Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [fukuoka_farming] On Fungus crop rotations & 'weeds'

Expand Messages
  • Don Graves
    There is little more sure than we cannot be sure about anything, as per a humorous comment from a biology & genetics professor, ... when the human species was
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 4, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      There is little more sure than we cannot be sure about anything, as per a
      humorous comment from a biology & genetics professor,

      ... when the human species was first naming ourselves we often thought of
      ourselves as distinct from & much more knowledgable & obviously wiser than
      our fellow non-human animals, & thus we called ourselves 'HOMO SAPIENS
      SAPIENS'... (meaning 'thinking-thinking-man' or 'wise-wise man')...


      since then ... much has been learnt ... & much much more is yet to be
      learnt,
      so now some humility is required in thinking about our own human species
      name
      especially in environmental risk management !!!
      (eg.1 many humans seek to 'control' nature
      (pests/diseases/pathogens/parasites) using pesticides, GE crops &
      conventional tillage. These practices result in soil compaction by feet &
      or vehicle treading ... poor soil aggregation, bare soils & weeds.
      (eg.2 monoculture rotations of 'non-mycorrhizal' (non-host) plants eg Canola
      affects the phosphate-beneficial soil-fungi which must obligatorily form a
      symbiosis with plant roots (weeds or crops), thus crops following such
      non-host rotations are deficiently symbiosed with beneficial soil fungi, &
      thus lacking Phosphate otherwise available via adequate levels of
      mycorrhizal symbiosis in soils & roots.)

      consequently
      ... we might like to consider renaming ourselves 'HOMO HEMI SAPIENS' or
      'HOMO SEMI SAPIENS'...
      meaing 'half thinking' or 'half witted' people!,
      not all-knowing!!
      & we are never going to be able to know ... or understand it all
      we are very small (& HUMAN)
      in a very very BIG ecosystem picture -

      however, ... we can wonder
      EARTH ... & soil life
      it's awesome eh?!
      regards

      PEACE




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Robin Fernández-Medina" <flyingdebris1@...>
      To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2002 9:10 PM
      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] On Fungus



      Thanks to all those responses on the issue of Fungus. I agree with Jamie and
      others on the result of an imbalanced ecosystem being conducive to fungal
      outbreaks. The land I am currently mulching and cultivating on was and is on
      what has always been an olive tree orchard and almond trees. Both dry
      tolerant. I know the old owner was using foliar sprays and this must have
      impacted the surroundings in ways I can only dread. Since we purchased the
      land two years ago we have done nothing in the line of fertilizing or
      clearing or anything out of choice to see what direction things took. The
      prescence of certain weeds indicated patches of poor soil, and the sun burn,
      drought, salting and mineral deficiency look was apparent. Last year we
      started laying cardboard and manures down on the areas we were preparing to
      grow veggies in the future (which turned out to be this summer). The aphids
      were all over in the beginnig and they thinned out to manageable levels
      alone, but it took a long time to see ladybugs so I am not sure what
      happened there. The plants showed deficiencies and the latest (which was my
      comment on fungus) was the spread of leaf rot and just plants dying and
      noticing that the fungus were clearly invading. I try to limit my watering
      hours and always in summer wet the soil and not the leaves. I am thinking
      that perhaps the close by piles of fresh grass clippings has been the focal
      point of this invasion. Not sure but a hunch. Its the first time I have seen
      dill get decimated in this fashion.
      We have a very dry climate here during our summer months. Borderline drought
      and drought prone areas.
      Either way, I really am just standing by and watcing how all these processes
      unfold during these years as the land continues to go untouched.
      Here on the grape vines we use a blue dust that suppreses rot on the grapes.
      I dont know what its called but the farmers tell me that it is innofensive.
      Is this so? Can I apply it to the area under fungal attacks as a solution?
      I would be intereseted to hear of your comments.
      Regards,
      Robin
      jamie wrote:Hello Robin,
      I can only imagine your problem is literally growing out
      of a previous imbalance that has not yet righted itself. What was the land
      you're growing your vegetables on used for previously?
      I've been using a deep mulch for my veg this year instead of watering
      with no fungal problems (I'm just over the border in France from Barcelona).
      I cleared much brushwood last winter and have used this as part of my mulch.
      I noted when spreading it early this year that although we'd had no
      appreciable rainfall over the winter there was still white rot
      (basidiomycetes) invading the twigs and leaves. It might be such an approach
      this autumn/winter might help you by introducing a competing fungus for that
      which is causing your problem - another form of innoculation of the soil,
      but if you have the brushwood it might help.

      Jamie
      Souscayrous

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Robin Fernández-Medina <flyingdebris1@...>
      To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, September 02, 2002 10:56 AM
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] On Fungus


      >
      > Hello everyone,
      >
      > It was nice to read you last email Don Graves. I find Mychorizea a
      fascinating subject. I had the opportunity to Study with Paul Stamets in
      Washington State a few years ago. I learnt a tremendous amount on the
      importance of Fungus in the Ecosystem. In fact, so much so, that I got the
      impression that no fungus, no ecosystem. The beautiful chanterrelle and
      Bollete are two examples of Mychorizea that are enough to get you interested
      in the whole subject.
      > Now that I am on the subject, I find that in the Natural farming method,
      and doing my best to follow the "do nothing approach", the prescence of
      fungus takes a leading role in plant deaths. I always have been one to think
      of leaving all the insects do their thing and if they wasnt to eat my
      vegetables to do so until something or other brings them into balance...as
      well as interplanting other plants and such to control the spread. However,
      fungus is my biggest "pest" ( to use that word) in my Natural farming
      approach. I see it just decimate so many of my plants and trees even though,
      most of the time it doesnt kill its hosts. Fungus are very prolific, and
      some strains seem to be able to leap from one plant to the other without a
      care of type or size. Is there a way at minimizing their impact on my
      vegetable patches?
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Robin
      > Malaga, Spain
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do You Yahoo!?
      > Yahoo! Finance - Get real-time stock quotes
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >


      Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT

      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



      ---------------------------------
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Finance - Get real-time stock quotes

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.