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soil

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  • Michael Meredith
    Steve, thanks for the write-up on your planting method. Do you have trouble with deer, squash vine borers, or cucumber beetles? Also, I m starting to buy seeds
    Message 1 of 30 , Mar 3, 2009
      Steve, thanks for the write-up on your planting method.
      Do you have trouble with deer, squash vine borers, or cucumber beetles?
      Also, I'm starting to buy seeds now. Any suggestions?
      Michael


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • grannis04
      Micheal, I have two dogs and so no deer. Last year gardeners in our area had an epidemic of cucumber beetles however there was no sign in my NF cucumbers. I
      Message 2 of 30 , Mar 3, 2009
        Micheal,
        I have two dogs and so no deer. Last year gardeners in our
        area had an epidemic of cucumber beetles however there was no sign in
        my NF cucumbers. I don't have vine borers or least I haven't seen
        them. On seeds I would recommend that you grow all open pollinated
        varieties so that you can save your own seed. This is important in
        that your seeds over time will accommodate to your soil and
        methodology. There are plenty of resources for learning seed saving
        basics. Also ask your garden friends what they like for varieties.
        I love Sun Gold cherry tomatoes but they are a hybrid.

        grow on, Steve G.















        -- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Michael Meredith
        <meredith848@...> wrote:
        >
        > Steve, thanks for the write-up on your planting method.
        > Do you have trouble with deer, squash vine borers, or cucumber beetles?
        > Also, I'm starting to buy seeds now. Any suggestions?
        > Michael
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • mcavincheyfrank
        So, does anyone have any suggestions for Squash Vine Borers? They, cucumber beetles, and squash bugs plague my cucurbids. Frank
        Message 3 of 30 , Mar 3, 2009
          So, does anyone have any suggestions for Squash Vine Borers? They, cucumber beetles, and squash bugs plague my cucurbids.

          Frank


          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Michael Meredith <meredith848@...> wrote:
          >
          > Steve, thanks for the write-up on your planting method.
          > Do you have trouble with deer, squash vine borers, or cucumber beetles?
          > Also, I'm starting to buy seeds now. Any suggestions?
          > Michael
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • yarrow@sfo.com
          At 5:06 AM +0000 3/4/09, mcavincheyfrank wrote: So, does anyone have any suggestions for Squash Vine Borers? They, cucumber beetles, and squash bugs plague my
          Message 4 of 30 , Mar 3, 2009
            At 5:06 AM +0000 3/4/09, mcavincheyfrank wrote:
            So, does anyone have any suggestions for Squash Vine Borers? They,
            cucumber beetles, and squash bugs plague my cucurbids.
            >>

            I haven't had squash vine borers, but for cucumber beetles and squash
            bugs, try (1) planting different varieties of cucurbits and (2)
            changing the timing.

            My garden was inundated with squash bugs, especially, one year when I
            planted two types of small round summer squash too early. Ever since,
            I've avoided those two varieties and planted them later in the
            season, and have not seen any squash bugs.

            One year I saw a cucumber beetle on a papaya squash, waved it away,
            and saw no others the rest of the season! (Maybe my neighbors at the
            community garden were growing varieties they liked a lot better?)

            One way to figure out when to plant is to look up degree days needed
            for the critters to hatch, then figure out when you need to plant
            each year to avoid the first population wave. Many university web
            sites have this information.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Michael Meredith
            ... From: Michael Meredith To: michael meredith Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2009 7:56:57 AM Subject: soil ON
            Message 5 of 30 , Jun 3, 2009
              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Michael Meredith <meredith848@...>
              To: michael meredith <meredith848@...>
              Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2009 7:56:57 AM
              Subject: soil


              ON CREATING ECOSYSTEMS, and ELIMINATING HUNGER

              By Michael Meredith


              There is a lot that can be said about eliminating hunger, but the basics, of course, are food production. The present chemically driven agro-business model is unsustainable, and causes disease. Fortunately, many simple methods are available for increasing food production.
              The root of agriculture, pardon the pun, is the roots. The roots of the plants need nutrition, and lots of valuable animal and vegetable materials are materials thrown away.
              Composting, mulching (also known as sheet composting), and bio-gas (which is a form of anaerobic composting), as well as fermentation (which produces alchohol as a by-product), are all very good methods of recycling unused organic materials to the soil. Often these products can be cycled through animals, and this can become a regular merry-go- round of recycling.
              A properly built pit latrine, or a composting toilet, can eliminate disease, and fertilize crops, as very few pathogens will survive the high temperatures of the composting, or being buried deep in the ground. It is also worth noting that many people believe that the squatting position reduces digestive and reproductive tract diseases. They point to many facts, such as the virtual absence of such diseases prior to the introduction of the porcelain throne, and the fact that African-American males have the highest rate of prostate cancer in the word, meanwhile, in Africa, it is virtually non-existant.
              Many crops can be grown to increase the fertility of the soil. When the Americans and Canadians arrived in the Great Plains in the mid 1800’s, they found deep, rich topsoil going down six feet (they must have danced some jigs over that one). Many people have advocated certain plants as a way to increase fertility. These are often also crop plants with multiple uses.
              The Indians in the Amazon basin built up soil by incorporating urine soaked charcoal into it. The tierra prieta, as it is called, has not washed away as most tropical soils do. This is a good way to recycle urine, and trace minerals can also be added to the blend. Drinking urine has a long history in medicine, it is claimed to cure many diseases, and is quite safe to drink, so don’t worry about putting it in your garden.
              Growing perennial vegetables, bushes, and trees, can reduce labor and other inputs. Most intriguingly, establishing forest gardens can also provide nice places to live, with ornamental, food producing plants and trees all around, creating oxygen, flowers, and all the other things that human persons need and enjoy. It seems that we now have 30% less oxygen in the air than 200 years ago, leading to many diseases. That is one reason why deep breathing can cure disease, and house plants are considered to be beneficial.
              Simple hole/hill farming methods will reduce labor and fertilizer inputs, as only a tiny fraction of the land area needs to be tilled and watered. The melons and squashes, which are most often grown this way, are some of the most nutritious crops available. They can sprawl ten meters or more, covering rocks, bushes, and even houses! The spacing of the holes means that bushes and trees can also be planted in the holes, and do their growing meanwhile many years of squashes are harvested. Moving latrines around is way to dig the garden, and dispose of waste at the same time. The shape of the hole is important, as a water collection area should be left at the surface to retain water. In cross section, we have a funnel, diverting nutrients and water to the plants roots, and holding moisture in the organic sponge. This is a miniature version of the swales, which are often constructed to hold back surface water, and divert it into the ground. Some of these
              methods will turn a desert area into an oasis.
              Foliar sprays are often used to control insects and disease, as well as to fertilize crops. Fogging can be an effective way to water plants, so spraying then becomes a multi-functional system. Some people claim great results by playing music while they spray (study the sonic bloom method, and read “The Secret Lives of Plants”).
              There has been considerable research done with salt tolerant plants, which can be grown in saline marsh areas. With more research, seawater could be pumped into the Sahara desert, and enormous new farms would be created.
              Although I have surely missed your favorite topic in this short summary, I feel that I would be remiss in not saying a few things about ocean agriculture before winding up (or down, as the case may be).
              The best plan that I have ever seen, which gets past the pollution, and poor nutrition of conventional fish farming, is a combination unit.
              The deep ocean waters are nutrient laden. This creates many fine many fishing areas in the world, such as off the coast of Chile. The deep waters hit a steep continental shelf, and up-well, feeding ocean plankton, which feeds the old food chain. By pumping water from the depths, and into a coral lagoon, which has been surrounded by nets to keep out predators, a lively fish farm can be created.
              The dual- purpose part comes in when the difference in temperature of the deep and surface waters is used to spin turbines, and to create solid fuels from the energy. These OTEC plants have been thoroughly researched, but never, as far as I know, in the dual purpose, and therefore more economic, form presented here.
              Of course there is also wave energy, solar energy, orgone energy, and others out the kazoo, but this is an introduction to agricultural research, so you’re going to have to study all that other neat stuff by yourself.
            • Steve Grannis
              ________________________________ From: Michael Meredith To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2009 7:58:21 AM
              Message 6 of 30 , Jun 3, 2009
                ________________________________
                From: Michael Meredith <meredith848@...>
                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2009 7:58:21 AM
                Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil






                Micheal and all, Your post set me wondering about humanure. Does anyone have direct knowledge of Fukuoka's use of humanure? I can't imagine it going to waste in a fully closed loop growing system. Any first hand experiences with the use of humanure in natural farming would be appreciated. Thanks, Steve G.







                ----- Original Message


                ----
                From: Michael Meredith <meredith848@ yahoo.com>
                To: michael meredith <meredith848@ yahoo.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2009 7:56:57 AM
                Subject: soil






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jeff
                I use urine for my herbs.... I primarily use it in bottom watering pots.... my rosemary is so potent it makes ya dizzy if you get too close lol its especially
                Message 7 of 30 , Jun 3, 2009
                  I use urine for my herbs....
                  I primarily use it in bottom watering pots....

                  my rosemary is so potent it makes ya dizzy if you get too close lol
                  its especially good for the drier herbs like rosemary and sage.

                  I scoop it straight from a normal toliet (what ever ratio that turns out to be),
                  my plants are all dark dark green that I feed this way...

                  I'm also in the process of composing
                  dog poo with dried grass....
                  having a problem getting the moisture right,
                  and mixed in properly....

                  I suspect that higher fiber diets would produce better results in humans..
                • michael hollihn
                  michael, thanks for the clear vision, one thing i would add to urine and humanure in the cycle is the woman s blood from her menses....when i lived in the
                  Message 8 of 30 , Jun 4, 2009
                    michael, thanks for the clear vision, one thing i would add to urine
                    and humanure in the cycle is the woman's blood from her menses....when
                    i lived in the kootenays and gulf islands of bc there were many women
                    using a device called a keeper instead of a pad...this contained the
                    blood and they would add it to their tea's for their plants

                    --
                    michael hollihn,
                    british columbia,
                    www.michaelhollihn.wordpress.com (bioregional timber frames)
                    www.kettleriverfood.ning.com (building food security in the kettle
                    River watershed)
                    'Be the change that you want to see' ghandi
                  • Shawn Turner
                    Good Source of nitrogen as well as trace minerals ________________________________ From: michael hollihn To:
                    Message 9 of 30 , Jun 4, 2009
                      Good Source of nitrogen as well as trace minerals




                      ________________________________
                      From: michael hollihn <michaelhollihn@...>
                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2009 10:34:21 AM
                      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil





                      michael, thanks for the clear vision, one thing i would add to urine
                      and humanure in the cycle is the woman's blood from her menses....when
                      i lived in the kootenays and gulf islands of bc there were many women
                      using a device called a keeper instead of a pad...this contained the
                      blood and they would add it to their tea's for their plants

                      --
                      michael hollihn,
                      british columbia,
                      www.michaelhollihn. wordpress. com (bioregional timber frames)
                      www.kettleriverfood .ning.com (building food security in the kettle
                      River watershed)
                      'Be the change that you want to see' ghandi






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • dayjean455
                      Wow! it s the first time i heard of that use for women s mens... When i started having mine, the first blood was used to wipe the face as immunity from
                      Message 10 of 30 , Jun 4, 2009
                        Wow! it's the first time i heard of that use for women's mens...

                        When i started having mine, the first blood was used to wipe the face as immunity from eruptions...

                        The POWER of a WOMAN!!!


                        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Shawn Turner <shawndturner@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Good Source of nitrogen as well as trace minerals
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: michael hollihn <michaelhollihn@...>
                        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2009 10:34:21 AM
                        > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > michael, thanks for the clear vision, one thing i would add to urine
                        > and humanure in the cycle is the woman's blood from her menses....when
                        > i lived in the kootenays and gulf islands of bc there were many women
                        > using a device called a keeper instead of a pad...this contained the
                        > blood and they would add it to their tea's for their plants
                        >
                        > --
                        > michael hollihn,
                        > british columbia,
                        > www.michaelhollihn. wordpress. com (bioregional timber frames)
                        > www.kettleriverfood .ning.com (building food security in the kettle
                        > River watershed)
                        > 'Be the change that you want to see' ghandi
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • Gary Granada
                        Hello! We are looking for jathropa plantation for bio-diesel project investors here in Mindanao, Philippines. Sincerely, Gary B. Granada Davao City,
                        Message 11 of 30 , Jun 9, 2009
                          Hello!

                          We are looking for jathropa plantation for bio-diesel project investors here in Mindanao, Philippines.

                          Sincerely,

                          Gary B. Granada
                          Davao City, Philippines
                          email: eurosign888@...
                          mobile: +639107921524
                          --- On Thu, 6/4/09, Shawn Turner <shawndturner@...> wrote:

                          From: Shawn Turner <shawndturner@...>
                          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Thursday, June 4, 2009, 4:52 PM

















                          Good Source of nitrogen as well as trace minerals



                          ____________ _________ _________ __

                          From: michael hollihn <michaelhollihn@ gmail.com>

                          To: fukuoka_farming@ yahoogroups. com

                          Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2009 10:34:21 AM

                          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: soil



                          michael, thanks for the clear vision, one thing i would add to urine

                          and humanure in the cycle is the woman's blood from her menses....when

                          i lived in the kootenays and gulf islands of bc there were many women

                          using a device called a keeper instead of a pad...this contained the

                          blood and they would add it to their tea's for their plants



                          --

                          michael hollihn,

                          british columbia,

                          www.michaelhollihn. wordpress. com (bioregional timber frames)

                          www.kettleriverfood .ning.com (building food security in the kettle

                          River watershed)

                          'Be the change that you want to see' ghandi



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Michael Meredith
                          Well, Dieter, maybe you should try the tierra prieta. Michael r most of the year, there is very little biomass production. Even on my level fields, which
                          Message 12 of 30 , Nov 3, 2009
                            Well, Dieter, maybe you should try the tierra prieta.
                            Michael

                            r most of the year, there is very
                            little biomass production. Even on my level fields, which haven’t
                            been plowed for 14 years, the losses of humus due to the high
                            temperatures are in some cases greater than what is added due to new
                            plant growth. In these cases, the soil is actually impoverished by
                            not plowing even when no crop is taken off the field.
                          • Rev. Kyosan T. F. Katthagen
                            Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra Preta will not do
                            Message 13 of 30 , Nov 4, 2009
                              Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                              to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                              Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                              people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                              system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                              source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                              Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                              in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                              be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.

                              Kyosan
                            • Michael Meredith
                              Kyosal, How do you know it will not work in dry areas? Wont water harvesting at least extend his season? Michael Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea -
                              Message 14 of 30 , Nov 4, 2009
                                Kyosal,

                                How do you know it will not work in dry areas?

                                Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?


                                Michael


                                Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                                to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                                Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                                people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                                system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                                source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                                Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                                in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                                be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.

                                Kyosan
                              • michaeljking2007
                                If lack of water is the main problem then maybe you could look into using swales to create a better environment for plants and then build on that with
                                Message 15 of 30 , Nov 5, 2009
                                  If lack of water is the main problem then maybe you could look into using swales to create a better environment for plants and then build on that with seedballs/natural farming:

                                  Greening the desert:
                                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S6kTlz6Mk4

                                  Michael



                                  --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Michael Meredith <meredith848@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Kyosal,
                                  >
                                  > How do you know it will not work in dry areas?
                                  >
                                  > Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Michael
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                                  > to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                                  > Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                                  > people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                                  > system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                                  > source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                                  > Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                                  > in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                                  > be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.
                                  >
                                  > Kyosan
                                  >
                                • David Douglas
                                  Hello to all, Would you folks be able to recommend a site that describes producing charcoal for Terra Preta purposes on a small scale? I m not sure if I would
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Nov 5, 2009
                                    Hello to all,

                                    Would you folks be able to recommend a site that describes producing
                                    charcoal for Terra Preta purposes on a small scale?

                                    I'm not sure if I would be able to do this here in the Adirondacks due to
                                    the
                                    strict new burn barrel laws and the amount of smoke that it would give off.
                                    However, I would like to learn more about the procedure, in particular how
                                    to
                                    control the burn temperature so that the charcoal isn't overheated.

                                    Thank you very much.
                                    Best regards,

                                    David Douglas
                                    Adirondack Mountains
                                    NY, US

                                    www.artofdaviddouglas.com



                                    On 11/4/09, Michael Meredith <meredith848@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Kyosal,
                                    >
                                    > How do you know it will not work in dry areas?
                                    >
                                    > Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?
                                    >
                                    > Michael
                                    >
                                    > Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                                    > to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                                    > Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                                    > people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                                    > system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                                    > source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                                    > Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                                    > in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                                    > be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer owns.
                                    >
                                    > Kyosan
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Rev. Kyosan T. F. Katthagen
                                    ... Dear Michael, I hope we do not missunderstand each other too much. I am not against Water Harvesting - it ´s a wonderful idea what everyone should
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Nov 5, 2009
                                      Michael Meredith wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Kyosal,
                                      >
                                      > How do you know it will not work in dry areas?
                                      >
                                      > Wont water harvesting at least extend his season?
                                      >
                                      > Michael
                                      >
                                      > Oh yes, Michael, Terra Preta is a nice idea - if there is a possibility
                                      > to create it by time AND there is enough water. Without water Terra
                                      > Preta will not do anything to stone-hard clay ground, I guess. Ancient
                                      > people in Amazon region have not been in lack of water. They built up a
                                      > system of channels throughout there farming land. They had a nearby
                                      > source of water: the Amazonian River. But there is no Amazonian River in
                                      > Portugal, as I know. Even ideas like Water Harvesting will not work best
                                      > in a country where, as Dieter wrote, last rain was in March. One would
                                      > be in need of more land to collect and store water as a normal farmer
                                      > owns.
                                      >
                                      > Kyosan
                                      >
                                      Dear Michael,

                                      I hope we do not missunderstand each other too much. I am not against
                                      Water Harvesting - it ´s a wonderful idea what everyone should practise
                                      however and whereever. Off course it would extend Dieter´s potential for
                                      longer time than without, but (I don´t know why there is always a *but*,
                                      we have to take it as it is and live and work with it . ;-) ) in a long
                                      dry season, like in Portugal, one would be in need of so much water,
                                      that the owned land maybe would not be big enough. Everywhere collecting
                                      pots, troughs, smaller or bigger lakes... whatever. And the agriculture
                                      land will not grow, not just for a good idea. I would like to have it
                                      work in a better way...

                                      As well, Terra Preta is a very nice, very good and by ancient people
                                      long time proofed tool. I will never say nothing against it. I myself
                                      are in process of creating Terra Preta. But (Oh Lord! Another "but),
                                      I´am living in a region with periodic rain. My rain harvesting this year
                                      was absolutely more than succesfull! Thousands of liters in storage and
                                      only a very few times in need to use. End of month September, when the
                                      first cold and frosty nights came up, I had to let the water from the
                                      storages go the nearby creek. Otherwise it would have blast my storage
                                      containers.

                                      The origin of Terra Preta is different from the climatic situation at my
                                      or at Dieter´s location. Dieter´s location is, hmh, let me say: poor. My
                                      location tends more too the rich. Off course different to the location
                                      where Terra Preta was found. In Amazonian region there is coldness,
                                      there are no frosty season like german winter. I am a german livingi
                                      Southwest of Germany - latitude of Strassbourg/France. In wintertime
                                      soil microbes in my region go to a kind of "sleep", like hedgehogs do.
                                      Prücess of Terra Preta will also got to have a winter rest, start again
                                      in spring time, depending on how long frosty climatic soil situation
                                      will be. It is different from year to year, sometimes from October to
                                      May, sometimes November to April - every changing possible. Absolutely
                                      NOT the same like in Portugal or whereever in the world.

                                      Water is the key for any process of life on this planet. Still our
                                      common question is and will be: How to get enough.

                                      You know what I mean?

                                      In respect, Kyosan
                                    • Michael Meredith
                                      Seems to me that any one in a dry climate would want to do swales, tanks, and charcoal, as the charcoal is permanant, acts to hold onto water, and , further,
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Nov 6, 2009
                                        Seems to me that any one in a dry climate would want to do swales, tanks, and charcoal, as the charcoal is permanant, acts to hold onto water, and , further, is a sponge for micro-organisms to hide in. In fact, many sewage plants, and bio-gas units, use charcoal for this very purpose. His organic matter blows away, or cooks off, in the amazon, it washes away, and cooks off. Could be something there(for the old Dieter).



                                        Heres some more stuff I am doing...............

                                        I finally got the clothing started on the 30 foot tall statue. See some photos here.............


                                        .http://s122.photobucket.com/albums/o252/meredith848/?albumview=slideshow.

                                        Then..... bigsculpture.org...., which explains it

                                        Michael


                                        >
                                        > Kyosan
                                        >
                                        Dear Michael,

                                        I hope we do not missunderstand each other too much. I am not against
                                        Water Harvesting - it ´s a wonderful idea what everyone should practise
                                        however and whereever. Off course it would extend Dieter´s potential for
                                        longer time than without, but (I don´t know why there is always a *but*,
                                        we have to take it as it is and live and work with it . ;-) ) in a long
                                        dry season, like in Portugal, one would be in need of so much water,
                                        that the owned land maybe would not be big enough. Everywhere collecting
                                        pots, troughs, smaller or bigger lakes... whatever. And the agriculture
                                        land will not grow, not just for a good idea. I would like to have it
                                        work in a better way...

                                        As well, Terra Preta is a very nice, very good and by ancient people
                                        long time proofed tool. I will never say nothing against it. I myself
                                        are in process of creating Terra Preta. But (Oh Lord! Another "but),
                                        I´am living in a region with periodic rain. My rain harvesting this year
                                        was absolutely more than succesfull! Thousands of liters in storage and
                                        only a very few times in need to use. End of month September, when the
                                        first cold and frosty nights came up, I had to let the water from the
                                        storages go the nearby creek. Otherwise it would have blast my storage
                                        containers.

                                        The origin of Terra Preta is different from the climatic situation at my
                                        or at Dieter´s location. Dieter´s location is, hmh, let me say: poor. My
                                        location tends more too the rich. Off course different to the location
                                        where Terra Preta was found. In Amazonian region there is coldness,
                                        there are no frosty season like german winter. I am a german livingi
                                        Southwest of Germany - latitude of Strassbourg/ France. In wintertime
                                        soil microbes in my region go to a kind of "sleep", like hedgehogs do.
                                        Prücess of Terra Preta will also got to have a winter rest, start again
                                        in spring time, depending on how long frosty climatic soil situation
                                        will be. It is different from year to year, sometimes from October to
                                        May, sometimes November to April - every changing possible. Absolutely
                                        NOT the same like in Portugal or whereever in the world.

                                        Water is the key for any process of life on this planet. Still our
                                        common question is and will be: How to get enough.

                                        You know what I mean?

                                        In respect, Kyosan
                                      • Michael Meredith
                                        I didnt see any photos of what it looked like several years later, so feel that I wasted my time. Michael
                                        Message 19 of 30 , Jul 24, 2010
                                          I didnt see any photos of what it looked like several years later, so feel that
                                          I wasted my time.
                                          Michael



                                          >
                                          > Please go through this video.
                                          >
                                          > http://www.archive org/details/ MasanobuFukuoka- ArnissaGreece- 1998
                                          >
                                          > fukuoka in video, afforestation using seed balls.
                                        • Michael Meredith
                                          Greece was filled with large trees at the time of Plato, then they cut to burn, and brought in the sheep.... Hello Jason I believe I have answered this
                                          Message 20 of 30 , Jul 28, 2010
                                            Greece was filled with large trees at the time of Plato, then they cut to burn,
                                            and brought in the sheep....


                                            Hello Jason
                                            I believe I have answered this question before (on the results of the seeding
                                            project - with Fukuoka-San' s participation) .

                                            The volunteers had an agreement with the national government that they would
                                            safeguard the area - they were to pay the herders to keep the goats and sheep
                                            away from the area.


                                            A few weeks after the area was seeded, the government changed hands from one
                                            party to the other; the herders were not paid, and as soon as the seed balls
                                            sprouted and the area turned green, the goats and sheep had a field day -
                                            nothing was left.

                                            I am just passing along what Panos told me - I have not been at the seeding
                                            project.

                                            Kostas
                                          • Jean Villafuerte
                                            What a waste! jean http://www.ammado.com/nonprofit/46130 http://ormocwomen.blogspot.com/ http://evyouth.blogspot.com/ http://www.tcformoc.com/
                                            Message 21 of 30 , Jul 28, 2010
                                              What a waste!
                                              jean
                                              http://www.ammado.com/nonprofit/46130
                                              http://ormocwomen.blogspot.com/
                                              http://evyouth.blogspot.com/
                                              http://www.tcformoc.com/
                                              http://pagtinabangayfoundation.blogspot.com/

                                              visit my blogs and leave your comments.





                                              ________________________________
                                              From: Michael Meredith <meredith848@...>
                                              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Thu, July 29, 2010 7:29:27 AM
                                              Subject: [fukuoka_farming] soil



                                              Greece was filled with large trees at the time of Plato, then they cut to burn,
                                              and brought in the sheep....

                                              Hello Jason
                                              I believe I have answered this question before (on the results of the seeding
                                              project - with Fukuoka-San' s participation) .

                                              The volunteers had an agreement with the national government that they would
                                              safeguard the area - they were to pay the herders to keep the goats and sheep
                                              away from the area.

                                              A few weeks after the area was seeded, the government changed hands from one
                                              party to the other; the herders were not paid, and as soon as the seed balls
                                              sprouted and the area turned green, the goats and sheep had a field day -
                                              nothing was left.

                                              I am just passing along what Panos told me - I have not been at the seeding
                                              project.

                                              Kostas






                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • Steve Grannis
                                              To all, Here s a great show from David Suzuki. Soil microbes and no till discussed. http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/bottomline_20110127_43608.mp3 [Non-text
                                              Message 22 of 30 , Feb 2, 2011
                                                To all, Here's a great show from David Suzuki. Soil microbes and no till
                                                discussed.

                                                http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/bottomline_20110127_43608.mp3




                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Jason Stewart
                                                Dear all, Thank you very much Steve Grannis for these informative radio shows hosted by David Suzuki, (for those who don t know:) Japanese-Canadian
                                                Message 23 of 30 , Feb 4, 2011
                                                  Dear all,

                                                  Thank you very much Steve Grannis for these informative radio shows hosted
                                                  by David Suzuki,
                                                  (for those who don't know:) Japanese-Canadian internationally famous (in the
                                                  'West') leading figure, in his very very active life in ecological
                                                  sustainability (activist), and former professor of genetic science,

                                                  –i found the full podcasts page at:
                                                  -> feed://www.cbc.ca/podcasting/includes/bottomline.xml
                                                  from: -> http://www.cbc.ca/podcasting/index.html?newsandcurrent#bottomline

                                                  On Soils, the 4 segments (A & B of each) of the 2 whole programs, make IMHO
                                                  worthwhile information filled, myth-busting and convention–transcending
                                                  programs, with some real points of entertainment value also.
                                                  (For one of several examples:
                                                  Joel Salatin, USA, has a great sense of humour,
                                                  rather loose in scholarly terms while very funny, witty and engaging,
                                                  –no wonder he's an international speaker–
                                                  not always so scholarly accurate (correct, although mostly so) and
                                                  not always so strictly sustainable as our legend late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu
                                                  sensei,
                                                  but very helpful entertaining,
                                                  engaging–for–otherwise–uninterested–or–skeptical–people, and informative
                                                  speaker, all the same, and
                                                  in the same direction, polyculture,
                                                  alike to, "mimicking" of, nature, farming
                                                  as our sensei late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu accomplished, in actual nature –in terms
                                                  of at once both philosophical awareness of himself as nature, part thereof, and
                                                  full farming practice ie. –fully accomplished nature farming–
                                                  ie. –i mean, Joel Salatin evidently, taking himself and all us listeners to him,
                                                  in the direction towards nature, via towards our sensei late Mr. Fukuoka
                                                  Masanobu ... .
                                                  (in this radio program with David Suzuki and in his farming talks
                                                  internationally –he spoke across parts of Australia recently for example, eg.
                                                  see:
                                                  -> http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bushtelegraph/stories/2010/3077380.htm , and:
                                                  -> http://www.abc.net.au/rn/lifematters/stories/2010/2910011.htm )
                                                  My Reference: -> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masanobu_Fukuoka
                                                  )


                                                  Thanks again,
                                                  Biggest best wishes to all, all life, all persons, all human persons and
                                                  non-human persons.
                                                  -> http://www.abc.net.au/rn/allinthemind/stories/2010/3081310.htm


                                                  Jason Stewart
                                                  —busy in practice in the nature farm, region:far east gippsland, state:
                                                  Victoria, Oz
                                                  (vernacular for so called Australia).


                                                  ________________________________
                                                  From: Steve Grannis <grannis04@...>
                                                  To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Thursday, February 3, 2011 13:31:11
                                                  Subject: [fukuoka_farming] soil


                                                  To all, Here's a great show from David Suzuki. Soil microbes and no till
                                                  discussed.

                                                  http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/bottomline_20110127_43608.mp3

                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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