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Re: soil

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  • dayjean455
    Wow! it s the first time i heard of that use for women s mens... When i started having mine, the first blood was used to wipe the face as immunity from
    Message 1 of 30 , Jun 4, 2009
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      Wow! it's the first time i heard of that use for women's mens...

      When i started having mine, the first blood was used to wipe the face as immunity from eruptions...

      The POWER of a WOMAN!!!


      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Turner <shawndturner@...> wrote:
      >
      > Good Source of nitrogen as well as trace minerals
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: michael hollihn <michaelhollihn@...>
      > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2009 10:34:21 AM
      > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > michael, thanks for the clear vision, one thing i would add to urine
      > and humanure in the cycle is the woman's blood from her menses....when
      > i lived in the kootenays and gulf islands of bc there were many women
      > using a device called a keeper instead of a pad...this contained the
      > blood and they would add it to their tea's for their plants
      >
      > --
      > michael hollihn,
      > british columbia,
      > www.michaelhollihn. wordpress. com (bioregional timber frames)
      > www.kettleriverfood .ning.com (building food security in the kettle
      > River watershed)
      > 'Be the change that you want to see' ghandi
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Gary Granada
      Hello! We are looking for jathropa plantation for bio-diesel project investors here in Mindanao, Philippines. Sincerely, Gary B. Granada Davao City,
      Message 2 of 30 , Jun 9, 2009
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        Hello!

        We are looking for jathropa plantation for bio-diesel project investors here in Mindanao, Philippines.

        Sincerely,

        Gary B. Granada
        Davao City, Philippines
        email: eurosign888@...
        mobile: +639107921524
        --- On Thu, 6/4/09, Shawn Turner <shawndturner@...> wrote:

        From: Shawn Turner <shawndturner@...>
        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, June 4, 2009, 4:52 PM

















        Good Source of nitrogen as well as trace minerals



        ____________ _________ _________ __

        From: michael hollihn <michaelhollihn@ gmail.com>

        To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com

        Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2009 10:34:21 AM

        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil



        michael, thanks for the clear vision, one thing i would add to urine

        and humanure in the cycle is the woman's blood from her menses....when

        i lived in the kootenays and gulf islands of bc there were many women

        using a device called a keeper instead of a pad...this contained the

        blood and they would add it to their tea's for their plants



        --

        michael hollihn,

        british columbia,

        www.michaelhollihn. wordpress. com (bioregional timber frames)

        www.kettleriverfood .ning.com (building food security in the kettle

        River watershed)

        'Be the change that you want to see' ghandi



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Meredith
        Well, Dieter, maybe you should try the tierra prieta. Michael r most of the year, there is very little biomass production. Even on my level fields, which
        Message 3 of 30 , Nov 3, 2009
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          Well, Dieter, maybe you should try the tierra prieta.
          Michael

          r most of the year, there is very
          little biomass production. Even on my level fields, which haven’t
          been plowed for 14 years, the losses of humus due to the high
          temperatures are in some cases greater than what is added due to new
          plant growth. In these cases, the soil is actually impoverished by
          not plowing even when no crop is taken off the field.
        • Rev. Kyosan T. F. Katthagen
          Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra Preta will not do
          Message 4 of 30 , Nov 4, 2009
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            Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
            to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
            Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
            people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
            system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
            source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
            Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
            in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
            be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.

            Kyosan
          • Michael Meredith
            Kyosal, How do you know it will not work in dry areas? Wont water harvesting at least extend his season? Michael Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea -
            Message 5 of 30 , Nov 4, 2009
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              Kyosal,

              How do you know it will not work in dry areas?

              Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?


              Michael


              Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
              to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
              Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
              people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
              system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
              source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
              Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
              in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
              be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.

              Kyosan
            • michaeljking2007
              If lack of water is the main problem then maybe you could look into using swales to create a better environment for plants and then build on that with
              Message 6 of 30 , Nov 5, 2009
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                If lack of water is the main problem then maybe you could look into using swales to create a better environment for plants and then build on that with seedballs/natural farming:

                Greening the desert:
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S6kTlz6Mk4

                Michael



                --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Michael Meredith <meredith848@...> wrote:
                >
                > Kyosal,
                >
                > How do you know it will not work in dry areas?
                >
                > Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?
                >
                >
                > Michael
                >
                >
                > Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                > to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                > Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                > people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                > system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                > source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                > Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                > in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                > be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.
                >
                > Kyosan
                >
              • David Douglas
                Hello to all, Would you folks be able to recommend a site that describes producing charcoal for Terra Preta purposes on a small scale? I m not sure if I would
                Message 7 of 30 , Nov 5, 2009
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                  Hello to all,

                  Would you folks be able to recommend a site that describes producing
                  charcoal for Terra Preta purposes on a small scale?

                  I'm not sure if I would be able to do this here in the Adirondacks due to
                  the
                  strict new burn barrel laws and the amount of smoke that it would give off.
                  However, I would like to learn more about the procedure, in particular how
                  to
                  control the burn temperature so that the charcoal isn't overheated.

                  Thank you very much.
                  Best regards,

                  David Douglas
                  Adirondack Mountains
                  NY, US

                  www.artofdaviddouglas.com



                  On 11/4/09, Michael Meredith <meredith848@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Kyosal,
                  >
                  > How do you know it will not work in dry areas?
                  >
                  > Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?
                  >
                  > Michael
                  >
                  > Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                  > to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                  > Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                  > people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                  > system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                  > source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                  > Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                  > in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                  > be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.
                  >
                  > Kyosan
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Rev. Kyosan T. F. Katthagen
                  ... Dear Michael, I hope we do not missunderstand each other too much. I am not against Water Harvesting - it ´s a wonderful idea what everyone should
                  Message 8 of 30 , Nov 5, 2009
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                    Michael Meredith wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Kyosal,
                    >
                    > How do you know it will not work in dry areas?
                    >
                    > Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?
                    >
                    > Michael
                    >
                    > Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                    > to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                    > Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                    > people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                    > system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                    > source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                    > Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                    > in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                    > be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer
                    > owns.
                    >
                    > Kyosan
                    >
                    Dear Michael,

                    I hope we do not missunderstand each other too much. I am not against
                    Water Harvesting - it ´s a wonderful idea what everyone should practise
                    however and whereever. Off course it would extend Dieter´s potential for
                    longer time than without, but (I don´t know why there is always a *but*,
                    we have to take it as it is and live and work with it . ;-) ) in a long
                    dry season, like in Portugal, one would be in need of so much water,
                    that the owned land maybe would not be big enough. Everywhere collecting
                    pots, troughs, smaller or bigger lakes... whatever. And the agriculture
                    land will not grow, not just for a good idea. I would like to have it
                    work in a better way...

                    As well, Terra Preta is a very nice, very good and by ancient people
                    long time proofed tool. I will never say nothing against it. I myself
                    are in process of creating Terra Preta. But (Oh Lord! Another "but),
                    I´am living in a region with periodic rain. My rain harvesting this year
                    was absolutely more than succesfull! Thousands of liters in storage and
                    only a very few times in need to use. End of month September, when the
                    first cold and frosty nights came up, I had to let the water from the
                    storages go the nearby creek. Otherwise it would have blast my storage
                    containers.

                    The origin of Terra Preta is different from the climatic situation at my
                    or at Dieter´s location. Dieter´s location is, hmh, let me say: poor. My
                    location tends more too the rich. Off course different to the location
                    where Terra Preta was found. In Amazonian region there is coldness,
                    there are no frosty season like german winter. I am a german livingi
                    Southwest of Germany - latitude of Strassbourg/France. In wintertime
                    soil microbes in my region go to a kind of "sleep", like hedgehogs do.
                    Prücess of Terra Preta will also got to have a winter rest, start again
                    in spring time, depending on how long frosty climatic soil situation
                    will be. It is different from year to year, sometimes from October to
                    May, sometimes November to April - every changing possible. Absolutely
                    NOT the same like in Portugal or whereever in the world.

                    Water is the key for any process of life on this planet. Still our
                    common question is and will be: How to get enough.

                    You know what I mean?

                    In respect, Kyosan
                  • Michael Meredith
                    Seems to me that any one in a dry climate would want to do swales, tanks, and charcoal, as the charcoal is permanant, acts to hold onto water, and , further,
                    Message 9 of 30 , Nov 6, 2009
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                      Seems to me that any one in a dry climate would want to do swales, tanks, and charcoal, as the charcoal is permanant, acts to hold onto water, and , further, is a sponge for micro-organisms to hide in. In fact, many sewage plants, and bio-gas units, use charcoal for this very purpose. His organic matter blows away, or cooks off, in the amazon, it washes away, and cooks off. Could be something there(for the old Dieter).



                      Heres some more stuff I am doing...............

                      I finally got the clothing started on the 30 foot tall statue. See some photos here.............


                      .http://s122.photobucket.com/albums/o252/meredith848/?albumview=slideshow.

                      Then..... bigsculpture.org...., which explains it

                      Michael


                      >
                      > Kyosan
                      >
                      Dear Michael,

                      I hope we do not missunderstand each other too much. I am not against
                      Water Harvesting - it ´s a wonderful idea what everyone should practise
                      however and whereever. Off course it would extend Dieter´s potential for
                      longer time than without, but (I don´t know why there is always a *but*,
                      we have to take it as it is and live and work with it . ;-) ) in a long
                      dry season, like in Portugal, one would be in need of so much water,
                      that the owned land maybe would not be big enough. Everywhere collecting
                      pots, troughs, smaller or bigger lakes... whatever. And the agriculture
                      land will not grow, not just for a good idea. I would like to have it
                      work in a better way...

                      As well, Terra Preta is a very nice, very good and by ancient people
                      long time proofed tool. I will never say nothing against it. I myself
                      are in process of creating Terra Preta. But (Oh Lord! Another "but),
                      I´am living in a region with periodic rain. My rain harvesting this year
                      was absolutely more than succesfull! Thousands of liters in storage and
                      only a very few times in need to use. End of month September, when the
                      first cold and frosty nights came up, I had to let the water from the
                      storages go the nearby creek. Otherwise it would have blast my storage
                      containers.

                      The origin of Terra Preta is different from the climatic situation at my
                      or at Dieter´s location. Dieter´s location is, hmh, let me say: poor. My
                      location tends more too the rich. Off course different to the location
                      where Terra Preta was found. In Amazonian region there is coldness,
                      there are no frosty season like german winter. I am a german livingi
                      Southwest of Germany - latitude of Strassbourg/ France. In wintertime
                      soil microbes in my region go to a kind of "sleep", like hedgehogs do.
                      Prücess of Terra Preta will also got to have a winter rest, start again
                      in spring time, depending on how long frosty climatic soil situation
                      will be. It is different from year to year, sometimes from October to
                      May, sometimes November to April - every changing possible. Absolutely
                      NOT the same like in Portugal or whereever in the world.

                      Water is the key for any process of life on this planet. Still our
                      common question is and will be: How to get enough.

                      You know what I mean?

                      In respect, Kyosan
                    • Michael Meredith
                      I didnt see any photos of what it looked like several years later, so feel that I wasted my time. Michael
                      Message 10 of 30 , Jul 24, 2010
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                        I didnt see any photos of what it looked like several years later, so feel that
                        I wasted my time.
                        Michael



                        >
                        > Please go through this video.
                        >
                        > http://www.archive org/details/ MasanobuFukuoka- ArnissaGreece- 1998
                        >
                        > fukuoka in video, afforestation using seed balls.
                      • Michael Meredith
                        Greece was filled with large trees at the time of Plato, then they cut to burn, and brought in the sheep.... Hello Jason I believe I have answered this
                        Message 11 of 30 , Jul 28, 2010
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                          Greece was filled with large trees at the time of Plato, then they cut to burn,
                          and brought in the sheep....


                          Hello Jason
                          I believe I have answered this question before (on the results of the seeding
                          project - with Fukuoka-San' s participation) .

                          The volunteers had an agreement with the national government that they would
                          safeguard the area - they were to pay the herders to keep the goats and sheep
                          away from the area.


                          A few weeks after the area was seeded, the government changed hands from one
                          party to the other; the herders were not paid, and as soon as the seed balls
                          sprouted and the area turned green, the goats and sheep had a field day -
                          nothing was left.

                          I am just passing along what Panos told me - I have not been at the seeding
                          project.

                          Kostas
                        • Jean Villafuerte
                          What a waste! jean http://www.ammado.com/nonprofit/46130 http://ormocwomen.blogspot.com/ http://evyouth.blogspot.com/ http://www.tcformoc.com/
                          Message 12 of 30 , Jul 28, 2010
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                            What a waste!
                            jean
                            http://www.ammado.com/nonprofit/46130
                            http://ormocwomen.blogspot.com/
                            http://evyouth.blogspot.com/
                            http://www.tcformoc.com/
                            http://pagtinabangayfoundation.blogspot.com/

                            visit my blogs and leave your comments.





                            ________________________________
                            From: Michael Meredith <meredith848@...>
                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Thu, July 29, 2010 7:29:27 AM
                            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] soil



                            Greece was filled with large trees at the time of Plato, then they cut to burn,
                            and brought in the sheep....

                            Hello Jason
                            I believe I have answered this question before (on the results of the seeding
                            project - with Fukuoka-San' s participation) .

                            The volunteers had an agreement with the national government that they would
                            safeguard the area - they were to pay the herders to keep the goats and sheep
                            away from the area.

                            A few weeks after the area was seeded, the government changed hands from one
                            party to the other; the herders were not paid, and as soon as the seed balls
                            sprouted and the area turned green, the goats and sheep had a field day -
                            nothing was left.

                            I am just passing along what Panos told me - I have not been at the seeding
                            project.

                            Kostas






                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Steve Grannis
                            To all, Here s a great show from David Suzuki. Soil microbes and no till discussed. http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/bottomline_20110127_43608.mp3 [Non-text
                            Message 13 of 30 , Feb 2, 2011
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                              To all, Here's a great show from David Suzuki. Soil microbes and no till
                              discussed.

                              http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/bottomline_20110127_43608.mp3




                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Jason Stewart
                              Dear all, Thank you very much Steve Grannis for these informative radio shows hosted by David Suzuki, (for those who don t know:) Japanese-Canadian
                              Message 14 of 30 , Feb 4, 2011
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                                Dear all,

                                Thank you very much Steve Grannis for these informative radio shows hosted
                                by David Suzuki,
                                (for those who don't know:) Japanese-Canadian internationally famous (in the
                                'West') leading figure, in his very very active life in ecological
                                sustainability (activist), and former professor of genetic science,

                                –i found the full podcasts page at:
                                -> feed://www.cbc.ca/podcasting/includes/bottomline.xml
                                from: -> http://www.cbc.ca/podcasting/index.html?newsandcurrent#bottomline

                                On Soils, the 4 segments (A & B of each) of the 2 whole programs, make IMHO
                                worthwhile information filled, myth-busting and convention–transcending
                                programs, with some real points of entertainment value also.
                                (For one of several examples:
                                Joel Salatin, USA, has a great sense of humour,
                                rather loose in scholarly terms while very funny, witty and engaging,
                                –no wonder he's an international speaker–
                                not always so scholarly accurate (correct, although mostly so) and
                                not always so strictly sustainable as our legend late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu
                                sensei,
                                but very helpful entertaining,
                                engaging–for–otherwise–uninterested–or–skeptical–people, and informative
                                speaker, all the same, and
                                in the same direction, polyculture,
                                alike to, "mimicking" of, nature, farming
                                as our sensei late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu accomplished, in actual nature –in terms
                                of at once both philosophical awareness of himself as nature, part thereof, and
                                full farming practice ie. –fully accomplished nature farming–
                                ie. –i mean, Joel Salatin evidently, taking himself and all us listeners to him,
                                in the direction towards nature, via towards our sensei late Mr. Fukuoka
                                Masanobu ... .
                                (in this radio program with David Suzuki and in his farming talks
                                internationally –he spoke across parts of Australia recently for example, eg.
                                see:
                                -> http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bushtelegraph/stories/2010/3077380.htm , and:
                                -> http://www.abc.net.au/rn/lifematters/stories/2010/2910011.htm )
                                My Reference: -> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masanobu_Fukuoka
                                )


                                Thanks again,
                                Biggest best wishes to all, all life, all persons, all human persons and
                                non-human persons.
                                -> http://www.abc.net.au/rn/allinthemind/stories/2010/3081310.htm


                                Jason Stewart
                                —busy in practice in the nature farm, region:far east gippsland, state:
                                Victoria, Oz
                                (vernacular for so called Australia).


                                ________________________________
                                From: Steve Grannis <grannis04@...>
                                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, February 3, 2011 13:31:11
                                Subject: [fukuoka_farming] soil


                                To all, Here's a great show from David Suzuki. Soil microbes and no till
                                discussed.

                                http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/bottomline_20110127_43608.mp3

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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