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Composition

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  • Rich Brown
    The rule of thirds is firmly established in painting and still photography. (See http://www.photo96.com/blog/?p=371 for some pretty examples.) The rule may
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 10, 2008
      The "rule of thirds" is firmly established in painting and still
      photography. (See http://www.photo96.com/blog/?p=371 for some pretty
      examples.) The rule may be a bit less rigid in video and motion picture
      photography, but if you watch for it you'll see tons of examples at your
      local cineplex.

      Should we be following a rule of thirds while making fulldome video?

      (My feeling is no; the rule of thirds tries to get you to position items
      of interest at a certain position with relation to the frame, and we're
      all about making people forget the frame exists. I want to see what
      others think about this, though.)
    • Tom Casey
      It s the same idea, just applied differently... the issue is, where are the dividing lines? Since you are not seeing the dome in the full-view circle that
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 10, 2008
        It's the same idea, just applied differently... the issue is, where
        are the dividing lines? Since you are not "seeing" the dome in the
        full-view circle that we view on our computer monitors, that's not
        where we apply the rules. Although I always use the thirds grid on
        my Leica camera when shooting with it, I have to admit I've not used
        the thirds approach when creating for fulldome... but just used basic
        overall composition concepts... or might I say what "feels" good from
        experience

        It will be an interesting discussion as to what producers have
        experienced. I would have to say that one of the lines to divide up
        might be from the rim of the dome to the zenith, that being one
        dimension. I know we are always looking at how high towards the
        zenith objects are in a scene, hoping to have something looming over
        the viewer.

        Another approach would be to view everything from the audience's
        viewpoint... although we are fulldome, the viewer still sees with the
        somewhat rectangular view the eye (or the mind) sees. So the
        fulldome image is always being "framed" by the viewer... and
        composition is determined by where they are looking.

        I'll agree with Rich that it's a lot different with motion imagery
        where the path of an object through the view is primary. What do
        other producers think?

        Tom


        On Aug 10, 2008, at 11:22 AM, Rich Brown wrote:

        The "rule of thirds" is firmly established in painting and still
        photography. (See http://www.photo96.com/blog/?p=371 for some pretty
        examples.) The rule may be a bit less rigid in video and motion picture
        photography, but if you watch for it you'll see tons of examples at your
        local cineplex.

        Should we be following a rule of thirds while making fulldome video?

        (My feeling is no; the rule of thirds tries to get you to position items
        of interest at a certain position with relation to the frame, and we're
        all about making people forget the frame exists. I want to see what
        others think about this, though.)



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        Tom Casey
        President & Creative Director

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