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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Farming in Ethiopia and many other things

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  • Sameer Mohan
    Thanks for the update on Tewold as i had no clue Abt him and that not much was being mentioned at the Shiva School..... It should be most appropriate to attend
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 3, 2002
      Thanks for the update on Tewold as i had no clue Abt him and that not much
      was being mentioned at the Shiva School.....
      It should be most appropriate to attend boththe speakers in this course as
      they work in together...principally and practically...

      Samy
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Robert Monie <bobm20001@...>
      To: <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, September 02, 2002 10:25 PM
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Farming in Ethiopia and many other things


      >
      > Tewolde Egziabher, who will appear with Fukuoka at the Shiva school
      presentation in October, has been steadily guiding Ethiopian farmers back to
      their roots in diversified agriculture. Ethiopians have grown light and
      dark-colored varieties of the tiny grain teff for centuries, without
      recourse to artificial fertilizer, chemical pesticides, or herbicides. An
      instructive overview of Ethiopian practice appears at
      http://www.organicvolunteers.com/forum/display-message.asp?mid=701 .
      >
      > Teff is the kind of agricultural product that international business has
      contempt for, since it is scarcely known outside of its traditional locale
      and has a much smaller world market than the "standard" cereals and grains.
      Yet teff contains within its chromosomes volumes of information that allow
      it to survive in times of drought and pestlience that could not be replaced
      by genetically modified grains of the more familiar type (corn, wheat).
      >
      > So far, the suggested gifts for Fukuoka are seeds and a representation of
      the Shinto god of agriculture (Dosojin?) strumming while the crops grow. If
      seeds are the choice, it would be best to find some local Indian varieties;
      Fukuoka loves to see new varieties; for example he mentions in an interview
      how well African-adapted daikon grow. He was delighted to see that some
      soils in Africa produce better daikons than he got on his own farm in Japan.
      The Shinto god would be ok too, if only we could locate the right one. It
      is easy for well-meaning foreigners to mess up such cross-cultural
      overtures. We don't want to present him with the god of weddings or
      stream-bathing when we mean the god of agriculture; he might be puzzled! I
      wonder about a third choice: Has Fukuoka ever seen Emilia's video, the
      Synergistic Garden?
      >
      > The question of whether the Indian Company that publishes Fukuoka's books
      does so with his permission still seems to be open. Someone should ask him
      if he would like to see his entire printed output (seven books?) available
      on a CD. It would be great if Robert's company could get Fukuoka's latest
      book "Traveling with Seedballs" translated and in print in the US, but many
      different legal interests are no doubt involved.
      >
      > As Don Graves, Dr Ingham and others have suggested, probiotics (using
      beneficial microorganisms to foster plant nutrient delivery and plant health
      both at the root level and the foliar spray leaf-and-stem level) has a role
      to play in natural farming. When a farmer boasts that he or she has grown
      an excellent crop, the credit ought to go to the countless microorganisms
      that have made the nutrients available in an absorbable form and have fended
      off countless attacks and less than beneficial interactions from other
      microorganisms. Sir Arthur Howard knew this in a general sort of way many
      decades ago, but it is easy to forget. We owe as much to these
      microorganisms, fungal and nonfungal, as we do to the natural
      nitrogen-fixers in the soil. My guess is even the cabbages and other greens
      that disdain assistance from micorhizal organisms use as-yet-unidentified
      microorganisms of another kind for similar purposes. Science should turn its
      attention away from profit-making patented crops and toward the ways that
      the multitude of micro-creatures in the soil, water, and air actually do
      most of the "work" of growing the plant. Then, maybe we could all do more
      harp strumming while watching the plants grow.
      >
      > And, yes, this will require precise identification and the use of
      technical terms of the kind that Don Graves and Professor Ingham regularly
      use. No room for the "word police" here. And if Doojin the Shinto plant guy
      wants to wax poetically about such goings on, then let him roll. If the
      great web of living things isn't worth a little philosophy and song, then
      what is?
      >
      > Bob Monie
      >
      >
      >
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    • gate44o
      The link given for the overview of Tewolde and Ethiopian farming practise gave a not found error. I and others are curious and we ask the great Bob to help us
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 6, 2002
        The link given for the overview of Tewolde and Ethiopian farming
        practise gave a not found error. I and others are curious and we
        ask the great Bob to help us understand more about Tewolde and
        his work with Masanobu.

        As I mentioned earlier, Mollison's methods returned Vietnam to a
        sustainable agriculture, and Masanobu's can have a similar or
        greater impact. All evidence of Fukuoka effectiveness in
        stressful environments will help us counter the corporate
        western arguments in favor of foisting GE food on starving
        people.

        Leland
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