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Re: Catch 22: The dry-land dilemna ....

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  • Jeff
    I ran across this acticle the other night... its about use of cover crops in extremely arid climates 7 annual precipitation, (Eastern Washington state)
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 27 4:28 PM
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      I ran across this acticle the other night...
      its about use of cover crops in extremely arid climates
      7" annual precipitation, (Eastern Washington state)


      http://www.goodfruit.com/issues.php?article=2428&issue=93

      "they could substitute and turn the mix into a 50-50 mix of crested wheatgrass and perennial rye."

      I believe Crested Wheatgrass was one of the crops Bob Monie reccomends for the fibrous roots and glomalin???

      ..
      j.
      patiently waiting a dry spell so I can plant.. lol
    • Robert Monie
      Hi Jeff,   Yes, crested wheatgrass does well in building glomalin soil levels, though switchgrass, Indian grass, big bluestem, and blue gama do even better
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 27 4:43 PM
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        Hi Jeff,
         
        Yes, crested wheatgrass does well in building glomalin soil levels, though switchgrass,
        Indian grass, big bluestem, and blue gama do even better (in their appropriate regions).
        In general, those native perennial grasses with decomposable fibrous roots are great glomalin builders, though some non-native grasses like vetiver can work too.  I eagerly await further research from the glomalin "boffins" (British term for experimental scientists) to see how this all might pan out for you and me.
         
        Bob Monie

        --- On Mon, 4/27/09, Jeff <shultonus@...> wrote:

        From: Jeff <shultonus@...>
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Catch 22: The dry-land dilemna ....
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, April 27, 2009, 6:28 PM








        I ran across this acticle the other night...
        its about use of cover crops in extremely arid climates
        7" annual precipitation, (Eastern Washington state)

        http://www.goodfrui t.com/issues. php?article= 2428&issue= 93

        "they could substitute and turn the mix into a 50-50 mix of crested wheatgrass and perennial rye."

        I believe Crested Wheatgrass was one of the crops Bob Monie reccomends for the fibrous roots and glomalin???

        ..
        j.
        patiently waiting a dry spell so I can plant.. lol
















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jeff
        ... When you first mentioned this grass,.... I was excited because I was looking for a cool-season grass to balance out the biomass production.... as the
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 27 4:59 PM
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          > Hi Jeff,
          >  
          > Yes, crested wheatgrass does well in building glomalin soil levels, though switchgrass,
          > Indian grass, big bluestem, and blue gama do even better (in their appropriate regions).
          > In general, those native perennial grasses with decomposable fibrous roots are great glomalin builders, though some non-native grasses like vetiver can work too.  I eagerly await further research from the glomalin "boffins" (British term for experimental scientists) to see how this all might pan out for you and me.
          >

          When you first mentioned this grass,....
          I was excited because I was looking for a cool-season grass to
          balance out the biomass production....
          as the others are warm season grasses.....


          .. personally I am a HUGE fan of switchgrass for other reasons:
          its biomass production (as an energy source)
          its amazing roots for preventing erosion near ditches and other waterways...
          and finally,.. its ability to hold back water in a flood....
          36" strip of switch grass can back up 3' of water and release it slowly.......

          as far as the other warm seasons, indian grass seams to be under-ranks as well, .. for the simple fact that its large seeds typically have better germination than many other naitive warm seaons grasses......

          j
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