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Subject: edible wild plant books

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  • Judy Phillips
    Souscayrous--I have forwarded your inquiry to some of my foraging friends online that live in europe and will let you know what books they recommend. You and
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 26, 2002
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      Souscayrous--I have forwarded your inquiry to some of my foraging friends
      online that live in europe and will let you know what books they recommend.
      You and anyone interested in learning more about edible wild plants are
      welcome to join the wildforagers discussion group. Just go to

      http://host.whitworks.com/mailman/listinfo/wildforager_food-lists.com

      to subscribe. It is a very knowedgable and friendly group, with members all
      over the globe, so I am sure you will find a niche there. Melana Hiatt, who
      hosts the list, also has a web page at www.ediblewild.com

      Bob's suggestion that you check in at planteuropa and the pfaf database are
      both good ones as well. The most invaluable resources, however, are live
      people who know the habitat! I for one have a hard time identifying plants
      from photos in books, unless they are actually flowering. Going on plant
      walks with friends who know the area has been invaluable to me. Or perhaps
      there is a group in your area who sponsors weekend herb walks and such?
      Start with a few easily recognizable and safe plants, and work more wild
      foods into your diet as you expand your knowledge. It really is great fun
      and such a blessing to receive this bounty with no work or environmental
      impact whatsoever!
      While I still do plant and harvest many cultivated fruits and vegatables, I
      always leave room for the wildlings and pay close attention to where and how
      they grow. For me, learning to recognize and responsibly harvest the food
      that is natural to my habitat is very much in keeping with fukuoka's
      philosophy. How much closer can you get to the "do nothing" philosophy than
      foraging, after all? I feel my foraging also keeps me in
      balance--spiritually and physically--with the cycle of the seasons in my
      area and teaches me much about the ecosystem I live in. Though I am far from
      being an expert yet, I have learned much about my habitat by watching the
      plants that grow here. I hope that this will make me a better gardener.
      Green blessings
      Judy

      Souscayrous wrote:

      Thanks for the insight into your wild garden Judy, this is certainly what I
      had in mind. You're right, I do need to begin to discover just what is
      available here (Southern France, Mediterranean coast, but with large
      Atlantic influence - an edge territory able to support both Northern
      European and Mediterranean plant/animal communities, with wind and sun
      dominant and precipitation as perhaps most limiting factor, although the
      occasional very cold winter also of -10C or more). Does anyone know of a
      book that covers this breadth of nature or two books that cover the edible
      plants of each individual climate? I've had a look at Amazon but can't
      always be sure that the book is European.
      Thanks for the help
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