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human powered water lifter?

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  • greengardenvienna
    Hello all, I ve been trying to find information on a type of human-powered water lifter that was developed in China: a dragon spine . Apparently it is good
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 8, 2009
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      Hello all,

      I've been trying to find information on a type of human-powered water
      lifter that was developed in China: a "dragon spine". Apparently it
      is good for getting water both up and across, which is the situation I
      have.

      Our one-acre property is bounded on one side by a sandy-bottomed creek
      that varies greatly in depth and speed of flow. During the spring
      melt and runoff, the creek can be 7 meters deep and very wide-- only a
      few feet from the high-water plateau. In the late summer or during a
      summer drought, it can be knee-deep.

      So you can see the challenge we have in finding a way to lift water
      for use in the garden.

      Here's a photo of the creek at full flow:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-72157613319841070/

      Here's the shallow summer time level:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-72157613291892691/

      Can anyone provide suggestions or information sources?

      Thanks in advance,

      Bev
    • grannis04
      - To Bev, Your pictures tell the story of a paradise. With NF methods you should have no problem retaining water in your gardens. Little or no irrigation
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 8, 2009
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        -
        To Bev,
        Your pictures tell the story of a paradise. With NF methods
        you should have no problem retaining water in your gardens. Little or
        no irrigation should be necessary in your climate. If you have to
        transport water and you don't have running water then you have walking
        water.
        Forest is for-rest, Steve G.









































        -- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "greengardenvienna" <bev@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hello all,
        >
        > I've been trying to find information on a type of human-powered water
        > lifter that was developed in China: a "dragon spine". Apparently it
        > is good for getting water both up and across, which is the situation I
        > have.
        >
        > Our one-acre property is bounded on one side by a sandy-bottomed creek
        > that varies greatly in depth and speed of flow. During the spring
        > melt and runoff, the creek can be 7 meters deep and very wide-- only a
        > few feet from the high-water plateau. In the late summer or during a
        > summer drought, it can be knee-deep.
        >
        > So you can see the challenge we have in finding a way to lift water
        > for use in the garden.
        >
        > Here's a photo of the creek at full flow:
        >
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-72157613319841070/
        >
        > Here's the shallow summer time level:
        >
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-72157613291892691/
        >
        > Can anyone provide suggestions or information sources?
        >
        > Thanks in advance,
        >
        > Bev
        >
      • Larry Haftl
        You might check these links out: http://ewb.students.mtu.edu/guatemala/human_water_lifters.pdf
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 8, 2009
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          You might check these links out:

          http://ewb.students.mtu.edu/guatemala/human_water_lifters.pdf
          <http://ewb.students.mtu.edu/guatemala/human_water_lifters.pdf>

          http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/ah810e/ah810e00.htm



          -----Original Message-----
          From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of greengardenvienna
          Sent: Sunday, February 08, 2009 7:11 PM
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] human powered water lifter?

          Hello all,

          I've been trying to find information on a type of human-powered water
          lifter that was developed in China: a "dragon spine". Apparently it
          is good for getting water both up and across, which is the situation I
          have.

          Our one-acre property is bounded on one side by a sandy-bottomed creek
          that varies greatly in depth and speed of flow. During the spring
          melt and runoff, the creek can be 7 meters deep and very wide-- only a
          few feet from the high-water plateau. In the late summer or during a
          summer drought, it can be knee-deep.

          So you can see the challenge we have in finding a way to lift water
          for use in the garden.

          Here's a photo of the creek at full flow:
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-72157613319
          841070/
          <http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-7215761331
          9841070/>

          Here's the shallow summer time level:
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-72157613291
          892691/
          <http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-7215761329
          1892691/>

          Can anyone provide suggestions or information sources?

          Thanks in advance,

          Bev



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Raju Titus
          Dear friend, Please check this www.ide-india.org/ Thanks Raju ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 8, 2009
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            Dear friend,
            Please check this
            www.ide-india.org/
            Thanks
            Raju

            On 2/8/09, Larry Haftl <lawrence@...> wrote:
            >
            > You might check these links out:
            >
            > http://ewb.students.mtu.edu/guatemala/human_water_lifters.pdf
            > <http://ewb.students.mtu.edu/guatemala/human_water_lifters.pdf>
            >
            > http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/ah810e/ah810e00.htm
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
            > [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com<fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>]On
            > Behalf Of greengardenvienna
            > Sent: Sunday, February 08, 2009 7:11 PM
            > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] human powered water lifter?
            >
            > Hello all,
            >
            > I've been trying to find information on a type of human-powered water
            > lifter that was developed in China: a "dragon spine". Apparently it
            > is good for getting water both up and across, which is the situation I
            > have.
            >
            > Our one-acre property is bounded on one side by a sandy-bottomed creek
            > that varies greatly in depth and speed of flow. During the spring
            > melt and runoff, the creek can be 7 meters deep and very wide-- only a
            > few feet from the high-water plateau. In the late summer or during a
            > summer drought, it can be knee-deep.
            >
            > So you can see the challenge we have in finding a way to lift water
            > for use in the garden.
            >
            > Here's a photo of the creek at full flow:
            >
            > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-72157613319
            > 841070/
            > <
            > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-7215761331
            > 9841070/>
            >
            > Here's the shallow summer time level:
            >
            > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-72157613291
            > 892691/
            > <
            > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-7215761329
            > 1892691/>
            >
            > Can anyone provide suggestions or information sources?
            >
            > Thanks in advance,
            >
            > Bev
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Alan Sloan
            How about a Hydraulic Ram Pump? ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 9, 2009
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              How about a Hydraulic Ram Pump?

              greengardenvienna wrote:
              >
              > Hello all,
              >
              > I've been trying to find information on a type of human-powered water
              > lifter that was developed in China: a "dragon spine". Apparently it
              > is good for getting water both up and across, which is the situation I
              > have.
              >
              > Our one-acre property is bounded on one side by a sandy-bottomed creek
              > that varies greatly in depth and speed of flow. During the spring
              > melt and runoff, the creek can be 7 meters deep and very wide-- only a
              > few feet from the high-water plateau. In the late summer or during a
              > summer drought, it can be knee-deep.
              >
              > So you can see the challenge we have in finding a way to lift water
              > for use in the garden.
              >
              > Here's a photo of the creek at full flow:
              > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-72157613319841070/
              > <http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-72157613319841070/>
              >
              > Here's the shallow summer time level:
              > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-72157613291892691/
              > <http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-72157613291892691/>
              >
              > Can anyone provide suggestions or information sources?
              >
              > Thanks in advance,
              >
              > Bev
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • william maxwell
              This is what the internet came up with.  Looks interesting!  http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/ah810e/AH810E06.htm Either do a search on dragon in the main
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 9, 2009
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                This is what the internet came up with.  Looks interesting! 

                http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/ah810e/AH810E06.htm

                Either do a search on "dragon" in the main article or look for section 3.6.6.

                --- On Mon, 2/9/09, Alan Sloan <alansloan@...> wrote:
                From: Alan Sloan <alansloan@...>
                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] human powered water lifter?
                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, February 9, 2009, 2:47 PM












                How about a Hydraulic Ram Pump?



                greengardenvienna wrote:

                >

                > Hello all,

                >

                > I've been trying to find information on a type of human-powered water

                > lifter that was developed in China: a "dragon spine". Apparently it

                > is good for getting water both up and across, which is the situation I

                > have.

                >

                > Our one-acre property is bounded on one side by a sandy-bottomed creek

                > that varies greatly in depth and speed of flow. During the spring

                > melt and runoff, the creek can be 7 meters deep and very wide-- only a

                > few feet from the high-water plateau. In the late summer or during a

                > summer drought, it can be knee-deep.

                >

                > So you can see the challenge we have in finding a way to lift water

                > for use in the garden.

                >

                > Here's a photo of the creek at full flow:

                > http://www.flickr com/photos/ greengardenvienn a/3251463564/ in/set-721576133 19841070/

                > <http://www.flickr com/photos/ greengardenvienn a/3251463564/ in/set-721576133 19841070/>

                >

                > Here's the shallow summer time level:

                > http://www.flickr com/photos/ greengardenvienn a/3250683073/ in/set-721576132 91892691/

                > <http://www.flickr com/photos/ greengardenvienn a/3250683073/ in/set-721576132 91892691/>

                >

                > Can anyone provide suggestions or information sources?

                >

                > Thanks in advance,

                >

                > Bev

                >

                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • dayjean455
                Hi Bev, We also have the same problem with our small demonstration farm on natural farming here (Ormoc City, Philippines). We have heard of a ram pump years
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 9, 2009
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                  Hi Bev,

                  We also have the same problem with our small demonstration farm on
                  natural farming here (Ormoc City, Philippines). We have heard of a
                  ram pump years ago, though. So, my husband is trying to put up a ram
                  pump to get water below to come up to about 70 meters above where the
                  farm is.

                  Hope this helps. you can google "ram pump". There's a lot in you
                  tube.

                  Jean
                  Philippines



                  --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "greengardenvienna" <bev@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello all,
                  >
                  > I've been trying to find information on a type of human-powered
                  water
                  > lifter that was developed in China: a "dragon spine". Apparently it
                  > is good for getting water both up and across, which is the situation
                  I
                  > have.
                  >
                  > Our one-acre property is bounded on one side by a sandy-bottomed
                  creek
                  > that varies greatly in depth and speed of flow. During the spring
                  > melt and runoff, the creek can be 7 meters deep and very wide-- only
                  a
                  > few feet from the high-water plateau. In the late summer or during
                  a
                  > summer drought, it can be knee-deep.
                  >
                  > So you can see the challenge we have in finding a way to lift water
                  > for use in the garden.
                  >
                  > Here's a photo of the creek at full flow:
                  > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3251463564/in/set-
                  72157613319841070/
                  >
                  > Here's the shallow summer time level:
                  > http://www.flickr.com/photos/greengardenvienna/3250683073/in/set-
                  72157613291892691/
                  >
                  > Can anyone provide suggestions or information sources?
                  >
                  > Thanks in advance,
                  >
                  > Bev
                  >
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