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Re: IPS Conference Alexandria, Egypt

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  • Harfiyah@lamaan.com
    Hi Alexander, I was interested to see your title 3000 Years of Stargazing - so appropriate for IPS Alexandria - thinking that it might include the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 22, 2010
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      Hi Alexander,

      I was interested to see your title 3000 Years of Stargazing - so appropriate
      for IPS Alexandria - thinking that it might include the contributions of
      the Egyptian, Indian, Chinese and Islamic Civilizations. Alas, when I read
      the blurb it seemed to have missed all these out completely and stuck to the
      conventional Eurocentric wisdom that Astronomy started with the Greeks and
      skipped a millennium to the astounding discovery of the telescope by
      Galileo.

      This convention is slowly being blown to pieces by the emergence of
      information about the missing millennium, and how the Islamic civilization
      collected astronomical knowledge from all these other civilizations,
      including the Greeks, examined, sifted and developed it to a point where the
      Europeans in closest contact with Islam (Spain, Italy and Southern France,
      as well as some scholars from England and Scotland) were able to translate
      it from Arabic into Latin and so benefit from this vast treasure-house of
      knowledge. Galileo may or may not have invented the telescope, but the
      technology and science he used to make it were all gained from the Islamic
      civilisation.

      Much of this information is now available on the Internet. You can look up
      Al-Biruni, Ibn al-Haytham, Al-Battani, Ulugh Beg's observatory, and go from
      there.

      This is true not only of Astronomy but of all the sciences, industries and
      technologies developed on the back of Islamic knowledge since the 12th
      century.

      See www.Muslimheritage.com for further information.

      I hope someone soon will make a fulldome history that does include at least
      some of this information.

      Best wishes for the conference,


      Harfiyah


      From: fulldome@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fulldome@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of alezarg
      Sent: 22 June 2010 11:07
      To: fulldome@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [fulldome] IPS Conference Alexandria, Egypt


      Hello everybody!

      The Antares FullDome Productions crew will be present at the IPS Conference
      2010 in Alexandria, Egypt during the entire event.

      Starting Sunday, we will be show casing the programs ¨Astronomy; 3000 Years
      Of Stargazing¨, ¨Chronicle A Journey To Earth¨ and ¨The Birth Of The Solar
      System¨ on several occasion every day in the portable domes of Quim Guixà
      right by the entrance of the exhibition hall. Please, come by and see us
      there!

      Our productions can be found here; http://www.antares-fulldome.com/ where
      you can watch and download trailers, tech comp tests, specs, etc.

      See you in Alexandria!

      Best wishes,

      Alexander Zaragoza
      Product Manager
      Antares FullDome Productions

      azaragoza@... <mailto:azaragoza%40antares-fulldome.com>
      Skype: antares_fulldome
      www.antares-fulldome.com

      Trajà 2, 1º 1ª
      08004 Barcelona
      Spain
      tel. (+34) 933 323 000
      cell (+34) 669 702 388
      fax. (+34) 933 323 130
    • Alexander Zaragoza
      Dear Harfiyah, You definitely have a point there, but, as you know, astronomy is such a rich science, and so many people from all around the world have
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 26, 2010
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        Dear Harfiyah,

        You definitely have a point there, but, as you know, astronomy is such a
        rich science, and so many people from all around the world have
        contributed to enriching it and making it grow, that it would be
        impossible to mention all names, artifacts and conceptions developed in
        3000 years.

        Our intention was not to suggest that astronomy began with the ancient
        Greek, but we had to constrain time and space within the film, and it
        seemed to us that it has been in the last 3000 years that astronomy
        followed an ascending line in knowledge and inventions. The Arab
        contributions are of course extremely important and appreciated in the
        development of the science, as it would not have been possible without
        them. In fact, these contributions are included in the script of the
        program ¨Astronomy - 3 000 Years of Stargazing¨ commencing with "During
        this period, the ancient Babylonian, Egyptian and Greek astronomical
        legacies were kept alive by Arabic cultures, which preserved and refined
        such artifacts as the Astrolabe."

        We didn't pretend to focus academically in the history of astronomy, we
        simply tried to popularize this science, especially with developments
        from Galileo and Newton to the most recent inventions (this period
        covers more than 3/4 of the running time of the film) while also
        enticing children and youngsters to understand and get enthusiastic
        about the state of the art earth- and space based telescopes, the
        current knowledge of astronomy and future challenges. Our intention is
        to encourage them to go stargazing...

        In any case, thanks so much for your comments. We really appreciate your
        points. These days, in Alexandria, at the IPS 2010 we will celebrate the
        city as the cradle of astronomy; it is an honor and a pleasure to get to
        know more about the Arab contributions to this science we all love so much.

        All the best,
        Alexander Zaragoza

        On 23/06/2010 7:27, Harfiyah@... wrote:

        > I was interested to see your title 3000 Years of Stargazing - so appropriate
        > for IPS Alexandria - thinking that it might include the contributions of
        > the Egyptian, Indian, Chinese and Islamic Civilizations. Alas, when I read
        > the blurb it seemed to have missed all these out completely and stuck to the
        > conventional Eurocentric wisdom that Astronomy started with the Greeks and
        > skipped a millennium to the astounding discovery of the telescope by
        > Galileo.

        > This convention is slowly being blown to pieces by the emergence of
        > information about the missing millennium, and how the Islamic civilization
        > collected astronomical knowledge from all these other civilizations,
        > including the Greeks, examined, sifted and developed it to a point where the
        > Europeans in closest contact with Islam (Spain, Italy and Southern France,
        > as well as some scholars from England and Scotland) were able to translate
        > it from Arabic into Latin and so benefit from this vast treasure-house of
        > knowledge. Galileo may or may not have invented the telescope, but the
        > technology and science he used to make it were all gained from the Islamic
        > civilisation.

        > Much of this information is now available on the Internet. You can look up
        > Al-Biruni, Ibn al-Haytham, Al-Battani, Ulugh Beg's observatory, and go from
        > there.

        > This is true not only of Astronomy but of all the sciences, industries and
        > technologies developed on the back of Islamic knowledge since the 12th
        > century.

        > See www.Muslimheritage.com for further information.

        > I hope someone soon will make a fulldome history that does include at least
        > some of this information.

        > Best wishes for the conference,

        > Harfiyah

        --
        Alexander Zaragoza
        Product Manager
        Antares FullDome Productions

        azaragoza@...
        Skype: antares_fulldome
        www.antares-fulldome.com

        Trajà 2, 1º 1ª
        08004 Barcelona
        Spain
        tel. (+34) 933 323 000
        fax. (+34) 933 323 130
      • Harfiyah@lamaan.com
        Dear Alexander, Thanks for your gracious letter. I m glad you did include something in your film about the Arabs and are open to learning about the
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 27, 2010
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          Dear Alexander,

          Thanks for your gracious letter. I'm glad you did include something in your
          film about the Arabs and are open to learning about the contributions of
          other civilizations to Astronomy and the other sciences. At the moment I'm
          correcting the second edition of a book on the 'Hidden Debt to Islamic
          Civilization', which is around 800 pages and makes a very strong case for
          the wide-ranging influence of Islamic civilization on Europe from the 12th
          century onwards, clearly showing the ways in which Islamic learning was
          disseminated throughout Europe and beyond. The author, Salah Al-Jazairi has
          also written an equally vast and impressive book on 'The Golden Age and
          Decline of Islamic Civilisation'
          http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/search?index=books&linkCode=qs&keywords=095511563
          9

          I hope you are enjoying Alexandria and will read your blog.

          Best wishes,

          Harfiyah
        • Harfiyah@lamaan.com
          Hi Alexander, Here, in case you missed it, is a survey form about the Library of Secrets film. We d be grateful if you could fill this in and return it to
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 30, 2010
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            Hi Alexander,

            Here, in case you missed it, is a survey form about the 'Library of Secrets'
            film.

            We'd be grateful if you could fill this in and return it to
            ahmed@... .

            Best wishes,

            Harfiyah

            -----Original Message-----
            From: fulldome@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fulldome@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of Alexander Zaragoza
            Sent: 26 June 2010 11:08
            To: fulldome@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: IPS Conference Alexandria, Egypt

            Dear Harfiyah,

            You definitely have a point there, but, as you know, astronomy is such a
            rich science, and so many people from all around the world have
            contributed to enriching it and making it grow, that it would be
            impossible to mention all names, artifacts and conceptions developed in
            3000 years.

            Our intention was not to suggest that astronomy began with the ancient
            Greek, but we had to constrain time and space within the film, and it
            seemed to us that it has been in the last 3000 years that astronomy
            followed an ascending line in knowledge and inventions. The Arab
            contributions are of course extremely important and appreciated in the
            development of the science, as it would not have been possible without
            them. In fact, these contributions are included in the script of the
            program ¨Astronomy - 3 000 Years of Stargazing¨ commencing with "During
            this period, the ancient Babylonian, Egyptian and Greek astronomical
            legacies were kept alive by Arabic cultures, which preserved and refined
            such artifacts as the Astrolabe."

            We didn't pretend to focus academically in the history of astronomy, we
            simply tried to popularize this science, especially with developments
            from Galileo and Newton to the most recent inventions (this period
            covers more than 3/4 of the running time of the film) while also
            enticing children and youngsters to understand and get enthusiastic
            about the state of the art earth- and space based telescopes, the
            current knowledge of astronomy and future challenges. Our intention is
            to encourage them to go stargazing...

            In any case, thanks so much for your comments. We really appreciate your
            points. These days, in Alexandria, at the IPS 2010 we will celebrate the
            city as the cradle of astronomy; it is an honor and a pleasure to get to
            know more about the Arab contributions to this science we all love so much.

            All the best,
            Alexander Zaragoza
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