
        iTunes card at Starbucks: a potential customer would get a code
        they'd use to access the content, then we'd track who's accessing the
        video, etc.

        Anyway, I look forward to seeing some of you in Denver! I hope you
        can come check out the work in development... Not just for our lovely
        three and a half minutes, but for all the good work being highlighted.


        Ryan Wyatt, Director
        Morrison Planetarium and Science Visualization
        California Academy of Sciences
        55 Music Concourse Drive
        San Francisco, CA 94118
      • Jon Strawn
        We (ARTS Lab) have had some success with distributing material via our file server. For these cases we typically will put the material online, give the
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 15, 2010
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          We (ARTS Lab) have had some success with distributing material via our file
          server. For these cases we typically will put the material online, give the
          necessary parties the access information, then take it down once they've
          downloaded what they need. The server is private, so any access outside of our
          internal users is easy to track.

          I'm assuming that you're talking about a storefront approach, and as long as you
          are talking DVD size content then I don't see why a similar (but obviously
          automated) approach wouldn't work. Of course, that's still a large single file
          transfer.

          How about setting up a torrent that distributes large content, so that you don't
          have to have a marathon download session? I haven't done it myself, but I've
          read about people using private torrents to distribute large files among a
          select group. The upper limit on file size in that case would be determined by
          your speed requirements.

          If you're talking strictly promotional material, why not distribute
          biodegradable cards printed with QR codes that access private sites full of
          videos & such. For all things like that, if you host it on your own
          servers unobtrusively tracking who is looking at it when should be pretty easy.
          If you want to build a customer database, you could even just have it redirect
          to a simple form asking for an email before it shows them the cool stuff.

          -jon


          From: Ryan Wyatt <ryan@...>

          [...]

          As an aside, something we've been thinking about here is how to
          promote our content without the carbon footprint (and other ecological
          impacts) of DVDs. Has anyone on the list looked at having limited-
          access content available online? Ideally, we'd do something like an
          iTunes card at Starbucks: a potential customer would get a code
          they'd use to access the content, then we'd track who's accessing the
          video, etc.


          Ryan Wyatt, Director
          Morrison Planetarium and Science Visualization
          California Academy of Sciences
          55 Music Concourse Drive
          San Francisco, CA 94118
        • Jennie Zeiher
          Hi Jon, A torrent for online distribution is a good idea. Aspera is widely used in screen media industries and has fast transfer times. Jennie
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 15, 2010
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            Hi Jon,

            A torrent for online distribution is a good idea.

            Aspera is widely used in screen media industries and has fast transfer
            times.

            Jennie

            > How about setting up a torrent that distributes large content, so
            > that you don't have to have a marathon download session?
          • Harfiyah@lamaan.com
            Hi John, Many thanks for this very useful post! I d got as far as Yousendit, but some of these options look promising. Will investigate further. Harfiyah
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 17, 2010
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              Hi John,

              Many thanks for this very useful post! I'd got as far as Yousendit, but some of these options look promising. Will investigate further.

              Harfiyah


              From: fulldome@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fulldome@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jon Strawn
              Sent: 15 October 2010 22:11
              To: fulldome@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [fulldome] Online Content Distribution (Was Re: IMERSA's Fulldome Summit takes a look at the up and coming)


              We (ARTS Lab) have had some success with distributing material via our file
              server. For these cases we typically will put the material online, give the
              necessary parties the access information, then take it down once they've
              downloaded what they need. The server is private, so any access outside of our
              internal users is easy to track.

              I'm assuming that you're talking about a storefront approach, and as long as you
              are talking DVD size content then I don't see why a similar (but obviously
              automated) approach wouldn't work. Of course, that's still a large single file
              transfer.

              How about setting up a torrent that distributes large content, so that you don't
              have to have a marathon download session? I haven't done it myself, but I've
              read about people using private torrents to distribute large files among a
              select group. The upper limit on file size in that case would be determined by
              your speed requirements.

              If you're talking strictly promotional material, why not distribute
              biodegradable cards printed with QR codes that access private sites full of
              videos & such. For all things like that, if you host it on your own
              servers unobtrusively tracking who is looking at it when should be pretty easy.
              If you want to build a customer database, you could even just have it redirect
              to a simple form asking for an email before it shows them the cool stuff.

              -jon

              From: Ryan Wyatt <ryan@... <mailto:ryan%40ryanwyatt.net> >

              [...]

              As an aside, something we've been thinking about here is how to
              promote our content without the carbon footprint (and other ecological
              impacts) of DVDs. Has anyone on the list looked at having limited-
              access content available online? Ideally, we'd do something like an
              iTunes card at Starbucks: a potential customer would get a code
              they'd use to access the content, then we'd track who's accessing the
              video, etc.

              Ryan Wyatt, Director
              Morrison Planetarium and Science Visualization
              California Academy of Sciences
              55 Music Concourse Drive
              San Francisco, CA 94118
            • Ryan Wyatt
              Okay, I can t even get the name of my own show right. Life: A Cosmic STORY will premiere at the California Academy of Sciences on 6 November 2010. Sigh. ===
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 17, 2010
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                Okay, I can't even get the name of my own show right. "Life: A Cosmic
                STORY" will premiere at the California Academy of Sciences on 6
                November 2010.

                Sigh.

                ===

                On Oct 12, 2010, at 10:44 AM, SARAH wrote:

                > Fulldome in Development
                > Producers will present teaser clips:

                > Origins, Ryan Wyatt, California Academy of Sciences

                Among others...

                Just to clarify, we will present the first three and a half minutes of
                "Life: A Cosmic Journey," a new production which will premiere in San
                Francisco on 6 November. As it happens, we just put up our trailer
                yesterday:
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4LpmWe1YA4

                A distribution version is planned for early 2011.

                As an aside, something we've been thinking about here is how to
                promote our content without the carbon footprint (and other ecological
                impacts) of DVDs. Has anyone on the list looked at having limited-
                access content available online? Ideally, we'd do something like an
                iTunes card at Starbucks: a potential customer would get a code
                they'd use to access the content, then we'd track who's accessing the
                video, etc.

                Anyway, I look forward to seeing some of you in Denver! I hope you
                can come check out the work in development... Not just for our lovely
                three and a half minutes, but for all the good work being highlighted.


                Ryan Wyatt, Director
                Morrison Planetarium and Science Visualization
                California Academy of Sciences
                55 Music Concourse Drive
                San Francisco, CA 94118
              • david beining
                ... Right, we use an SFTP server (built by Jon s little bro, David Strawn) for secure transfers. NB: We ve only used it for transfers of
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 18, 2010
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                  A little more on this subject:

                  > We (ARTS Lab) have had some success with distributing material via our file
                  > server. For these cases we typically will put the material online, give the
                  > necessary parties the access information, then take it down once they've
                  > downloaded what they need. The server is private, so any access outside of our
                  > internal users is easy to track.

                  Right, we use an SFTP server (built by Jon's little bro, David Strawn) for secure transfers. NB: We've only used it for transfers of <100GB. Works great for encoded ('sliced') shows of multi-channel domes, mirror-dome video, and trailers/replacement frames. Using a good browser like Filezilla or even Cyberduck allows you to pick up dropped transfers so you're not starting from scratch. Transferring full show frames (~350-650GB) is still a challenge even in a research university network setting.

                  Anyway, for DVD-sized content, seems you could write a FTP/SFTP browser script to add users (an email address from the requester) that sunsets after a period of time and limits number of downloads. That'd take a wee bit of management in running the script with each request. Or you could script a series of passwords (your iTunes code or Jon's QR idea; could be a simple series of numbers) that sunset after N number of uses. I have no idea if that work in a torrent session but it'd be grand if it did.

                  d
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